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RE: [scrumdevelopment] scrum vision retrospective

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  • Esther Derby
    Hi, Alan -- The process you describe is very interesting! Asking people to imagine forward and look back usually reveals gaps in the current plan/approach. I
    Message 1 of 28 , Dec 2, 2003
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      Hi, Alan --

      The process you describe is very interesting! Asking people to imagine
      forward and look back usually reveals gaps in the current plan/approach.

      I do something similar when I facilitate planning:

      1) Imagine the project is complete. Look back on it. What did you
      see/hear/experience? I write down the responses.

      2) Then we look at the current reality -- What are the strengths and
      weaknesses of our current situation (the team, the timeline, the
      environment...) What are the benefits of succeeding with the project?
      What are the dangers of succeeding with the project?

      3) Finally, I ask what the current reality reveals about what we hope to
      accomplish. And then we make a statement of what we can commit to. The
      results is usually a smaller scope (not a big surprise) and a better
      sense of the risks and the limitation of the team. And when these are
      out on the table, the team can do something about them.

      Esther Derby


      Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
      Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
      612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
      =====================================
      Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

      Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
      I'll add details as they become available.
      www.ayeconference.com

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Alan Shalloway [mailto:alshall@...]
      > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 10:05 PM
      > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] scrum vision retrospective
      >
      > I am currently in Ken's Scrummaster training and had an interesting
      > insight. Ken asked that I post it, see if anybody else has done
      > something like this and/or wants to comment on it.
      >
      > What happened was the result of a couple of exercises. In the first
      > exercise we developed the Sprint backlog amongst other things. In
      > the second exercise we were to pretend that we had now completed the
      > first Sprint and now had other things to deal with.
      >
      > What we did at the start of the second exercise was:
      > 1) pretend that we had completed the Sprint
      > 2) look to see what we learned
      > 3) look to see what we would have like to have learned
      >
      > In other words, we did an imaginary retrospection. What we saw in
      > this process (took about 15 minutes) was that our first sprint
      > didn't find out some things regarding performance that we now
      > realized would have been a good idea (something that would have been
      > useful to know going into the second sprint). We looked and found
      > some things that weren't as important that we could take out.
      >
      > The bottom line was this imaginary retrospection helped our original
      > definition of our sprint.
      >
      > It seems to me that this is something to do with all sprint
      > planning. In other words, after defining the vision for the sprint,
      > spend another 15-30 minutes then asking yourself - ok, so we've done
      > this, what next? Is there something else we should have considered?
      >
      > I think this may be useful because while first building the sprint
      > there are many many issues and it's sometimes hard to see the entire
      > big picture. This mini-retrospection allowed us to see the part of
      > the big picture that got lost in picking the backlog originally.
      >
      > Comments?
      >
      >
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    • Dean Goodmanson
      This weblog entry is a nice parrallel: http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting perspective. I m not
      Message 2 of 28 , Dec 2, 2003
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        This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:

        http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html

        Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
        perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
        or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
        another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
        weblog/project journal package. ;-)
        >
        > The bottom line was this imaginary retrospection
        > helped our original definition of our sprint.
        >
        ...
        > This mini-retrospection allowed us to
        > see the part of
        > the big picture that got lost in picking the backlog
        > originally.
        >
        > Comments?
        >
        >


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      • Esther Derby
        ... Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with iteration retrospectives. Rather than color code cards, I some times use a
        Message 3 of 28 , Dec 2, 2003
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          >
          > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
          >
          > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
          >
          Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
          iteration retrospectives.

          Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
          line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
          using the "f" word -feelings- )


          > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
          > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
          > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
          > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
          > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
          >

          I find that it's really critical to make room for emotional responses...
          without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

          Esther Derby
        • Linda Rising
          I use four colors -- since a pack of index cards comes that way :-)! Red: anger, Blue: happiness, Green: challenge, Yellow: surprise You can see a lot about
          Message 4 of 28 , Dec 2, 2003
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            I use four colors -- since a pack of index cards comes that way :-)!
            Red: anger, Blue: happiness, Green: challenge, Yellow: surprise

            You can "see" a lot about the story of the project when the timeline is complete!

            Team members also find that just writing that red card and sticking it on the wall
            helps a lot!



            Linda



            Dean Goodmanson wrote:
            This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
            
            http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
            
            Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
            perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
            or just sequential, or if that matters.  Definitely
            another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
            weblog/project journal package. ;-)
              
            The bottom line was this imaginary retrospection
            helped our original definition of our sprint.
            
                
            ...
              
            This mini-retrospection allowed us to
            see the part of 
            the big picture that got lost in picking the backlog
            originally.
            
            Comments?
            
            
                
            
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          • Hal Macomber
            Wow! What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community. I know I ve been gone for 8 years, but I don t remember this level of attention to
            Message 5 of 28 , Dec 2, 2003
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              Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community.  I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction industry.
               
              We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level.  Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by going from start to finish.
               
              You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?

              Hal
              Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
              From: "Esther Derby"
              Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective


              >
              > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
              >
              > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
              >
              Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
              iteration retrospectives.

              Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
              line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
              using the "f" word -feelings- )


              > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
              > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
              > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
              > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
              > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
              >

              I find that it's really critical to make room for emotional responses...
              without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

              Esther Derby
            • David Vydra
              I think that it is useful to revisit the sprint plan after a few hours, when the mind had a chance to process the information. Regards, David
              Message 6 of 28 , Dec 2, 2003
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                I think that it is useful to revisit the sprint plan after a few hours, when
                the mind had a chance to process the information.

                Regards,
                David
                www.testdriven.com
                www.richclientportal.com

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Alan Shalloway" <alshall@...>
                To: <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 8:05 PM
                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] scrum vision retrospective


                > I am currently in Ken's Scrummaster training and had an interesting
                > insight. Ken asked that I post it, see if anybody else has done
                > something like this and/or wants to comment on it.
                >
                > What happened was the result of a couple of exercises. In the first
                > exercise we developed the Sprint backlog amongst other things. In
                > the second exercise we were to pretend that we had now completed the
                > first Sprint and now had other things to deal with.
                >
                > What we did at the start of the second exercise was:
                > 1) pretend that we had completed the Sprint
                > 2) look to see what we learned
                > 3) look to see what we would have like to have learned
                >
                > In other words, we did an imaginary retrospection. What we saw in
                > this process (took about 15 minutes) was that our first sprint
                > didn't find out some things regarding performance that we now
                > realized would have been a good idea (something that would have been
                > useful to know going into the second sprint). We looked and found
                > some things that weren't as important that we could take out.
                >
                > The bottom line was this imaginary retrospection helped our original
                > definition of our sprint.
                >
                > It seems to me that this is something to do with all sprint
                > planning. In other words, after defining the vision for the sprint,
                > spend another 15-30 minutes then asking yourself - ok, so we've done
                > this, what next? Is there something else we should have considered?
                >
                > I think this may be useful because while first building the sprint
                > there are many many issues and it's sometimes hard to see the entire
                > big picture. This mini-retrospection allowed us to see the part of
                > the big picture that got lost in picking the backlog originally.
                >
                > Comments?
                >
                >
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
              • Esther Derby
                Hal - The feely stuff has always been there (it s there in construction, too). Some of us don t pretend it s not - humans can t really check their emotions
                Message 7 of 28 , Dec 3, 2003
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                  Hal –

                   

                  The “feely” stuff has always been there (it’s there in construction, too). Some of us don’t pretend it’s not – humans can’t really “check their emotions at the door’ without removing part of the brain.

