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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Agile and 6 Sigma

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  • Eric Johnson
    From a root philosophy standpoint, I tend to agree with Alistair. Six Sigma tends to emphasize rigorous documentation and quantifiable measurements -- even
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 1, 2003
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      From a root philosophy standpoint, I tend to agree with Alistair.
      Six Sigma tends to emphasize rigorous documentation and
      quantifiable measurements -- even when developing the
      documentation and analysis delivers little real value. This is,
      of course, directly opposed to the philosophy of developing the
      minimum documentation, code, etc, required to confidently
      deliver the product.

      That said, I think it is possible to map XP@Scrum activities into
      a Six Sigma DMADV framework. I haven't fully thought this
      through, but I've been kicking it around for a while. Any comments
      are most welcome.

      Sigma DMADV Phases & XP/Scrum Deliverables
      ========================================

      Iteration X

      DEFINE
      - User Stories
      - Functional Requirements
      - Non-Functional Requirements
      - Product Backlog
      - Committed Sprint Backlog
      - Management Tests (from industrialXP)
      - Acceptance Tests

      MEASURE
      - Management Tests (current state)
      - Sprint Backlog Burndown

      ANALYZE
      - Customer/Developer Design Sessions
      - Alternate Design Concepts
      - Prototypes (paper, code, etc)

      DESIGN
      - Unit Tests
      - Working Code
      - Design Documentation (as appropriate)

      VERIFY
      - Acceptance Tests (outcomes)
      - Management Tests (outcomes)
      - Customer Feedback
      - Sprint Review Meeting

      Then loop-back and repeat for the next iteration.

      I think this mapping could work in a Sigma organization,
      provided the Master Black Belts understand the reason
      for taking an "inspect and adapt" approach like XP@Scrum.
      Since Sigma came out of a manufacturing environment,
      many MBBs may be able to see the correlations between
      Scrum and industrial process control theory (maybe Ken
      or someone else can expound further on the connections?).

      Hope this helps.

      --EJ

      http://home.ricochet.com/eric.r.johnson/




      >From: acockburn@...
      >Reply-To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      >To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Agile and 6 Sigma
      >Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 11:40:12 EDT
      >
      >In a message dated 9/30/2003 9:34:30 AM Mountain Daylight Time,
      >McClintock_Mike_G@... writes:
      >I've had great success with Agile, and wish to continue developing in
      >this manner, however the 6 Sigma wave is upon us. My concerns on how
      >well these 2 methodologies can integrate are increasing. Has anyone
      >found a way to merge the 2 or experimented on weather the 2 can
      >coexist.
      >
      >Thanks in advance for your replies,
      >---> My take is that there is a fundamental opposition to the two.
      >
      >Some agile techniques can be used anyway, but the *intention* or value of
      >staying agile and the intention or value of being correct lead to different
      >development strategies.
      >
      >See
      >http://alistair.cockburn.us/crystal/articles/adjtwbc/agiledevjoinsthewouldbecrowdcitj0102.pdf
      >for a discussion.
      >
      >==============================================
      >Dr. Alistair Cockburn
      >President, Humans and Technology
      >Program Director, Agile Development Conference
      >(http://AgileDevelopmentConference.com)
      >
      >http://alistair.cockburn.us alistair.cockburn@...
      >1814 E. Fort Douglas Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84103
      >Phone: 801.582-3162 Fax: 775.416.6457
      >
      >"La perfection est atteinte non quand il ne reste rien a ajouter,
      >mais quand il ne reste rien a enlever." (Saint-Exupery)
      >==============================================

      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Mike Jones
      ... What little I know about six sigma (I m just getting started myself), indicates that it will work in an Agile environment. Our product falls under FDA
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 2, 2003
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        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Brad Appleton <brad@b...>
        > I don't know who has applied this to software development,
        > but in theory at least "Lean" and Six Sigma are compotible,
        > so I would imagine it possible that Agile and Six Sigma are
        > compatible as well and it all comes down to the implementation
        > and execution in practice
        >

        What little I know about six sigma (I'm just getting started
        myself), indicates that it will work in an Agile environment.

        Our product falls under FDA control, and we wondered how we would
        implement Scrum and what the FDA needed. What we discovered was
        that the FDA didn't dictate any given process.

        What I'm finding is that these external processes have requirements
        and control points that you need to insert within your daily
        schedule (things you have to do to make the given process work - its
        a machine and you need to turn the crank).

        Scrum wasn't so much a process - it was a tool for getting processes
        done. Whatever your process is - you just insert them within your
        day.

        The FDA is pretty much about documenting everything- having defined
        processes and follow them (and "prove" that you followed them - if
        you don't write it down, it didn't happen). We just documented our
        implementation of Scrum (and how our life cycle worked). The FDA
        and Six Sigma have different purposes.

        I expect six sigma to be the same. A set of control points to
        insert into our current process and metrics to record (and feed into
        some machine). The hard part is always... Just Doing It. Agile is
        about doing whatever needs to be done and throwing the rest aside.
        So you decide what you want from the process and do those parts (and
        some parts aren't optional).

        -Mike
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