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Re: [scrumdevelopment] How did you become a Coach?

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  • David H.
    ... Let s see... apart from my background and having been lucky enough to have had a mentor, I found this quite useful
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 28, 2007
      >
      >
      > I'm preparing to make the transition from Software Developer/Scrum Master to
      > Coach and while I've got a good grasp of Scrum/Lean/Agile etc. and have a
      > good sense of how to apply and diagnose problems. In my current part time
      > internal engagement I don't have a good sense of the mechanics of coaching.
      > I'm struggling to know when to ask a question of the team, when to talk to
      > the Scrum Master afterwards, etc.
      >
      Let's see... apart from my background and having been lucky enough to
      have had a mentor, I found this quite useful

      http://www.amazon.com/Harvard-Negotiation-Project/lm/R31ANWC68DEF9J

      Obviously I did not read all the books, but good coaching is about
      knowing how to communicate. When to alter the message and to
      anticipate communication noise. You can learn a lot from negotiation.

      -d


      --
      Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
      Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail accounts.

      "Therefore the considerations of the intelligent always include both
      benefit and harm." - Sun Tzu
    • Mark Levison
      ... David - thanks as ever for the speedy reply. Negotiation I d not even thought it from that angle. Did any of the books in that massive stack of twenty five
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 28, 2007
        On 6/28/07, David H. <dmalloc@...
        > wrote:
        Let's see... apart from my background and having been lucky enough to
        have had a mentor, I found this quite useful

        http://www.amazon.com/Harvard-Negotiation-Project/lm/R31ANWC68DEF9J

        Obviously I did not read all the books, but good coaching is about
        knowing how to communicate. When to alter the message and to
        anticipate communication noise. You can learn a lot from negotiation.

        David - thanks as ever for the speedy reply. Negotiation I'd not even thought it from that angle. Did any of the books in that massive stack of twenty five standout?

        Cheers
        Mark "Notes from a Tool User" Levison
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
        Most Popular posts:
        Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
        Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
        Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
        Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
      • Vic Williams
        Hi, Coaching can be a canned approach , akin to a sales approach, and/or it can be an adaptive - agile approach. Using one book is more likely to give you a
        Message 3 of 21 , Jun 28, 2007
          Hi,

          Coaching can be a 'canned approach', akin to a sales approach,
          and/or it can be an adaptive - agile approach.  Using one book
          is more likely to give you a less agile repertoire.

          You might also join the huge group at: 
          Training-Ideas@yahoogroups.com
          It's loaded with coaches-trainers-other erratas.
          Its files section might have 'all you need'.

          Mark Levison wrote:
          On 6/28/07, David H. <dmalloc@... > wrote:
          Let's see...   . . .  good coaching is about
          knowing how to communicate. When to alter the message and to
          anticipate communication noise. You can learn a lot from negotiation.
          ... Did any of the books in that massive stack of twenty five standout?
          bye,
          vic
          -- 
          “Innovation is the specific instrument of entrepreneurship -- the act that endows resources with a new capacity to create wealth." -- Peter Drucker
          Vic Williams – facilitating process, in China.
          Cell: 13168350975   Chinese (Tai tai) 13710878590
        • Vic Williams
          Hi, Coaching can be a canned approach , akin to a sales approach, and/or it can be an adaptive - agile approach. Using one book is more likely to give you a
          Message 4 of 21 , Jun 28, 2007
            Hi,

            Coaching can be a 'canned approach', akin to a sales approach,
            and/or it can be an adaptive - agile approach.  Using one book
            is more likely to give you a less agile repertoire.

            You might also join the huge group at: 
            Training-Ideas@yahoogroups.com
            It's loaded with coaches-trainers-other erratas.
            Its files section might have 'all you need'.