                   

                  My experience is that when you acknowledge and deal with the “feely” stuff, it’s much easier to get the work done. (Recent riff on the topic here: http://estherderby.com/writings/first.htm)

                   

                  And yes, I bring up emotional responses in planning (but I don’t use the “f” word).

                   

                  Esther Derby

                   

                  Esther Derby
                  Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
                  Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                  612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                  =====================================
                  Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                  Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                  I'll add details as they become available.
                  www.ayeconference.com

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Hal Macomber [mailto:hal@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 11:15 PM
                  To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective

                   

                  Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community.  I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction industry.

                   

                  We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level.  Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by going from start to finish.

                   

                  You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?

                  Hal

                  Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
                  From: "Esther Derby"
                  Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective


                  >
                  > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
                  >
                  > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
                  >
                  Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
                  iteration retrospectives.

                  Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
                  line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
                  using the "f" word -feelings- )


                  > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
                  > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
                  > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
                  > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
                  > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
                  >

                  I find that it's really! critical to make room for emotional responses...
                  without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

                  Esther Derby



                  To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                  To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...


                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                • Linda Rising
                  The McCarthy s (Jim and Michele) wrote an interesting book called Software for your Head that describes protocols or patterns for creating and running great
                  Message 8 of 28 , Dec 4, 2003
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                    The McCarthy's (Jim and Michele) wrote an interesting book called Software for your Head that describes protocols
                    or patterns for creating and running great teams. One of these is called Check-in that addresses some of the issues
                    that Esther talks about.

                    http://www.mccarthy-tech.com/elementsofthecore.htm



                    Esther Derby wrote:

                    Hal –

                     

                    The “feely” stuff has always been there (it’s there in construction, too). Some of us don’t pretend it’s not – humans can’t really “check their emotions at the door’ without removing part of the brain.

                     

                    My experience is that when you acknowledge and deal with the “feely” stuff, it’s much easier to get the work done. (Recent riff on the topic here: http://estherderby.com/writings/first.htm)

                     

                    And yes, I bring up emotional responses in planning (but I don’t use the “f” word).

                     

                    Esther Derby

                     

                    Esther Derby
                    Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
                    Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                    612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                    =====================================
                    Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                    Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                    I'll add details as they become available.
                    www.ayeconference.com

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Hal Macomber [mailto:hal@...]
                    Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 11:15 PM
                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective

                     

                    Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community.  I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction industry.

                     

                    We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level.  Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by going from start to finish.

                     

                    You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?

                    Hal

                    Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
                    From: "Esther Derby"
                    Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective


                    >
                    > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
                    >
                    > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
                    >
                    Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
                    iteration retrospectives.

                    Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
                    line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
                    using the "f" word -feelings- )


                    > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
                    > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
                    > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
                    > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
                    > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
                    >

                    I find that it's really! critical to make room for emotional responses...
                    without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

                    Esther Derby



                    To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                    To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...


                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                    To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                    To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...


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                  • Esther Derby
                    Yah, check-ins can really do help people focus. Doesn t have to take a long time. sometimes I do a one work check in In one word, what s happening for you.
                    Message 9 of 28 , Dec 4, 2003
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                      Yah, check-ins can really do help people focus.  Doesn’t have to take a long time… sometimes I do a one work check in “In one word, what’s happening for you…” then if we hear something that sounds like it needs more time, we can do a little further checking. After the check in, sometimes I ask, “what do you need to be ready to work?  Ok, what do you need to do to make that happen?”

                       

                      BTW, I spent the last two days with Charlie and Edie Seashore, two of the greats in the arena of helping groups work effectively and teaching groups to solve their own problems.  One of the participants expressed some frustration with the length of the check-in… Edie’s reply was that the few times she has succumbed to pressure to skip the check in, she has regretted it. 

                       

                      The stuff is still there, and it comes out one way or t’other.  Might was well have it come out with intention and before it sidetracks people from the work they need to do.

                       

                      Purely pragmatic.

                       

                      (well, it’s pragmatic, but not purely so, at least for me.)

                       

                      ED

                      Esther Derby
                      Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
                      Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                      612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                      =====================================
                      Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                      Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                      I'll add details as they become available.
                      www.ayeconference.com

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From:
                      Linda Rising [mailto:risingl@...]
                      Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2003 6:40 PM
                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective

                       

                      The McCarthy's (Jim and Michele) wrote an interesting book called Software for your Head that describes protocols
                      or patterns for creating and running great teams. One of these is called Check-in that addresses some of the issues
                      that Esther talks about.

                      http://www.mccarthy-tech.com/elementsofthecore.htm



                      Esther Derby wrote:

                      Hal –

                       

                      The “feely” stuff has always been there (it’s there in construction, too). Some of us don’t pretend it’s not – humans can’t really “check their emotions at the door’ without removing part of the brain.

                       

                      My experience is that when you acknowledge and deal with the “feely” stuff, it’s much easier to get the work done. (Recent riff on the topic here: http://estherderby.com/writings/first.htm)

                       

                      And yes, I bring up emotional responses in planning (but I don’t use the “f” word).

                       

                      Esther Derby

                       

                      Esther Derby
                      Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
                      Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                      612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                      =====================================
                      Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                      Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                      I'll add details as they become available.
                      www.ayeconference.com

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Hal Macomber [mailto:hal@...]
                      Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 11:15 PM
                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective

                       

                      Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community.  I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction industry.

                       

                      We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level.  Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by going from start to finish.

                       

                      You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?

                      Hal

                      Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
                      From: "Esther Derby"
                      Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective


                      >
                      > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
                      >
                      > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
                      >
                      Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
                      iteration retrospectives.

                      Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
                      line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
                      using the "f" word -feelings- )


                      > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
                      > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
                      > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
                      > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
                      > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
                      >

                      I find that it's really! critical to make room for emotional responses...
                      without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

                      Esther Derby

                       

                      To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                      To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...


