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Re: Bugs from previous Iteration

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  • Kane Mar
    ... Ideally I would want to prevent this from happening. There are some concrete steps I personally take to achieve this: 1. Have a discussion with the team
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 1, 2007
      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Kier" <kieroneil@...> wrote:
      >
      > Let's say that an iteration is complete and delivered to customers.
      >
      > While working on the next iteration several bug reports come in from
      > the delivered code.

      Ideally I would want to prevent this from happening. There are some
      concrete steps I personally take to achieve this:

      1. Have a discussion with the team about what "Done" means. I would
      suggest that the definition of "Done" (at the very least) include:
      Analysis, design, coding, testing and some level of end-to-end
      functionality testing. In other words, all those activities need to be
      included for something to be considered "Done".

      2. Introduce the concept of "No new bugs for any new functionality".
      In other words new functionality is only considered "Done" if there
      are no outstanding bugs.

      Adopting both of these steps will force the team to change it's
      behaviour. In order to achieve these goals the testers will need to
      get involved earlier and it will force the developers to deliver
      earlier and more often.

      Please keep us informed of your progress and what works for you.

      Best regards,
      Kane Mar
      B: http://www.KaneMar.com
      W: http://www.Danube.com
    • Kier
      Dave et al, The real problem is that we don t have our customers as involved as we should. Our BA s talk to our customers and our PO talks to our Sales &
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 1, 2007
        Dave et al,
        The real problem is that we don't have our customers as involved as we
        should. Our BA's talk to our customers and our PO talks to our Sales
        & Marketing folks to determine user needs.

        We are just now heading into our first iteration using scrum so it is
        possible that the usual post-release bugs will not materialize using
        the Scrum methodology.
        In Waterfall it was inevitable that there would be a handful of tweaks
        to be made post-delivery.

        On this particular product we also have no automated testing either.
        One of these days ...

        Cheers,
        Kier
        Jacksonville, FL
      • Nicholas Cancelliere
        This depends on how bad the bug is. Is your customer willing to wait until the defect is planned, to be worked on. Or are they so angry they re ready to quit
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 5, 2007

          This depends on how bad the bug is.  Is your customer willing to wait until the defect is planned, to be worked on.  Or are they so angry they're ready to quit tomorrow?

          In any case you'll have to end up dealing with the defect (either unplanned in the current iteration, or planned in the next).  Defects become a "debt" on your productivity, and if the quality is poor you'll find yourself scheduling more defects than features (or your velocity is lower because in a given sprint there are any number of unplanned defects to be worked on).

          Do you usually have a lot of in-production defects?  Are they usually critical or just minor things?  Do you practice TDD or any XP methods that might help reduce the errors in production?

          Nicholas



          On May 31, 2007, at 6:02 PM, Kier wrote:

          Let's say that an iteration is complete and delivered to customers.

          While working on the next iteration several bug reports come in from
          the delivered code.

          Should we fix those in the current iteration even though they weren't
          planned or should we wait and prioritize them in the next iteration.

          I was thinking that I could have a Programmer and BA in reserve to
          handle such issues.

          Please give your opinions...

          Sincerely,
          Kier
          Jacksonville, FL


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