            Mark Levison wrote:
            On 6/28/07, David H. <dmalloc@... > wrote:
            Let's see...   . . .  good coaching is about
            knowing how to communicate. When to alter the message and to
            anticipate communication noise. You can learn a lot from negotiation.
            ... Did any of the books in that massive stack of twenty five standout?
            bye,
            vic
            -- 
            “Innovation is the specific instrument of entrepreneurship -- the act that endows resources with a new capacity to create wealth." -- Peter Drucker
            Vic Williams – facilitating process, in China.
            Cell: 13168350975   Chinese (Tai tai) 13710878590
          • Mark Levison
            ... Vic thanks for the quick reply. I m not looking for a canned approach - more a source book of ideas. ... I will join - hopefully its lower volume than this
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 28, 2007
              On 6/28/07, Vic Williams <process.facilitator@...> wrote:
              Hi,

              Coaching can be a 'canned approach', akin to a sales approach,
              and/or it can be an adaptive - agile approach.  Using one book
              is more likely to give you a less agile repertoire.

              Vic thanks for the quick reply. I'm not looking for a canned approach - more a source book of ideas.

              You might also join the huge group at: 
              Training-Ideas@yahoogroups.com
              It's loaded with coaches-trainers-other erratas.
              Its files section might have 'all you need'.

              I will join - hopefully its lower volume than this list.

              Cheers
              Mark

              ----------------------------------------------------------------------
              Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
              Most Popular posts:
              Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
              Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
              Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
              Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
            • Michael Spayd
              Hi Mark, The book that I would recommend about coaching in general is *Co-Active Coaching, 2nd Edition: New Skills for Coaching People Toward Success in Work
              Message 6 of 21 , Jun 28, 2007
                Hi Mark,
                 
                The book that I would recommend about coaching in general is Co-Active Coaching, 2nd Edition: New Skills for Coaching People Toward Success in Work and, Life at...
                It has nothing to do with Scrum or Agile, but everything to do with getting the best out of people with them setting their own agenda.
                 
                Cheers,
                 
                Michael
                 
                --
                Michael K. Spayd
                Cogility Consulting Solutions, LLC
                "Business Mind, Social Heart"
                michael.spayd@...
                720.300.5286

                "Leading Agile Enterprise Transformations"
                On 6/28/07, Mark Levison <mlevison@...> wrote:

                I'm preparing to make the transition from Software Developer/Scrum Master to Coach and while I've got a good grasp of Scrum/Lean/Agile etc. and have a good sense of how to apply and diagnose problems. In my current part time internal engagement I don't have a good sense of the mechanics of coaching. I'm struggling to know when to ask a question of the team, when to talk to the Scrum Master afterwards, etc.

                I wondering how did the other coaches on the list learn their craft? I don't have the luxury of watching another coach (there no others in the organisation). Nor do I have the budget to hire Mishkin or Pete to train me. If I'm lucky I might have enough training money to take Mishkin's Adult Education for Agile Coaches and Managers ( http://www.berteigconsulting.com/archives/2005/01/adult_education.php ) or maybe Coachville's ( http://www.coachville.com/home/index) .

                What did you do learn? Where they're any books that helped (I love books - they're cheap and they make you look you know something).

                Thanks
                Mark - who as usual is struggling to boot strap
                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                Most Popular posts:
                Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html




              • David H.
                ... From my perspecitve as a communications scientist coaching is nothing more than a very specialised form of negotiation. Just as sales is. We aim to
                Message 7 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                  > On 6/28/07, David H. <dmalloc@... > wrote:
                  > > Let's see... apart from my background and having been lucky enough to
                  > > have had a mentor, I found this quite useful
                  > >
                  > > http://www.amazon.com/Harvard-Negotiation-Project/lm/R31ANWC68DEF9J
                  > >
                  >
                  > David - thanks as ever for the speedy reply. Negotiation I'd not even
                  > thought it from that angle. Did any of the books in that massive stack of
                  > twenty five standout?
                  >
                  From my perspecitve as a communications scientist coaching is nothing
                  more than a very specialised form of negotiation. Just as sales is. We
                  aim to transport a certain set of information, we need to make sure,
                  negotiate, that the other party perceives them as valuable and
                  understands them as closely to what we mean them to be.