                      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                       



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                    • Ron Jeffries
                      ... Yes. I have seen the checkin practice misused, however, as all things seem to be able to be misused. I ve seen it turned into a sort of my story is worse
                      Message 10 of 28 , Dec 4, 2003
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                        On Thursday, December 4, 2003, at 9:57:58 PM, Esther Derby wrote:

                        > Yah, check-ins can really do help people focus. Doesn't have to take a
                        > long time. sometimes I do a one work check in "In one word, what's
                        > happening for you." then if we hear something that sounds like it needs
                        > more time, we can do a little further checking. After the check in,
                        > sometimes I ask, "what do you need to be ready to work? Ok, what do you
                        > need to do to make that happen?"

                        Yes. I have seen the checkin practice misused, however, as all things seem
                        to be able to be misused. I've seen it turned into a sort of "my story is
                        worse than your story" session, or into "let's all make Susie feel better
                        about her sick pet maggot".

                        I guess everything requires skill and concentration. That's why it's so fun
                        being a person.

                        Ron Jeffries
                        www.XProgramming.com
                        Tough life is. Then die you do. --Yoda (personal communication)
                      • DianaLarsen
                        I ve used the colored cards in instances where the card colors represented various parts of the project/iteration. So, for the energetic/emotional content, I
                        Message 11 of 28 , Dec 5, 2003
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                          I've used the colored cards in instances where the card colors represented various
                          parts of the project/iteration. So, for the energetic/emotional content, I gave out an
                          equal number (7 to 10) of blue and green dots to each person - to represent when
                          each person felt most "down" or slowed energy (blue) and when they felt "up" and
                          eager to go ahead energy (green). They stick the dots to various cards, weighting by
                          using more dots on a single card if they like. Then we look at the clusters of dots to
                          track the overall energy/emotional pattern of the project/iteration.

                          This thread has taken an interesting turn into a focus on the retrospectives rather
                          than on Allen's initial posting on what he learned from a look back over an imaginary
                          sprint. In the 80's a company in the Netherlands used a similar kind of /imaginary/
                          task to improve their outcomes. They developed a process called "scenario planning,"
                          in which the stragtegic planning group was tasked with imagining various future
                          conditions then developing differing plans to address each future as if it had actually
                          happened. The organization found that by using this process over time, their
                          management staff became more adept at encountering and quickly responding to
                          unforeseen circumstances as they arose in ways that managers prepared with more
                          traditional strategic planning were never able to do. Sounds like increased agility to
                          me.

                          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Linda Rising <risingl@a...> wrote:
                          > I use four colors -- since a pack of index cards comes that way :-)!
                          > Red: anger, Blue: happiness, Green: challenge, Yellow: surprise
                          >
                          > You can "see" a lot about the story of the project when the timeline is
                          > complete!
                          >
                          > Team members also find that just writing that red card and sticking it
                          > on the wall
                          > helps a lot!

                          Diana

                          Diana Larsen
                          www.industriallogic.com
                          503-288-3550
                          ___
                          Upcoming Class: "Facilitating Project Retrospectives and Reviews: A Practitioner's
                          Toolkit" Jan. 22-23, 2004 at Oregon Graduate Institure
                          ( http://cpd.ogi.edu/class.asp?n=04-pm-13 )
                          I will be speaking at SD West, March 2004, http://www.sdexpo.com/
                          Recent publications:
                          Cutter IT Journal http://www.cutter.com/itjournal/change.html

                          "Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards." Soren A.
                          Kierkegaard (1813-1855)
                        • Linda Rising
                          I wrote an article on scenario planning -- fortune-telling for organizations :-)! http://www.ddci.com/news_vol4num3.shtml
                          Message 12 of 28 , Dec 5, 2003
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                            I wrote an article on scenario planning -- fortune-telling for organizations :-)!

                            http://www.ddci.com/news_vol4num3.shtml



                            DianaLarsen wrote:
                            I've used the colored cards in instances where the card colors represented various 
                            parts of the project/iteration. So, for the energetic/emotional content, I gave out an 
                            equal number (7 to 10) of blue and green dots to each person - to represent when 
                            each person felt most "down" or slowed energy (blue) and when they felt "up" and 
                            eager to go ahead energy (green).  They stick the dots to various cards, weighting by 
                            using more dots on a single card if they like. Then we look at the clusters of dots to 
                            track the overall energy/emotional pattern of the project/iteration. 
                            
                            This thread has taken an interesting turn into a focus on the retrospectives rather 
                            than on Allen's initial posting on what he learned from a look back over an imaginary 
                            sprint. In the 80's a company in the Netherlands used a similar kind of /imaginary/ 
                            task to improve their outcomes. They developed a process called "scenario planning," 
                            in which the stragtegic planning group was tasked with imagining various future 
                            conditions then developing differing plans to address each future as if it had actually 
                            happened. The organization found that by using this process over time, their 
                            management staff became more adept at encountering and quickly responding to 
                            unforeseen circumstances as they arose in ways that managers prepared with more 
                            traditional strategic planning were never able to do.  Sounds like increased agility to 
                            me. 
                            
                            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Linda Rising <risingl@a...> wrote:
                              
                            I use four colors -- since a pack of index cards comes that way :-)!
                            Red: anger, Blue: happiness, Green: challenge, Yellow: surprise
                            
                            You can "see" a lot about the story of the project when the timeline is 
                            complete!
                            
                            Team members also find that just writing that red card and sticking it 
                            on the wall
                            helps a lot!
                                
                            Diana
                            
                            Diana Larsen
                            www.industriallogic.com
                            503-288-3550
                            ___
                            Upcoming Class: "Facilitating Project Retrospectives and Reviews: A Practitioner's 
                            Toolkit" Jan. 22-23, 2004 at Oregon Graduate Institure
                            ( http://cpd.ogi.edu/class.asp?n=04-pm-13 )
                            I will be speaking at SD West, March 2004, http://www.sdexpo.com/
                            Recent publications:
                            Cutter IT Journal http://www.cutter.com/itjournal/change.html
                            
                            "Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards." Soren A. 
                            Kierkegaard (1813-1855)
                            
                            
                            
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                          • Linda Rising
                            I ve been trying to find my reference for this and can t, so here goes. I read about an exercise for the planning stage that involves the planners in creating
                            Message 13 of 28 , Dec 5, 2003
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                              I've been trying to find my reference for this and can't, so here goes.

                              I read about an exercise for the planning stage that involves the
                              planners in creating an
                              explanation to their bosses -- saying why the project (the one they were
                              currently planning)
                              failed. This forced them out of their typically optimistic mode and
                              sunny day scenarios to
                              think about the very real risks they faced. It was very effective...now
                              if I could just find
                              my notes on that...



