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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Scrummaster NOT part of the Team? (Is SM a Chicken Or a Pig?)

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  • Nicholas Cancelliere
    To me that chart shows a potential growth plan for someone who is a project manager and is transitioning into the scurmmaster role - as the team itself is
    Message 1 of 23 , May 1, 2007

      To me that chart shows a potential growth plan for someone who is a project manager and is transitioning into the scurmmaster role - as the team itself is evolving to be more Agile.  Keep in mind though that the PM isn't always the place a scrummaster is born.  Sometimes they come out of QA.  Sometimes they're hired from the outside.

      I couldn't say though at in R1 or even R2 you have a "scrummaster" - you really have a project manager, by another name.  It isn't until you get to the point where their is more coaching, facilitation and less command and control that you're moving out of the project manager role and into the scrummaster role.

      Nicholas


      On May 1, 2007, at 10:52 AM, dnicolet99 wrote:

      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Cancelliere
      <nickaustin74@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > I guess the reason I ask the question is I'm trying to understand if
      > the team is unwilling and unable because what they do right now is
      > working. In other words I wouldn't want to get into a situation
      > where the team was performing fine, but the management wanted to
      > force them to use Scrum because it's the hot thing to do right now in
      > software development. I would lead the team into understanding what
      > Agile methods are and why they're beneficial, and then suggest that
      > Scrum is a way to implement (along with some XP practices).

      That makes a lot of sense to me. There's always the question of what
      they mean by "working." There's always room for improvement.

      >
      > I honestly would avoid the above scenario if possible (just because
      > someone wants to hire me doesn't me I have to work for them), that or
      > want a lot of money - because that is going to be a big headache.

      True. Some people are interested in bringing agile into non-agile
      organizations, and others are interested in putting agile practices to
      work in organizations that already understand the benefits.

      > If
      > the team was not performing well, then that gives me something to
      > work with - because I believe people in general want do do a good job
      > and perform, and I assume such a team was looking for help (willing,
      > but not yet able).
      >
      > In the R1 scenario where the team is unwilling and unable ... my
      > first order of business would be to discover the root cause for being
      > unwilling, then work on education and coaching. Maybe I convince
      > them to adopt a product backlog and gross estimates and start
      > tracking a burndown on completed features. Then next I might have
      > them plan their own release. Then later get them to plan iterations
      > inside that release, etc. These are only examples, I don't think
      > there is a set prescription for any team. I have coached 4 teams
      > over the past 2 years and they were all different in their adoption.
      > All teams start at different levels of experience and have different
      > organizational pressures, etc. With any adoption you don't want to
      > rush them, take baby steps and let them come to their own
      > conclusions. Be there as a coach and help offer advice, best
      > practices, challenge their thinking - get them to open up to
      > different perspectives. I know I've done my job when I'm no longer
      > needed and the team is essentially running itself, that means I did a
      > good job.
      >
      > At no point though do I act as a project manager or their boss,
      > that'd be setting a bad example.
      >
      > Nicholas
      >
      >
      >
      > On May 1, 2007, at 8:55 AM, dnicolet99 wrote:
      >
      > > Yes, in that case you have a bigger problem, but it's a common
      > > situation. So, I understand your answer to be as follows: If you were
      > > assigned to be a ScrumMaster on a team like that, your first order of
      > > business would be to help the team members understand the benefits of
      > > agile. Your comment suggests your first step would be to try and
      > > understand why they are unwilling or unable. Is that correct?
      > >
      > > As to "why are you implementing Scrum", that's a different issue. The
      > > world is full of teams that don't know how to self-manage. It's the
      > > status quo. In the context of the R1 scenario, the "why" is that
      > > "someone" (the company's management) has decided Scrum is the right
      > > way to go. In the context of my question, "someone" (you) has been
      > > hired for the ScrumMaster role. The situation on the ground on Day One
      > > is what it is. The question is what will the ScrumMaster do about it,
      > > above and beyond just saying that there's no way for him to "be" a
      > > ScrumMaster?
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Nicholas Cancelliere
      > > <nickaustin74@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On a team unable or unwilling to use Scrum ... then I'm not a
      > > > Scrummaster, not for that team. Why are you implementing Scrum for a
      > > > team that's unwilling or unable to manage or direct themselves? If
      > > > the team doesn't want to use Scrum then you can't be a Scrummaster
      > > > for them.
      > > >
      > > > At that stage you have a bigger problem -- that is just getting the
      > > > team to recognize the benefits of Agile. Why is the team unwilling
      > > > or unable?
      > > >
      > > > Nicholas
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On Apr 24, 2007, at 6:24 PM, dnicolet99 wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Nicholas Cancelliere"
      > > > > <nickaustin74@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > We do not use command and
      > > > > > control to organize teams. We instead coach and use servant
      > > > > leadership
      > > > > > tactics to organize teams. In the example you cited I'd argue
      > > that
      > > > > in R1
      > > > > > you don't have a Scrum team or a Scrummaster. R1 describes the
      > > > > state of any
      > > > > > software team Agile or not. Now saying the team's goal is to
      > > get to
      > > > > R4 or
      > > > > > beyond then you have a waterfall team trying to become Agile.
      > > > >
      > > > > Can you imagine any ways in which you might be able to guide the
      > > > > development of such a team if you found yourself in the
      > > position of
      > > > > ScrumMaster in an R1 situation?
      > > > >
      > > > > Dave
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >


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