                  I loved reading:
                  Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
                  Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge
                  Smart Choices: A Practical Guide to Making Better Decisions
                  The Third Side: Why We Fight and How We Can Stop

                  Additional to that I loved:
                  Coaching ofr Performance (John Whitmore)
                  Influence - Sciene and Practice (Robert B. Caldini)
                  Personality Theories (Bem P. Allen but careful this one is very dry)


                  --
                  Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
                  Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail accounts.

                  "Therefore the considerations of the intelligent always include both
                  benefit and harm." - Sun Tzu
                • Nicholas Cancelliere
                  I was a technical lead / tech project manager before becoming a Scrum Master. The biggest challenge for me was letting go of control and not leading directly.
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007

                    I was a technical lead / tech project manager before becoming a Scrum Master.  The biggest challenge for me was letting go of control and not leading directly.  I would recommend reading books about team evolution, dynamics and servant leadership.  Anything that teaches these concepts would be good to read.

                    As a Scrum Master you shouldn't be directly leading the team, but instead operate as a servant leader.  Your job is to enable everyone to do their best thinking and contribute their talents to maximum effect.  Keep distractions away from the team (both internal and external), bring best practices, and help the team achieve their best.  Provide the Team opportunities to self-manage and self-organize, do everything you can to support them to this end.

                    It's not an easy job, and can be frustrating at times - like raising kids sometimes, but stick with it and the results can be rewarding.

                    Nicholas


                    On Jun 28, 2007, at 6:22 PM, Mark Levison wrote:

                    I'm preparing to make the transition from Software Developer/Scrum Master to Coach and while I've got a good grasp of Scrum/Lean/Agile etc. and have a good sense of how to apply and diagnose problems. In my current part time internal engagement I don't have a good sense of the mechanics of coaching. I'm struggling to know when to ask a question of the team, when to talk to the Scrum Master afterwards, etc.

                    I wondering how did the other coaches on the list learn their craft? I don't have the luxury of watching another coach (there no others in the organisation). Nor do I have the budget to hire Mishkin or Pete to train me. If I'm lucky I might have enough training money to take Mishkin's Adult Education for Agile Coaches and Managers ( http://www.berteigconsulting.com/archives/2005/01/adult_education.php) or maybe Coachville's ( http://www.coachville.com/home/index) .

                    What did you do learn? Where they're any books that helped (I love books - they're cheap and they make you look you know something).

                    Thanks
                    Mark - who as usual is struggling to boot strap
                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                    Most Popular posts:
                    Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                    Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                    Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                    Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html

                    ---
                    Nicholas Cancelliere
                    Austin, TX


                  • William Wake
                    ... Mentoring, practicing, and a lot of self-reflection (e.g., journaling). I do a lot of reading as well (but particularly in this area, at least for me,
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                      > I wondering how did the other coaches on the list learn their craft?
                       
                      Mentoring, practicing, and a lot of self-reflection (e.g., journaling). 
                       
                      I do a lot of reading as well (but particularly in this area, at least for me, reading without practicing isn't enough). I have short reviews of coaching books I've found useful at < http://www.xp123.com/books/coach/> and a list Ron Jeffries and I put together at <http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0307/index.shtml> I don't restrict myself to coaching per se; I've found benefit in lean systems, management, linguistics, game design, etc.
                       
                      I look for opportunities to write and to teach (especially with someone else) as that helps me learn. I take what classes I can (either locally or at conferences). For example, I've enjoyed classes on improv and facilitation.
                       
                      Good luck!
                        Bill Wake

                      --
                         Bill Wake  William.Wake@...  www.xp123.com
                    • Mark Levison
                      ... Thanks for the reply Nicholas - to clarify I m already a scrum master and believe I succeed fairly well on that front. I m preparing to move into a
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                        On 6/29/07, Nicholas Cancelliere <nickaustin74@...> wrote:

                        I was a technical lead / tech project manager before becoming a Scrum Master.  The biggest challenge for me was letting go of control and not leading directly.  I would recommend reading books about team evolution, dynamics and servant leadership.  Anything that teaches these concepts would be good to read.