                              Linda


                              Alan Shalloway wrote:

                              >I am currently in Ken's Scrummaster training and had an interesting
                              >insight. Ken asked that I post it, see if anybody else has done
                              >something like this and/or wants to comment on it.
                              >
                              >What happened was the result of a couple of exercises. In the first
                              >exercise we developed the Sprint backlog amongst other things. In
                              >the second exercise we were to pretend that we had now completed the
                              >first Sprint and now had other things to deal with.
                              >
                              >What we did at the start of the second exercise was:
                              > 1) pretend that we had completed the Sprint
                              > 2) look to see what we learned
                              > 3) look to see what we would have like to have learned
                              >
                              >In other words, we did an imaginary retrospection. What we saw in
                              >this process (took about 15 minutes) was that our first sprint
                              >didn't find out some things regarding performance that we now
                              >realized would have been a good idea (something that would have been
                              >useful to know going into the second sprint). We looked and found
                              >some things that weren't as important that we could take out.
                              >
                              >The bottom line was this imaginary retrospection helped our original
                              >definition of our sprint.
                              >
                              >It seems to me that this is something to do with all sprint
                              >planning. In other words, after defining the vision for the sprint,
                              >spend another 15-30 minutes then asking yourself - ok, so we've done
                              >this, what next? Is there something else we should have considered?
                              >
                              >I think this may be useful because while first building the sprint
                              >there are many many issues and it's sometimes hard to see the entire
                              >big picture. This mini-retrospection allowed us to see the part of
                              >the big picture that got lost in picking the backlog originally.
                              >
                              >Comments?
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                              >To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
                              >
                              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            • Robert Henley
                              ... /imaginary/ ... planning, ... future ... had actually ... their ... to ... more ... increased agility to ... That company was Royal Dutch/Shell, and this
                              Message 14 of 28 , Dec 5, 2003
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                                > In the 80's a company in the Netherlands used a similar kind of
                                /imaginary/
                                > task to improve their outcomes. They developed a process called "scenario
                                planning,"
                                > in which the stragtegic planning group was tasked with imagining various
                                future
                                > conditions then developing differing plans to address each future as if it
                                had actually
                                > happened. The organization found that by using this process over time,
                                their
                                > management staff became more adept at encountering and quickly responding
                                to
                                > unforeseen circumstances as they arose in ways that managers prepared with
                                more
                                > traditional strategic planning were never able to do. Sounds like
                                increased agility to
                                > me.

                                That company was Royal Dutch/Shell, and this kind of planning made them the
                                only oil company to come out of the OPEC crisis of the 1970's with a profit!
                                That story (among others) is documented in "The Art of the Long View" by
                                Peter
                                Schwartz. It certainly affected how I think about things long-term.

                                Robert Henley
                                Software Architect
                                Certified ScrumMaster
                              • Boris Gloger
                                I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting, BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4. I mean we do have more
                                Message 15 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                  I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting,
                                  BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.

                                  I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness,
                                  Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are
                                  important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.

                                  The direction I like the way not.

                                  Boris

                                  (btw - I agree that is difficult to express emotions,...)

                                  On Friday, Dec 5, 2003, at 01:40 Europe/Vienna, Linda Rising wrote:

                                  > The McCarthy's (Jim and Michele) wrote an interesting book called
                                  > Software for your Head that describes protocols
                                  > or patterns for creating and running great teams. One of these is
                                  > called Check-in that addresses some of the issues
                                  > that Esther talks about.
                                  >
                                  > http://www.mccarthy-tech.com/elementsofthecore.htm
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Esther Derby wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Hal –
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > The “feely” stuff has always been there (it’s there in construction,
                                  > too). Some of us don’t pretend it’s not – humans can’t really “check
                                  > their emotions at the door’ without removing part of the brain.
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > My experience is that when you acknowledge and deal with the “feely”
                                  > stuff, it’s much easier to get the work done. (Recent riff on the
                                  > topic here: http://estherderby.com/writings/first.htm)
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > And yes, I bring up emotional responses in planning (but I don’t use
                                  > the “f” word).
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > Esther Derby
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > Esther Derby
                                  > Esther DerbyAssociates, Inc.
                                  > Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                                  > 612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                                  > =====================================
                                  > Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html
                                  >
                                  > Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                                  > I'll add details as they become available.
                                  > www.ayeconference.com
                                  >
                                  > -----Original Message-----
                                  > From: Hal Macomber [mailto:hal@...]
                                  > Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 11:15 PM
                                  > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community. 
                                  > I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of
                                  > attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction
                                  > industry.
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase
                                  > scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then
                                  > works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are
                                  > identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level. 
                                  > Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by
                                  > going from start to finish.
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  > You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how
                                  > it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing
                                  > the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?
                                  >
                                  > Hal
                                  >
                                  > Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
                                  > From: "Esther Derby"
                                  > Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  > > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
                                  > >
                                  > > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
                                  > >
                                  > Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
                                  > iteration retrospectives.
                                  >
                                  > Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or
                                  > energy
                                  > line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
                                  > using the "f" word -feelings- )
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
                                  > > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
                                  > > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
                                  > > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
                                  > > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > I find that it's really! critical to make room for emotional
                                  > responses...
                                  > without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.
                                  >
                                  > Esther Derby
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                                  > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                                  > scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
                                  >
                                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                                  > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                                  > scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
                                  >
                                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  Boris Gloger

                                  Vienna, Austria
                                  +43 699 1699 4977
                                • Ron Jeffries
                                  ... I m sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there /are/ just four emotions. It s a communications trick, I would say, intended to
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                    On Monday, December 15, 2003, at 8:56:55 AM, Boris Gloger wrote:

                                    > I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting,
                                    > BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.

                                    > I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness,
                                    > Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are
                                    > important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.

                                    > The direction I like the way not.

                                    I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there
                                    /are/ just four emotions.

                                    It's a communications trick, I would say, intended to focus our attention
                                    on those specific dimensions, to help get to the issues rather than deal
                                    with delicate nuances of feeling.

                                    Ron Jeffries
                                    www.XProgramming.com
                                    There is really no such thing as bad weather,
                                    only different kinds of good weather. ~John Ruskin
                                  • Linda Rising
                                    Hi Boris, It s been a couple of years since I edited this book but as I remember there are studies to show that any feeling can be expressed as one of these
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                      Hi Boris,

                                      It's been a couple of years since I edited this book but as I remember there are studies to show that any
                                      "feeling" can be expressed as one of these four or a combination thereof and that the benefit of adding
                                      yet another emotion isn't worth the added burden in vocabulary. It reminds me of a discussion I once had
                                      with Martin Fowler about whether to combine two patterns or keep them separate. His answer  was
                                      something like: By keeping them separate you add another pattern to the pattern language.
                                      That's an extra burden for the user. Is it worth it?

                                      In both cases, what we have is increased expressiveness at the cost of increased cognitive effort -- so,
                                      it's like a lot of things in life -- trade-offs :-)!

