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Product-lines

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  • Jonas Bengtsson
    Hi all, I m going to write a paper about product-lines (for a course called product-line architecture). So I thought of writing about how product-lins are
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 20, 2002
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      Hi all,

      I'm going to write a paper about product-lines (for a course called
      product-line architecture). So I thought of writing about how product-lins
      are managed in agile development. Most literature I've read state that a
      planned BDUF is the only way to go.
      * Are there any articles etc that describes how to deal with product-lines
      in agile development?
      * Does anyone have any experiences with product-lines in agile development?

      Thanks in advance,
      Jonas
    • mpoppendieck
      Jonas, You might want to check out the following page, titled Lean Design , on my web site: http://www.poppendieck.com/design.htm A good article to check out
      Message 2 of 29 , Feb 21, 2002
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        Jonas,

        You might want to check out the following page, titled 'Lean
        Design', on my web site:

        http://www.poppendieck.com/design.htm

        A good article to check out is "How Microsoft Makes Large Teams Work
        Like Small Teams", Michael Cusumano, Sloan Management Review, Fall
        1997 which is an excerpt of the book "Microsoft Secrets" by the same
        author.

        Another good source of information is material on how Toyota does
        new product development. Since Toyota is by far the most agile
        automobile developer, I think you can learn a lot from how they
        develop products. Some of the more relevant articles are:

        The Second Toyota Paradox: How Delaying Decisions Can Make Better
        Cars Faster, Sloan Management Review, Spring `95, Allen Ward,
        Jeffrey Liker, John Cristiano, Durward Sobek

        Another Look at how Toyota Integrates Product Development, Durward
        Sobek, Jeffrey Liker, Allen Ward, Harvard Business Review, July-
        August, 1998.

        Toyota's Principles of Set-Based Concurrent Engineering, Sloan
        Management Review, Winter `99, Sobek, Allen, Liker

        You basically need access to a business library to get at these
        articles, but they are very good.

        --- In scrumdevelopment@y..., "Jonas Bengtsson" <jonas.b@h...> wrote:
        > Hi all,
        >
        > I'm going to write a paper about product-lines (for a course called
        > product-line architecture). So I thought of writing about how
        product-lins
        > are managed in agile development. Most literature I've read state
        that a
        > planned BDUF is the only way to go.
        > * Are there any articles etc that describes how to deal with
        product-lines
        > in agile development?
        > * Does anyone have any experiences with product-lines in agile
        development?
        >
        > Thanks in advance,
        > Jonas
      • Jonas Bengtsson
        Thank you Mary! I found all the articles except Another Look at how Toyota Integrates Product Development . I will look into all the articles later! /Jonas
        Message 3 of 29 , Feb 25, 2002
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          Thank you Mary!
          I found all the articles except "Another Look at how Toyota Integrates
          Product Development". I will look into all the articles later!

          /Jonas

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: mpoppendieck [mailto:mary@...]
          > Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2002 10:34 PM
          > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Product-lines
          >
          >
          > Jonas,
          >
          > You might want to check out the following page, titled 'Lean
          > Design', on my web site:
          >
          > http://www.poppendieck.com/design.htm
          >
          > A good article to check out is "How Microsoft Makes Large Teams Work
          > Like Small Teams", Michael Cusumano, Sloan Management Review, Fall
          > 1997 which is an excerpt of the book "Microsoft Secrets" by the same
          > author.
          >
          > Another good source of information is material on how Toyota does
          > new product development. Since Toyota is by far the most agile
          > automobile developer, I think you can learn a lot from how they
          > develop products. Some of the more relevant articles are:
          >
          > The Second Toyota Paradox: How Delaying Decisions Can Make Better
          > Cars Faster, Sloan Management Review, Spring `95, Allen Ward,
          > Jeffrey Liker, John Cristiano, Durward Sobek
          >
          > Another Look at how Toyota Integrates Product Development, Durward
          > Sobek, Jeffrey Liker, Allen Ward, Harvard Business Review, July-
          > August, 1998.
          >
          > Toyota's Principles of Set-Based Concurrent Engineering, Sloan
          > Management Review, Winter `99, Sobek, Allen, Liker
          >
          > You basically need access to a business library to get at these
          > articles, but they are very good.
          >
          > --- In scrumdevelopment@y..., "Jonas Bengtsson" <jonas.b@h...> wrote:
          > > Hi all,
          > >
          > > I'm going to write a paper about product-lines (for a course called
          > > product-line architecture). So I thought of writing about how
          > product-lins
          > > are managed in agile development. Most literature I've read state
          > that a
          > > planned BDUF is the only way to go.
          > > * Are there any articles etc that describes how to deal with
          > product-lines
          > > in agile development?
          > > * Does anyone have any experiences with product-lines in agile
          > development?
          > >
          > > Thanks in advance,
          > > Jonas
          >
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