                        Thanks for the reply Nicholas - to clarify I'm already a scrum master and believe I succeed fairly well on that front. I'm preparing to move into a coaching role where I will coach the scrum master, their management and occasionally if it will provide value the team.

                        I'm finding the lessons I've learned coaching my own team don't always help in trying to get senior management to step back from micro-management. So its time to learn a new set of communication (or perhaps negotiation) skills to help people ease into their new roles.

                        Cheers
                        Mark
                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                        Most Popular posts:
                        Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                        Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                        Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                        Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
                      • Mark Levison
                        ... Yes I m quickly coming to realise this ... Its funny I tried this one and it didn t resonate - time to try again. Smart Choices: A Practical Guide to
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                          On 6/29/07, David H. <dmalloc@...> wrote:
                          From my perspecitve as a communications scientist coaching is nothing
                          more than a very specialised form of negotiation. Just as sales is. We
                          aim to transport a certain set of information, we need to make sure,
                          negotiate, that the other party perceives them as valuable and
                          understands them as closely to what we mean them to be.

                          Yes I'm quickly coming to realise this

                          I loved reading:
                          Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
                          Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge

                          Its funny I tried this one and it didn't resonate - time to try again.

                          Smart Choices: A Practical Guide to Making Better Decisions
                          The Third Side: Why We Fight and How We Can Stop

                          Additional to that I loved:
                          Coaching ofr Performance (John Whitmore)
                          Influence - Sciene and Practice (Robert B. Caldini)

                          Ahhh - possibly the most interesting book I've read in the past two years. I liked it so much I wrote a series of blog posts about the book
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2006/10/influence_why_a.html
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2006/11/influence_scien.html
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2006/11/why_are_we_so_e.html

                          I gave up before finishing the series because I wasn't gaining the fame and fortune I was looking for.

                          Personality Theories (Bem P. Allen but careful this one is very dry)

                          Thanks
                          Mark
                          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                          Most Popular posts:
                          Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                          Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                          Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                          Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                          http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
                        • Mark Levison
                          ... Mentoring - I m looking but thats going to be tough - there are no role models to my knowledge (our development organization is 1500+). Practice and
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                            On 6/29/07, William Wake <william.wake@...> wrote:
                            > I wondering how did the other coaches on the list learn their craft?
                             
                            Mentoring, practicing, and a lot of self-reflection (e.g., journaling). 

                            Mentoring - I'm looking but thats going to be tough - there are no role models to my knowledge (our development organization is 1500+). Practice and self-reflection - I will doing alot of both.

                            I do a lot of reading as well (but particularly in this area, at least for me, reading without practicing isn't enough). I have short reviews of coaching books I've found useful at < http://www.xp123.com/books/coach/> and a list Ron Jeffries and I put together at <http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0307/index.shtml > I don't restrict myself to coaching per se; I've found benefit in lean systems, management, linguistics, game design, etc.

                            Those two lists cover a lot of books - life is short and I can't read all of the books in question. Are there a few that standout?

                            I look for opportunities to write and to teach (especially with someone else) as that helps me learn. I take what classes I can (either locally or at conferences). For example, I've enjoyed classes on improv and facilitation.

                            Well I think the mailing list knows I do alot of writing (in fact some are heartily sick of list of articles in my sig), but courses are always interesting. Are there any at Agile 2007 that have caught your eye?

                            Cheers
                            Mark Levison
                            ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                            Most Popular posts:
                            Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                            http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                            Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                            http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                            Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                            http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                            Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                            http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
                          • Nicholas Cancelliere
                            In that case you might have to challenge their thinking. Get them to start to think of things in new ways and get them to question why they have always been
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007

                              In that case you might have to challenge their thinking.  Get them to start to think of things in new ways and get them to question why they have always been doing things how they have.