                                      I know Jim and/or Michele can give you a better answer -- they've thought about this stuff for years
                                      and taught zillions of bootcamps. As I'm sure you've read -- they started these ideas when they were
                                      both at Microsoft and over time found the "patterns" they describe -- so they're not theoretical constructs
                                      that were developed in isolation but things that have worked successfully to build great teams.




                                      Linda



                                      Boris Gloger wrote:
                                      I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting, BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.

                                      I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness, Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.

                                      The direction I like the way not.

                                      Boris

                                      (btw - I agree that is difficult to express emotions,...)

                                      On Friday, Dec 5, 2003, at 01:40 Europe/Vienna, Linda Rising wrote:

                                      The McCarthy's (Jim and Michele) wrote an interesting book called Software for your Head that describes protocols
                                      or patterns for creating and running great teams. One of these is called Check-in that addresses some of the issues
                                      that Esther talks about.

                                      http://www.mccarthy-tech.com/elementsofthecore.htm



                                      Esther Derby wrote:



                                      Hal –

                                       

                                      The “feely” stuff has always been there (it’s there in construction, too). Some of us don’t pretend it’s not – humans can’t really “check their emotions at the door’ without removing part of the brain.

                                       

                                      My experience is that when you acknowledge and deal with the “feely” stuff, it’s much easier to get the work done. (Recent riff on the topic here: http://estherderby.com/writings/first.htm)

                                       

                                      And yes, I bring up emotional responses in planning (but I don’t use the “f” word).

                                       

                                      Esther Derby

                                       

                                      Esther Derby
                                      Esther DerbyAssociates, Inc.
                                      Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                                      612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                                      =====================================
                                      Weblog:
                                      www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                                      Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                                      I'll add details as they become available.
                                      www.ayeconference.com

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: Hal Macomber [mailto:hal@...]
                                      Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 11:15 PM
                                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective


                                       

                                      Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community.  I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction industry.

                                       

                                      We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level.  Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by going from start to finish.

                                       

                                      You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?

                                      Hal

                                      Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
                                      From: "Esther Derby"
                                      Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective


                                      >
                                      > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
                                      >
                                      > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
                                      >
                                      Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
                                      iteration retrospectives.

                                      Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
                                      line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
                                      using the "f" word -feelings- )


                                      > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
                                      > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
                                      > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
                                      > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
                                      > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
                                      >

                                      I find that it's really! critical to make room for emotional responses...
                                      without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

                                      Esther Derby



                                      To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
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                                      Boris Gloger

                                      Vienna, Austria
                                      +43 699 1699 4977


                                    • Linda Rising
                                      Wish I had said this :-)! What I saw at the McCarthy bootcamp was a protocol -- where it was easy to say how you felt without too much soul searching and
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                        Wish I had said this :-)! What I saw at the McCarthy bootcamp was a "protocol" -- where it was
                                        easy to say how you felt without too much soul searching and also easy to get what others were
                                        feeling -- it worked and then you could move on.




                                        Ron Jeffries wrote:
                                        On Monday, December 15, 2003, at 8:56:55 AM, Boris Gloger wrote:
                                        
                                          
                                        I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting, 
                                        BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.
                                            
                                          
                                        I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness, 
                                        Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are 
                                        important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.
                                            
                                          
                                        The direction I like the way not.
                                            
                                        I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there
                                        /are/ just four emotions.
                                        
                                        It's a communications trick, I would say, intended to focus our attention
                                        on those specific dimensions, to help get to the issues rather than deal
                                        with delicate nuances of feeling.
                                        
                                        Ron Jeffries
                                        www.XProgramming.com
                                        There is really no such thing as bad weather,
                                        only different kinds of good weather.  ~John Ruskin
                                        
                                        
                                        ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
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                                        http://us.click.yahoo.com/IMai8D/UYQGAA/cIoLAA/9EfwlB/TM
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                                      • Linda Rising
                                        Just thought of a story that Michele told at bootcamp. How many times have you been at a team meeting (maybe a Scrum?) and someone joined the group, clearly in
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                          Just thought of a story that Michele told at bootcamp.

                                          How many times have you been at a team meeting (maybe a Scrum?) and someone joined the group,
                                          clearly in a bad mood. Maybe he slamed his book on the table or sat down heavily or just had a nasty
                                          expression on his face. Now everyone in the room is wondering what's wrong. Maybe the guy next
                                          to him knows him well enough to ask what's up and, of course, the reply is, "Nah, it's
                                          nothing." Everyone is thinking, "Has he heard something about the rumor of lay-offs? Is he angry
                                          with me?" That means the focus of the energy in the room is on the anxiety that everyone feels
                                          instead of the work at hand.

                                          And all of this for perhaps no reason. Maybe the guy had a flat tire on the way to work. But, of
                                          course, he doesn't want to take up "valuable" time to tell everyone his problems. Wouldn't it be great
                                          if there were a simple protocol that would begin every meeting. Go around the room and each person
                                          can say: I'm <emotion or list of emotions> (optional short explanation) or pass. It takes a minute or
                                          two and when the angry guy says, "I'm mad because I slept late and didn't get my morning run, but
                                          I'm in!" he feels better and every person in the room is now OK. *And* because he knows
                                          he'll get to Checkin, he comes in to the room in an entirely different way (there's the real benefit).

                                          It's like a retrospective. The team knows there will be a time to say what needs to be said. They'll get
                                          to write that red card. They'll feel better when they write that red card *and* they'll feel better even
                                          before they write that red card because they know .......

                                          :-)

                                          I'm a believer :-)!











                                          Linda Rising wrote:
                                          Wish I had said this :-)! What I saw at the McCarthy bootcamp was a "protocol" -- where it was
                                          easy to say how you felt without too much soul searching and also easy to get what others were
                                          feeling -- it worked and then you could move on.




                                          Ron Jeffries wrote:
                                          On Monday, December 15, 2003, at 8:56:55 AM, Boris Gloger wrote:
                                          
                                            
                                          I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting, 
                                          BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.
                                              
                                            
                                          I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness, 
                                          Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are 
                                          important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.
                                              
                                            
                                          The direction I like the way not.
                                              
                                          I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there
                                          /are/ just four emotions.
                                          
                                          It's a communications trick, I would say, intended to focus our attention
                                          on those specific dimensions, to help get to the issues rather than deal
                                          with delicate nuances of feeling.
                                          
                                          Ron Jeffries
                                          www.XProgramming.com
                                          There is really no such thing as bad weather,
                                          only different kinds of good weather.  ~John Ruskin
                                          
                                          
                                          ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
                                          KnowledgeStorm has over 22,000 B2B technology solutions. The most comprehensive IT buyers' information available. Research, compare, decide. E-Commerce | Application Dev | Accounting-Finance | Healthcare | Project Mgt | Sales-Marketing | More
                                          http://us.click.yahoo.com/IMai8D/UYQGAA/cIoLAA/9EfwlB/TM
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                                        • Diana Larsen
                                          I don t debate the result, but I do find it interesting that we humans seem to have identified a 3:1 ratio of negative emotion to positive ones. Why could
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                            I don't debate the result, but I do find it interesting that we humans
                                            seem to have identified a 3:1 ratio of "negative" emotion to "positive"
                                            ones. Why could it not be further reduced to: "I feel bad" "I feel
                                            good" if we take the collapsing to its logical conclusion?

