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Re: Scrum and Career Ladder

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  • Deb
    ... career ladder in companies that use Scrum? It s important to have a way to tie remuneration to work done... it s one of the satisfactions we earn from our
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 2003
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      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Mark McCain
      <xtremepm_2003@y...> wrote:
      > One of the issues I have been struggling with is how we setup a
      career ladder in companies that use Scrum?

      It's important to have a way to tie remuneration to work done... it's
      one of the satisfactions we earn from our work. But I associate the
      concept of "Career Ladder" with the Peter Principle... is there a
      more flexible, more "agile" metaphor we could use? I find "career
      path" equally troublesome. Both implicitly contain a "right" and
      a "wrong" direction in which to be moving... but in my experience,
      the best moves can sometimes be sideways.

      In an agile team, people are encouraged to find their "niche", and a
      niche well-filled is more valuable than many fancy job titles. And
      over time, niches will come and go, just as technologies and
      lifecycle stages do. I think there is a difficulty mapping to such
      linear metaphors from within the somewhat chaotic, "emergent" nature
      of agile teams.

      Is there some kind of organic metaphor can we use?

      - deb

      from: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language:
      Fourth Edition. 2000.

      Peter Principle, NOUN: The theory that employees within an
      organization will advance to their highest level of competence and
      then be promoted to and remain at a level at which they are
      incompetent.

      ETYMOLOGY: After Laurence Johnston Peter (1919┬ľ1990).
    • PaulOldfield1@compuserve.com
      ... Scott Ambler s concept of a Generalising Specialist may be pertinent here; one s knowledge becomes both broader and deeper as time progresses, becoming
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 1, 2003
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        >
        > (Deb)
        >
        > In an agile team, people are encouraged to find their "niche", and a
        > niche well-filled is more valuable than many fancy job titles. And
        > over time, niches will come and go, just as technologies and
        > lifecycle stages do. I think there is a difficulty mapping to such
        > linear metaphors from within the somewhat chaotic, "emergent"
        > nature of agile teams.
        >
        > Is there some kind of organic metaphor can we use?

        Scott Ambler's concept of a "Generalising Specialist" may be
        pertinent here; one's knowledge becomes both broader
        and deeper as time progresses, becoming more flexible
        and more generally useful by learning the basics of a broad
        range of skills, while also becoming more expert in a few
        specialisations. Perhaps the concept of progression from
        Apprentice through Journeyman to Master is appropriate,
        without specifying those topics in which one may become
        master.

        Paul Oldfield
        www.aptprocess.com
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