                              I don't see how it would be too much different, other than you have to translate your experience to them.  Try to get them to understand servant leadership, and what it means to be a servant leader.  How to provide opportunities for their teams to be successful - and to let the teams fail sometimes to learn lessons.

                              Although I have no direct experience training Scrum Masters ... I'm working up towards that!  Let me know what challenges you run into and how you overcome them, I'd be interested in hearing about that.

                              Nicholas



                              On Jun 29, 2007, at 8:49 AM, Mark Levison wrote:



                              On 6/29/07, Nicholas Cancelliere <nickaustin74@...> wrote:

                              I was a technical lead / tech project manager before becoming a Scrum Master.  The biggest challenge for me was letting go of control and not leading directly.  I would recommend reading books about team evolution, dynamics and servant leadership.  Anything that teaches these concepts would be good to read.

                              Thanks for the reply Nicholas - to clarify I'm already a scrum master and believe I succeed fairly well on that front. I'm preparing to move into a coaching role where I will coach the scrum master, their management and occasionally if it will provide value the team.

                              I'm finding the lessons I've learned coaching my own team don't always help in trying to get senior management to step back from micro-management. So its time to learn a new set of communication (or perhaps negotiation) skills to help people ease into their new roles.

                              Cheers
                              Mark
                              ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                              Most Popular posts:
                              Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                              Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                              Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                              Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                              http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html

                              ---
                              Nicholas Cancelliere
                              Austin, TX


                            • William Wake
                              ... Some I particularly like: The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think In Action, Donald Schön. Mastery: The Keys to Success and Long-Term
                              Message 14 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                                On 6/29/07, Mark Levison <mlevison@...> wrote:
                                > Are there a few that standout?

                                Some I particularly like:

                                The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think In Action, Donald Schön.

                                Mastery: The Keys to Success and Long-Term Fulfillment, George Leonard.

                                Gerald Weinberg's stuff - Quality software management, Secrets of
                                Consulting, etc.


                                > Are there any at Agile 2007 that have caught your eye?
                                I haven't even looked yet. (Since you don't have to pre-register for
                                the courses, I haven't worried about it:)

                                --
                                Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com
                                Hiring software testers in Ann Arbor, MI
                              • Michael Spayd
                                Mark, you asked if there are a few books that standout. I would say you are pointing out what I believe is a serious lack within the Agile community: a book on
                                Message 15 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                                  Mark, you asked if there are a few books that standout. I would say you are pointing out what I believe is a serious lack within the Agile community: a book on how to actually do coaching of Agile teams and Agile managers. There are books outsside Agile that tell you how to coach as a manager, how to be a servant leader, but not inside of Agile. There are fundamentally only methodology books (sorry for using the M word) and tool books and philosophy books. The one exception that comes to mind that I forgot to mention and noone has that I have seen is Jean Tabaka's book Collaboration Explained ( http://www.amazon.com/Collaboration-Explained-Facilitation-Software-Development/dp/0321268776 ).
                                   
                                  If you know Jean, she is the embodiment of servant-leadership and she conveys this in her book. Facilitation is one very important skill of the Agile coach and manager. Almost no one in the Agile world teaches coaches how to facilitate, which they need to know. I commend it to you highly.
                                   
                                  That being said, facilitation is only one skill of a great coach. Another is the ability to call forth the greatness of a team. This is a natural talent to some extent, but can certainly be learned. The book I previously mentioned by Laura Whitworth on coaching people will teach you about that on the invididual level. I don't (yet) know a book that really teaches that on the team entity level, and certianly not specifically in the Agile space.
                                   
                                  I feel sure that book is under development somewhere right now (under non-disclosure no doubt). It also lives inside me and some others I know, but I don't have the time right now (or the collaborator).
                                   
                                  Thanks for bringing this important topic to our attention and being willing to say you want to grow in this space.
                                   