                                            I wonder if it is where we put our attention - like people of the far
                                            North who reportedly have many more names for snow or we here in the
                                            Northwest who can distinguish numerous variations in the types of rain.
                                            Do you suppose there would be more finesse to "gladness" if we really
                                            knew how to put our attention there? Or really found "positive" emotion
                                            to be as interesting and informative about each other as "negative"
                                            ones? I myself find quite a difference between contentment and joy -
                                            and whether I am feeling one or the other would make a difference in my
                                            work. Is anyone ready to put in the time to categorize and create a
                                            taxonomy of positive emotion to include at check in?

                                            Diana

                                            Diana Larsen
                                            www.industriallogic.com
                                            503-288-3550
                                            ___
                                            Upcoming Class: "Facilitating Project Retrospectives and Reviews: A
                                            Practitioner's Toolkit" Jan. 22-23, 2004 at Oregon Graduate Institure
                                            ( http://cpd.ogi.edu/class.asp?n=04-pm-13 )
                                            I will be speaking at SD West, March 2004, http://www.sdexpo.com/
                                            Recent publications:
                                            Cutter IT Journal http://www.cutter.com/itjournal/change.html

                                            "Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards."
                                            Soren A. Kierkegaard (1813-1855)

                                            On Dec 15, 2003, at 8:34 AM, Linda Rising wrote:

                                            > Wish I had said this :-)! What I saw at the McCarthy bootcamp was a
                                            > "protocol" -- where it was
                                            > easy to say how you felt without too much soul searching and also easy
                                            > to get what others were
                                            > feeling -- it worked and then you could move on.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Ron Jeffries wrote:
                                            >
                                            > On Monday, December 15, 2003, at 8:56:55 AM, Boris Gloger wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting,
                                            > BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness,
                                            > Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are
                                            > important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > The direction I like the way not.
                                            >
                                            > I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there
                                            > /are/ just four emotions.
                                            >
                                            > It's a communications trick, I would say, intended to focus our
                                            > attention
                                            > on those specific dimensions, to help get to the issues rather than
                                            > deal
                                            > with delicate nuances of feeling.
                                            >
                                            > Ron Jeffries
                                            > www.XProgramming.com
                                            > There is really no such thing as bad weather,
                                            > only different kinds of good weather. ~John Ruskin
                                            >
                                          • Linda Rising
                                            If anyone could do a categorization for positive emotions, Diana, it would be you :-)! Go for it :-)!!
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                              If anyone could do a categorization for positive emotions, Diana, it would be you :-)!

                                              Go for it :-)!!




                                              Diana Larsen wrote:
                                              I don't debate the result, but I do find it interesting that we humans 
                                              seem to have identified a 3:1 ratio of "negative" emotion to "positive" 
                                              ones. Why could it not be further reduced to: "I feel bad" "I feel 
                                              good" if we take the collapsing to its logical conclusion?
                                              
                                              I wonder if it is where we put our attention - like people of the far 
                                              North who reportedly have many more names for snow or we here in the 
                                              Northwest who can distinguish numerous variations in the types of rain. 
                                              Do you suppose there would be more finesse to "gladness" if we really 
                                              knew how to put our attention there? Or really found "positive" emotion 
                                              to be as interesting and informative about each other as "negative" 
                                              ones? I myself find quite a difference between contentment and joy - 
                                              and whether I am feeling one or the other would make a difference in my 
                                              work. Is anyone ready to put in the time to categorize and create a 
                                              taxonomy of positive emotion to include at check in?
                                              
                                              Diana
                                              
                                              Diana Larsen
                                              www.industriallogic.com
                                              503-288-3550
                                              ___
                                              Upcoming Class: "Facilitating Project Retrospectives and Reviews: A 
                                              Practitioner's Toolkit" Jan. 22-23, 2004 at Oregon Graduate Institure
                                              ( http://cpd.ogi.edu/class.asp?n=04-pm-13 )
                                              I will be speaking at SD West, March 2004, http://www.sdexpo.com/
                                              Recent publications:
                                              Cutter IT Journal http://www.cutter.com/itjournal/change.html
                                              
                                              "Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards." 
                                              Soren A. Kierkegaard (1813-1855)
                                              
                                              On Dec 15, 2003, at 8:34 AM, Linda Rising wrote:
                                              
                                                
                                              Wish I had said this :-)! What I saw at the McCarthy bootcamp was a 
                                              "protocol" -- where it was
                                              easy to say how you felt without too much soul searching and also easy 
                                              to get what others were
                                              feeling -- it worked and then you could move on.
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              Ron Jeffries wrote:
                                              
                                              On Monday, December 15, 2003, at 8:56:55 AM, Boris Gloger wrote:
                                              
                                              
                                              I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting,
                                              BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.
                                              
                                              
                                              I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness,
                                              Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are
                                              important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.
                                              
                                              
                                              The direction I like the way not.
                                              
                                              I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there
                                              /are/ just four emotions.
                                              
                                              It's a communications trick, I would say, intended to focus our 
                                              attention
                                              on those specific dimensions, to help get to the issues rather than 
                                              deal
                                              with delicate nuances of feeling.
                                              
                                              Ron Jeffries
                                              www.XProgramming.com
                                              There is really no such thing as bad weather,
                                              only different kinds of good weather.  ~John Ruskin
                                              
                                                  
                                              
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                                            • Mike Beedle
                                              ... the pattern language. ... Linda: Well, Alexander thinks it is. That s why he wrote: A City is not a Tree i.e. a pattern language is _not_ a discretized
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                                Message
                                                 
                                                Linda writes:
                                                > It reminds me of a discussion I
                                                once had with Martin Fowler about
                                                > whether to combine two patterns
                                                or keep them separate. His answer  was 
                                                > something like: By keeping them separate you add another pattern to the pattern language.
                                                > That's an extra burden for the user. Is it worth it?
                                                 
                                                Linda:
                                                 
                                                Well, Alexander thinks it is.  That's why he wrote: 
                                                 
                                                    "A City is not a Tree"
                                                 
