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Selling scrum and agile to the "others"?

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  • Alan Dayley
    ... Hash: SHA1 ( others = non-agile practicing colleges, management, customers, developers, etc.) I quote Ron Jeffries from another thread: It s not about
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 31, 2007
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      ("others" = non-agile practicing colleges, management, customers,
      developers, etc.)

      I quote Ron Jeffries from another thread: "It's not about hours. It's
      about enough." This statement represents the malleable nature of agile.
      Another thread is dealing with this nature when trying to "benchmark"
      agile use. This fuzzy nature is agile's strength. I agree completely.
      I also know that "others" also say things like "Do just enough." all
      the time. But as a new agile advocate I am rapidly finding that
      traditional expectations are a barrier to understanding.

      What methods or means are successful in getting others to "get it"? I
      expect it must be, again, a fuzzy thing where no one answer or way is
      correct. My current first attempts with most of my colleges are
      unsuccessful except to at least get the work "scrum" into the air.

      Alan

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    • Graeme Matthew
      Alan I by no means am saying that this is correct but it worked for me to get management buy-in to get scrum trialled. I printed a lot of articles on agility
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1, 2007
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        Alan I by no means am saying that this is correct but it worked for me
        to get management buy-in to get scrum trialled.

        I printed a lot of articles on agility from CIO Magazine and other
        sources. Every week I dropped off an article on the CIO's desk. He
        actually read them because they were short. Overtime something must have
        kicked in. I also got developers, architect and quality assurance
        managers thinking about it, slowly (7 months or more) people began
        talking amongst each other and it slowly spread.

        When we had a corporate function, drinks and agile chit chat can also go
        down well.

        When there were problems , for example, aagh no ! we need to update the
        func spec and get them to sign -off, oh and the traceability matrix with
        the BRS, I would comment and say I wish we could have used scrum blah
        blah blah, I think in the end they might have just said lets just do it
        we have nothing to lose as our current timeframe to deliver is not good.

        This led to them trialling it on a medium sized project. They saw much
        better results than they got from waterfall, but they did change a true
        scrum implementation to adapt it to their organisation, much to my
        disgust :-))

        I have actually found that so far in 3 companies that I have had more
        resistance , sceptics from people in information technology departments
        than anywhere else.

        The very people who should be bringing about this change to deliver
        value to the customer resist it.

        When I speak to our business customers and say how would you like it if
        we deliver you working software in 30 days, you get to change your mind
        because we know that you will, we realise that you dont really know all
        the detail at the start, but thats cool, and guess what we are not going
        to ask everything up front from you, you get to change your mind to
        ensure that you get what you want, the only thing in this partnership is
        you need to be available for us, you need to manage the ROI and we
        commit to doing our best possible work for you.

        I have not heard one of them refuse instead it has been , when do we
        start? The only hinderance so far has been I.T departments who do so
        much work yet never deliver very little besides sytems that adhere to
        complex, large and outdated documents.

        In the first company it was the developers who were the problem, and in
        the end the management that supported it left, they changed back to
        waterfall ......

        In my current "evangelism" it is IT once again who are hindering us, yet
        we are working around it, kicking goals, lots of things are starting to
        become visible :-))


        Cheers


        Graeme



        Alan Dayley wrote:
        >
        > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
        > Hash: SHA1
        >
        > ("others" = non-agile practicing colleges, management, customers,
        > developers, etc.)
        >
        > I quote Ron Jeffries from another thread: "It's not about hours. It's
        > about enough." This statement represents the malleable nature of agile.
        > Another thread is dealing with this nature when trying to "benchmark"
        > agile use. This fuzzy nature is agile's strength. I agree completely.
        > I also know that "others" also say things like "Do just enough." all
        > the time. But as a new agile advocate I am rapidly finding that
        > traditional expectations are a barrier to understanding.
        >
        > What methods or means are successful in getting others to "get it"? I
        > expect it must be, again, a fuzzy thing where no one answer or way is
        > correct. My current first attempts with most of my colleges are
        > unsuccessful except to at least get the work "scrum" into the air.
        >
        > Alan
        >
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        > <http://enigmail.mozdev.org>
        >
        > iD8DBQFFwXmcDQw/VSQuFZYRApX8AJoCok+qCP7bNgUsP6SsypM0MmuwhACfcBR/
        > CKmsvfzdhPsKFBlpPcF6gx8=
        > =yJaY
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        >
        >
      • Adrian Howard
        On 1 Feb 2007, at 05:24, Alan Dayley wrote: [snip] ... [snip] Generally I find showing rather than telling to be the most effective technique. If I think some
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1, 2007
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          On 1 Feb 2007, at 05:24, Alan Dayley wrote:
          [snip]
          > What methods or means are successful in getting others to "get it"? I
          > expect it must be, again, a fuzzy thing where no one answer or way is
          > correct. My current first attempts with most of my colleges are
          > unsuccessful except to at least get the work "scrum" into the air.
          [snip]

          Generally I find showing rather than telling to be the most effective
          technique. If I think some practice, say TDD, will help a client I'll
          just start writing tests. Once you have a demonstrable benefit it's
          easier to sell to others, which in turn then makes persuading folk
          that related techniques from the same stable could be a good idea too.

          Cheers,

          Adrian
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