                                  Michael


                                  --
                                  Michael K. Spayd
                                  Cogility Consulting Solutions, LLC
                                  "Business Mind, Social Heart"
                                  michael.spayd@...
                                  720.300.5286

                                  "Leading Agile Enterprise Transformations"
                                   
                                   
                                  On 6/29/07, Mark Levison <mlevison@...> wrote:



                                  On 6/29/07, William Wake <william.wake@... > wrote:
                                  > I wondering how did the other coaches on the list learn their craft?
                                   
                                  Mentoring, practicing, and a lot of self-reflection (e.g., journaling). 

                                  Mentoring - I'm looking but thats going to be tough - there are no role models to my knowledge (our development organization is 1500+). Practice and self-reflection - I will doing alot of both.
                                   

                                  I do a lot of reading as well (but particularly in this area, at least for me, reading without practicing isn't enough). I have short reviews of coaching books I've found useful at < http://www.xp123.com/books/coach/> and a list Ron Jeffries and I put together at <http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0307/index.shtml > I don't restrict myself to coaching per se; I've found benefit in lean systems, management, linguistics, game design, etc.

                                  Those two lists cover a lot of books - life is short and I can't read all of the books in question. Are there a few that standout?
                                   

                                  I look for opportunities to write and to teach (especially with someone else) as that helps me learn. I take what classes I can (either locally or at conferences). For example, I've enjoyed classes on improv and facilitation.

                                  Well I think the mailing list knows I do alot of writing (in fact some are heartily sick of list of articles in my sig), but courses are always interesting. Are there any at Agile 2007 that have caught your eye?

                                  Cheers
                                  Mark Levison
                                   
                                  ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                                  Most Popular posts:
                                  Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                                  http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                                  Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                                  http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                                  Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                                  http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                                  Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                                  http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html


                                • Mark Levison
                                  ... Oh this I know. To this point my biggest weakness is communication (especially subtlety). I m also not quite in the position yet - I ve probably got 4-6
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                                    On 6/29/07, Nicholas Cancelliere <nickaustin74@...> wrote:

                                    In that case you might have to challenge their thinking.  Get them to start to think of things in new ways and get them to question why they have always been doing things how they have.

                                    Oh this I know. To this point my biggest weakness is communication (especially subtlety). I'm also not quite in the position yet - I've probably got 4-6 months before it becomes a part time job. Maybe 18 months until it becomes a full time job,

                                    I don't see how it would be too much different, other than you have to translate your experience to them.  Try to get them to understand servant leadership, and what it means to be a servant leader.  How to provide opportunities for their teams to be successful - and to let the teams fail sometimes to learn lessons.

                                    Although I have no direct experience training Scrum Masters ... I'm working up towards that!  Let me know what challenges you run into and how you overcome them, I'd be interested in hearing about that.

                                    Oh you will be hearing - mostly in the form of questions as I face challenges.

                                    Cheers
                                    Mark
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                                    Most Popular posts:
                                    Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                                    Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                                    Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                                    Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                                    http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
                                  • Mark Levison
                                    ... Thats funny it had been on my mental to read list for a while. It would ve been at the front expect that I thought I should patch over my complete lack of
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                                      On 6/29/07, Michael Spayd <michael.spayd@...> wrote:
                                      Mark, you asked if there are a few books that standout. I would say you are pointing out what I believe is a serious lack within the Agile community: a book on how to actually do coaching of Agile teams and Agile managers. There are books outsside Agile that tell you how to coach as a manager, how to be a servant leader, but not inside of Agile. There are fundamentally only methodology books (sorry for using the M word) and tool books and philosophy books. The one exception that comes to mind that I forgot to mention and noone has that I have seen is Jean Tabaka's book Collaboration Explained ( http://www.amazon.com/Collaboration-Explained-Facilitation-Software-Development/dp/0321268776  ).