                                                i.e. a pattern language is _not_ a discretized reductionist conceptual "tree" .... it allows
                                                overlapping structures.
                                                 
                                                Overlapping is important because it basically says that objects and patterns
                                                in the world do not have necessarily an "exclusion principle".  In other words, "things" in one pattern
                                                may form other patterns with other things external to it.
                                                 
                                                This also prevents for "self-righteous" hierarchies:  things can be categorized, arranged
                                                or classified in many ways.... all in an overlapping model.
                                                 
                                                There are many truths to a "model".
                                                 
                                                This is true for patterns, object models, semantic networks, conceptual graphs and even
                                                Bayesian networks.
                                                 
                                                As far as the emotional Hilbert space i.e. emotions are superpositions of an
                                                orthonormal basis of emotions, I don't buy it.   I think emotions are more complex
                                                than that.... and won't even dare to give a quick answer to that :-)
                                                 
                                                - Mike


                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: Linda Rising [mailto:risingl@...]
                                                Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 10:32 AM
                                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective

                                                Hi Boris,

                                                It's been a couple of years since I edited this book but as I remember there are studies to show that any
                                                "feeling" can be expressed as one of these four or a combination thereof and that the benefit of adding
                                                yet another emotion isn't worth the added burden in vocabulary. It reminds me of a discussion I once had
                                                with Martin Fowler about whether to combine two patterns or keep them separate. His answer  was
                                                something like: By keeping them separate you add another pattern to the pattern language.
                                                That's an extra burden for the user. Is it worth it?

                                                In both cases, what we have is increased expressiveness at the cost of increased cognitive effort -- so,
                                                it's like a lot of things in life -- trade-offs :-)!

                                                I know Jim and/or Michele can give you a better answer -- they've thought about this stuff for years
                                                and taught zillions of bootcamps. As I'm sure you've read -- they started these ideas when they were
                                                both at Microsoft and over time found the "patterns" they describe -- so they're not theoretical constructs
                                                that were developed in isolation but things that have worked successfully to build 
                                                  great teams.




                                                Linda



                                                Boris Gloger wrote:
                                                I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit interesting, BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.

                                                I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness, Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions are important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.

                                                The direction I like the way not.

                                                Boris

                                                (btw - I agree that is difficult to express emotions,...)

                                                On Friday, Dec 5, 2003, at 01:40 Europe/Vienna, Linda Rising wrote:

                                                The McCarthy's (Jim and Michele) wrote an interesting book called Software for your Head that describes protocols
                                                or patterns for creating and running great teams. One of these is called Check-in that addresses some of the issues
                                                that Esther talks about.

                                                http://www.mccarthy-tech.com/elementsofthecore.htm



                                                Esther Derby wrote:



                                                Hal –

                                                 

                                                The “feely” stuff has always been there (it’s there in construction, too). Some of us don’t pretend it’s not – humans can’t really “check their emotions at the door’ without removing part of the brain.

                                                 

                                                My experience is that when you acknowledge and deal with the “feely” stuff, it’s much easier to get the work done. (Recent riff on the topic here: http://estherderby.com/writings/first.htm)

                                                 

                                                And yes, I bring up emotional responses in planning (but I don’t use the “f” word).

                                                 

                                                Esther Derby

                                                 

                                                Esther Derby
                                                Esther DerbyAssociates, Inc.
                                                Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                                                612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                                                =====================================
                                                Weblog:
                                                www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                                                Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                                                I'll add details as they become available.
                                                www.ayeconference.com

                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: Hal Macomber [mailto:hal@...]
                                                Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 11:15 PM
                                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective


                                                 

                                                Wow!  What is all this touchy feely stuff in the software community.  I know I've been gone for 8 years, but I don't remember this level of attention to feelings.  Maybe I've been hardened by the construction industry.

                                                 

                                                We've been using a sticky note technique for (reverse) phase scheduling projects.  It starts with the end deliverables and then works backwards adding just those value-adding steps.  Constraints are identified along the way.  The 'scheduling' is kept to a high level.  Once at the beginning we look to improve upon the backward pass by going from start to finish.

                                                 

                                                You call this a retrospective, as in "let's review what we did and how it came out."  Is that right?  I'm curious what you think about doing the feelings test in the planning of the project.  Any comments?

                                                Hal

                                                Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:36:54 -0600
                                                From: "Esther Derby"
                                                Subject: RE: scrum vision retrospective


                                                >
                                                > This weblog entry is a nice parrallel:
                                                >
                                                > http://martinfowler.com/bliki/StickyTimeline.html
                                                >
                                                Very nice, indeed. Tim McKinnon has done some really nice work with
                                                iteration retrospectives.

                                                Rather than color code cards, I some times use a "seismograph" or energy
                                                line above the events to show how people felt (thought I usually avoid
                                                using the "f" word -feelings- )


                                                > Feeling (satisfaction?) colors add an interesting
                                                > perspective. I'm not sure if the timeline is to scale
                                                > or just sequential, or if that matters. Definitely
                                                > another reason to add smiley's (color coded?) to your
                                                > weblog/project journal package. ;-)
                                                >

                                                I find that it's really! critical to make room for emotional responses...
                                                without them you never get to the stuff that's important to people.

                                                Esther Derby



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                                                Boris Gloger

                                                Vienna, Austria
                                                +43 699 1699 4977




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                                              • Mike Beedle
                                                ... there ... Ron: I agree, I have a feeling there are more than four :-) - Mike Programming Rant Programming is about creating emergent structure with an
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                                  Message
                                                   
                                                  RJ wrote:
                                                   >  I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that there
                                                   >  /are/ just four emotions.
                                                  Ron:
                                                   
                                                  I agree, I have a "feeling" there are more than four :-)
                                                   
                                                  - Mike
                                                   
                                                  "Programming Rant"
                                                   
                                                      Programming is about creating emergent structure with an evolving goal in mind.
                                                   
                                                    Programming is both about breaking existing symmetries and
                                                      spontaneously creating new symmetries.
                                                   
                                                    Programming is about the creation, evolution and anhilation of patterns
                                                    that serve as generators of software forms.
                                                   
                                                    Pattern languages are autocatalytic chains of generative rules that iteratively,
                                                      through the application of one pattern at a time, create new forms.
                                                   
                                                    Programming is about genetic-like trials and errors that maximize
                                                      a "fitness landscape" through better and better prototypes that
                                                    grow through a process similar to morphogenesis.  Testing simply
                                                    sets the expectation of what prototypes have minimally fulfilled
                                                    a utility function.
                                                   
                                                     Programming is self-organization that produces self-consistent knowledge structures.
                                                   
                                                    Programming is better served by multi-paradigmic programming-genetic pool that
                                                    includes constructs from all programming paradigms: logical, functional
                                                    and prescriptive (OO, structured, etc.).
                                                   
                                                   
                                                • Esther Derby
                                                  In a retro, I navigate the issue of naming emotions by using a seismograph. I draw line at neutral ( It s a job ) and then I have people draw their energy
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                                    In a retro, I navigate the issue of naming emotions by using a
                                                    seismograph. I draw line at neutral ("It's a job") and then I have
                                                    people draw their "energy" line over the course of the project relative
                                                    to that line.

