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Task planning vs. design

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  • Daniel Gackle
    Hi Boris, I want to address a specific point about planning in Scrum that you make ... The Scrum book calls for estimating tasks in hours. (We actually use the
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2003
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      Hi Boris,

      I want to address a specific point about planning in Scrum that you make
      here:

      > Why do you want to do detailed task planing? We do only the Sprint
      > Backlog [...] Everybody is assigned to a task and did a commitment to
      > deliver. So - do you do more? I would not think about a design issue
      > three weeks in advance. Why?

      The Scrum book calls for estimating tasks in hours. (We actually use the XP
      practice of estimating in relative units, not attempting to get hourly, but
      either way it's a pretty fine granularity.) That's part of a Scrum team's
      commitment to making its progress visible, no?

      Often, breaking tasks down to this level of granularity already requires
      some high-level design activity; hence, thinking about design issues three
      weeks in advance. That's part of what doesn't work for me as a developer. I
      like design and coding to be close together. It sets up a resonance effect
      that keeps momentum high. I also don't like to think about too many things
      at once; then I have a heavier mental load to carry, which slows me down.

      If I've got Scrum wrong here, I'd certainly like to know.

      > I think your problem is not the iteration time, but the "personality" of
      [your] team

      Absolutely. Adjusting iteration time is an attempt to adapt better to that
      personality.

      - Daniel
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