                                      Thats funny it had been on my mental to read list for a while. It would've been at the front expect that I thought I should patch over my complete lack of coaching knowledge before specializing. It feels a bit like reading one of Mike's books on planning before you've done any agile reading or have any experience. The ideas all make sense but you may lack the framework to put them in.

                                      If you know Jean, she is the embodiment of servant-leadership and she conveys this in her book. Facilitation is one very important skill of the Agile coach and manager. Almost no one in the Agile world teaches coaches how to facilitate, which they need to know. I commend it to you highly.

                                      I've never had the privilege - but I'm hoping to correct that mistake in August.

                                      That being said, facilitation is only one skill of a great coach. Another is the ability to call forth the greatness of a team. This is a natural talent to some extent, but can certainly be learned. The book I previously mentioned by Laura Whitworth on coaching people will teach you about that on the invididual level. I don't (yet) know a book that really teaches that on the team entity level, and certianly not specifically in the Agile space.
                                       
                                      I feel sure that book is under development somewhere right now (under non-disclosure no doubt).

                                      On the off chance that's true and its author is reading the mailing list - I want to be a reviewer.
                                       
                                      It also lives inside me and some others I know, but I don't have the time right now (or the collaborator).
                                       
                                      Thanks for bringing this important topic to our attention and being willing to say you want to grow in this space.

                                      Anytime - its a fun game for all of us.

                                      Cheers
                                      Mark
                                      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                                      Most Popular posts:
                                      Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                                      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                                      Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                                      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                                      Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                                      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                                      Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                                      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
                                    • Michael Spayd
                                      So, thanks Mark for bringing this topic up. As it turns out, I decided to call the person whom I was most thinking about collaborating on to write this book
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                                        So, thanks Mark for bringing this topic up. As it turns out, I decided to call the person whom I was most thinking about collaborating on to write this book and he was thinking of the same thing. Keep in touch. We may well need quite a few reviewers if we decide to commit to the project.
                                         
                                        Good luck in your growth path!
                                         
                                         
                                        Michael


                                         
                                        On 6/29/07, Mark Levison <mlevison@...> wrote:



                                        On 6/29/07, Michael Spayd < michael.spayd@...> wrote:
                                        Mark, you asked if there are a few books that standout. I would say you are pointing out what I believe is a serious lack within the Agile community: a book on how to actually do coaching of Agile teams and Agile managers. There are books outsside Agile that tell you how to coach as a manager, how to be a servant leader, but not inside of Agile. There are fundamentally only methodology books (sorry for using the M word) and tool books and philosophy books. The one exception that comes to mind that I forgot to mention and noone has that I have seen is Jean Tabaka's book Collaboration Explained ( http://www.amazon.com/Collaboration-Explained-Facilitation-Software-Development/dp/0321268776  ).

                                        Thats funny it had been on my mental to read list for a while. It would've been at the front expect that I thought I should patch over my complete lack of coaching knowledge before specializing. It feels a bit like reading one of Mike's books on planning before you've done any agile reading or have any experience. The ideas all make sense but you may lack the framework to put them in.
                                         

                                        If you know Jean, she is the embodiment of servant-leadership and she conveys this in her book. Facilitation is one very important skill of the Agile coach and manager. Almost no one in the Agile world teaches coaches how to facilitate, which they need to know. I commend it to you highly.

                                        I've never had the privilege - but I'm hoping to correct that mistake in August.
                                         

                                        That being said, facilitation is only one skill of a great coach. Another is the ability to call forth the greatness of a team. This is a natural talent to some extent, but can certainly be learned. The book I previously mentioned by Laura Whitworth on coaching people will teach you about that on the invididual level. I don't (yet) know a book that really teaches that on the team entity level, and certianly not specifically in the Agile space.
                                         
                                        I feel sure that book is under development somewhere right now (under non-disclosure no doubt).

                                        On the off chance that's true and its author is reading the mailing list - I want to be a reviewer.
                                         
                                        It also lives inside me and some others I know, but I don't have the time right now (or the collaborator).
                                         
                                        Thanks for bringing this important topic to our attention and being willing to say you want to grow in this space.