                                                    It's not so critical that people name the emotions in the retrospective.
                                                    The strength of the emotional response gives me an idea of the
                                                    significance of events to the people on the team, and that generally
                                                    coincides with the juice, where there's potential for big learning.

                                                    I'm having a little trouble envisioning limiting the number of emotion
                                                    word choices in a check-in.

                                                    ED

                                                    Esther Derby
                                                    Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
                                                    Writer, Consultant, Facilitator:  Insights you can use...
                                                    612-724-8114 voice; 612-724-8115 fax
                                                    =====================================
                                                    Weblog: www.estherderby.com/weblog/blogger.html

                                                    Mark your calendar for the next AYE Conference: November 2004.
                                                    I'll add details as they become available.
                                                    www.ayeconference.com

                                                    > -----Original Message-----
                                                    > From: Diana Larsen [mailto:diana@...]
                                                    > Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 11:32 AM
                                                    > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] RE: scrum vision retrospective
                                                    >
                                                    > I don't debate the result, but I do find it interesting that we humans
                                                    > seem to have identified a 3:1 ratio of "negative" emotion to
                                                    "positive"
                                                    > ones. Why could it not be further reduced to: "I feel bad" "I feel
                                                    > good" if we take the collapsing to its logical conclusion?
                                                    >
                                                    > I wonder if it is where we put our attention - like people of the far
                                                    > North who reportedly have many more names for snow or we here in the
                                                    > Northwest who can distinguish numerous variations in the types of
                                                    rain.
                                                    > Do you suppose there would be more finesse to "gladness" if we really
                                                    > knew how to put our attention there? Or really found "positive"
                                                    emotion
                                                    > to be as interesting and informative about each other as "negative"
                                                    > ones? I myself find quite a difference between contentment and joy -
                                                    > and whether I am feeling one or the other would make a difference in
                                                    my
                                                    > work. Is anyone ready to put in the time to categorize and create a
                                                    > taxonomy of positive emotion to include at check in?
                                                    >
                                                    > Diana
                                                    >
                                                    > Diana Larsen
                                                    > www.industriallogic.com
                                                    > 503-288-3550
                                                    > ___
                                                    > Upcoming Class: "Facilitating Project Retrospectives and Reviews: A
                                                    > Practitioner's Toolkit" Jan. 22-23, 2004 at Oregon Graduate Institure
                                                    > ( http://cpd.ogi.edu/class.asp?n=04-pm-13 )
                                                    > I will be speaking at SD West, March 2004, http://www.sdexpo.com/
                                                    > Recent publications:
                                                    > Cutter IT Journal http://www.cutter.com/itjournal/change.html
                                                    >
                                                    > "Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived
                                                    forwards."
                                                    > Soren A. Kierkegaard (1813-1855)
                                                    >
                                                    > On Dec 15, 2003, at 8:34 AM, Linda Rising wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > > Wish I had said this :-)! What I saw at the McCarthy bootcamp was a
                                                    > > "protocol" -- where it was
                                                    > > easy to say how you felt without too much soul searching and also
                                                    easy
                                                    > > to get what others were
                                                    > > feeling -- it worked and then you could move on.
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Ron Jeffries wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > > On Monday, December 15, 2003, at 8:56:55 AM, Boris Gloger wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > > I read this, a view weeks ago - I found this concept quit
                                                    interesting,
                                                    > > BUT what i did not liked was the reduction of emotions to just 4.
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > > I mean we do have more feelings as Madness, Sadness, Gladness,
                                                    > > Afraidness - the McCarthies did a great job by saying that emotions
                                                    are
                                                    > > important. But the problem now is that we are reduced to four.
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > > The direction I like the way not.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > I'm sure they are not saying -- and that they did not say -- that
                                                    there
                                                    > > /are/ just four emotions.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > It's a communications trick, I would say, intended to focus our
                                                    > > attention
                                                    > > on those specific dimensions, to help get to the issues rather than
                                                    > > deal
                                                    > > with delicate nuances of feeling.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Ron Jeffries
                                                    > > www.XProgramming.com
                                                    > > There is really no such thing as bad weather,
                                                    > > only different kinds of good weather. ~John Ruskin
                                                    > >
                                                    >
                                                    >
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                                                  • Ken Schwaber
                                                    MessageI recently read The Tipping Point by Boris Gladwell and wonder what and when is the tipping point for agile methods and scrum project management? When
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                                      Message
                                                      I recently read "The Tipping Point" by Boris Gladwell and wonder what and when is the tipping point for agile methods and scrum project management? When will we have achieved the critical mass so that PMI teachings are "out of date" and "out of style"?
                                                       
                                                      Ken
                                                    • acockburn@aol.com
                                                      In a message dated 12/15/2003 3:26:06 PM Mountain Standard Time, derby@estherderby.com writes: I m having a little trouble envisioning limiting the number of
                                                      Message 26 of 28 , Dec 15, 2003
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                                                        In a message dated 12/15/2003 3:26:06 PM Mountain Standard Time, derby@... writes:

                                                        I'm having a little trouble envisioning limiting the number of emotion
                                                        word choices in a check-in.
                                                        ---> I did, too ... you have to try it to see it work
                                                         
                                                        ==============================================
                                                        Alistair Cockburn
                                                        "La perfection est atteinte non quand il ne reste rien a ajouter,
                                                        mais quand il ne reste rien a enlever." (Saint-Exupery)
                                                        ==============================================

                                                      • je@pfa.dk
                                                        If one in two Scrum Masters have the same positive experince of Scrum as I do, it should not be long. It is positive to see how Scrum Mastering classes are
                                                        Message 27 of 28 , Dec 16, 2003
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                                                          If one in two Scrum Masters have the same positive experince of Scrum
                                                          as I do, it should not be long.
                                                          It is positive to see how Scrum Mastering classes are increasing
                                                          rapidly.
                                                          Dare I hope somone has time to organize a Scrum conferance in 2004?
                                                          Jens


                                                          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Schwaber"
                                                          <ken.schwaber@v...> wrote:
                                                          > MessageI recently read "The Tipping Point" by Boris Gladwell and
                                                          wonder what
                                                          > and when is the tipping point for agile methods and scrum project
                                                          > management? When will we have achieved the critical mass so that PMI
                                                          > teachings are "out of date" and "out of style"?
                                                          >
                                                          > Ken
                                                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.