                                        Anytime - its a fun game for all of us.

                                        Cheers
                                        Mark

                                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                                        Most Popular posts:
                                        Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                                        Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                                        Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                                        Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                                        http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html




                                        --
                                        Michael K. Spayd
                                        Cogility Consulting Solutions, LLC
                                        "Business Mind, Social Heart"
                                        michael.spayd@...
                                        720.300.5286

                                        "Leading Agile Enterprise Transformations"
                                      • Pete Behrens
                                        Mark, For me personally, it was a multitude of experiences. Having a basis as a developer, manager, and leader; having experience with multiple types of
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Jun 29, 2007
                                          Mark,

                                          For me personally, it was a multitude of experiences. Having a basis
                                          as a developer, manager, and leader; having experience with multiple
                                          types of processes (RAD, RUP, Waterfall, Scrum) and with a process
                                          company (Rational); and having access to an executive coach during
                                          one of my leadership positions.

                                          In addition, I seek out material (books, speakers, conferences,
                                          blogs, etc.) across multiple disciplines including leadership,
                                          management, consulting, teams, organizational development, change
                                          management, project management, marketing, product management,
                                          sports, development, testing, etc.

                                          Although coaching my boys through sports has been as enlightening to
                                          me as my professional work :)

                                          Coaching doesn't need to be a position, but rather can be a role that
                                          anyone can play in any position they are at within a team. The same
                                          is true for leadership. You can practice coaching (leading) as a
                                          developer on your team. Develop an expertise and share it with
                                          others. Take an initiative. Spend time on your own development.

                                          If you wait for a title to behave as that title you will rarely make
                                          it there - rather if your act and behave what you want to become,
                                          titles become somewhat irrelevant.

                                          Hope that helps,
                                          Pete

                                          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison"
                                          <mlevison@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I'm preparing to make the transition from Software Developer/Scrum
                                          Master to
                                          > Coach and while I've got a good grasp of Scrum/Lean/Agile etc. and
                                          have a
                                          > good sense of how to apply and diagnose problems. In my current
                                          part time
                                          > internal engagement I don't have a good sense of the mechanics of
                                          coaching.
                                          > I'm struggling to know when to ask a question of the team, when to
                                          talk to
                                          > the Scrum Master afterwards, etc.
                                          >
                                          > I wondering how did the other coaches on the list learn their
                                          craft? I don't
                                          > have the luxury of watching another coach (there no others in the
                                          > organisation). Nor do I have the budget to hire Mishkin or Pete to
                                          train me.
                                          > If I'm lucky I might have enough training money to take Mishkin's
                                          Adult
                                          > Education for Agile Coaches and Managers (
                                          >
                                          http://www.berteigconsulting.com/archives/2005/01/adult_education.php)
                                          or
                                          > maybe Coachville's (http://www.coachville.com/home/index) .
                                          >
                                          > What did you do learn? Where they're any books that helped (I love
                                          books -
                                          > they're cheap and they make you look you know something).
                                          >
                                          > Thanks
                                          > Mark - who as usual is struggling to boot strap
                                          > --------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          --
                                          > Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                                          > Most Popular posts:
                                          > Does Scrum Work? Hell Yes!!! Why?
                                          > http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/does-scrum-work.html
                                          > Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons
                                          > http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html
                                          > Scrum in a Nutshell Presentation
                                          > http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/05/scrum_in_a_nuts.html
                                          > Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks
                                          > http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html
                                          >
                                        • Alan Shalloway
                                          I just wrote a blog on this at http://blogs.netobjectives.com/ It also links to 3 essential books I consider necessary for all coaches to read. Alan Shalloway
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Jun 30, 2007
                                            I just wrote a blog on this at http://blogs.netobjectives.com/
                                            It also links to 3 essential books I consider necessary for all
                                            coaches to read.

                                            Alan Shalloway
                                            CEO, Net Objectives
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