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Comparing RUP and SCRUM

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  • yvonnecos
    Both RUP and SCRUM are software development methdologies. Both uses iterative and incremental development, starts with a vision document, and require JAD
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2007
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      Both RUP and SCRUM are software development methdologies. Both uses
      iterative and incremental development, starts with a vision document,
      and require JAD sessions. However SCRUM requires less documentation,
      more group meetings, more iterations (sprints)and uses release plans
      instead of project schedules. Given the bureaucracy that exist in
      Federal and State Government, what approach could be use to transition
      from RUP to SCRUM or should a version of SCRUM be adapted?
    • Andreas Schliep
      Hi, simple question, lots of possibilities... ... 1) Methodology I do not believe that there is a simple way to convince a bureaucratic organization -
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2007
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        Hi,

        simple question, lots of possibilities...

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "yvonnecos" <yvonnecos@...>
        wrote:
        > ... Given the bureaucracy that exist in
        > Federal and State Government, what approach could be use to transition
        > from RUP to SCRUM or should a version of SCRUM be adapted?
        >

        1) Methodology
        I do not believe that there is a simple way to convince a bureaucratic
        organization - government or German company ;-) - to pick any process
        or methodology without detailed documentation for every single step.
        Whether you decide to improve RUP towards Agile Unified Process or
        "simply" start with Scrum, you have to cope with a remaining
        organizational overhead. AUP might satisfy the organizational needs.
        Scrum is easier to implement but probably harder to defend.
        AUP: http://www.ambysoft.com/unifiedprocess/agileUP.html

        2) Transition
        The switch won't come in a day. We have learned that Scrum is a very
        good method to introduce Scrum in software development or evolve other
        organizational changes. Create a backlog of things you want to
        improve, prioritize them, set up iterations and go! One of the most
        crucial benefits of Scrum is its transparency. Any impediment that
        prevents your team, group or organization is clearly visible. You can
        point out the effects of any impediment and track the result of its
        removal.
        Impediment Backlog:
        http://www.sprint-it.de/sprint-it/scrum/artifacts/id=20,cid=29,lang=en

        3) Assistance
        We are here, of course. You can always adress the community or single
        members if you get stuck in your mission. And you will need more
        assistance - especially within your organization - to be succesful
        with agile approaches. Convince important stakeholders, work on quick
        yet sound results. Fear Less - consider the pattern work for
        organizational change by Mary Lynn Manns and Linda Rising.
        Patterns: http://www.cs.unca.edu/%7Emanns/intropatterns.html

        Believe in yourself and in your teams.
        Regards
        Andreas
      • Michael Vizdos
        For all those reading this thread, please remember the consequences of the last time we went down this particular rathole. Please do a search on this topic
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2007
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          For all those reading this thread, please remember the consequences of the last time we went down this particular rathole.  Please do a search on this topic and I'd highly suggest we stop this thread as it could be misconstrued as a possible religious rant.

          Trust me.

          - mike vizdos
            www.michaelvizdos.com/scrum
            www.implementingscrum.com

          On 1/2/07, yvonnecos <yvonnecos@...> wrote:

          Both RUP and SCRUM are software development methdologies. Both uses
          iterative and incremental development, starts with a vision document,
          and require JAD sessions. However SCRUM requires less documentation,
          more group meetings, more iterations (sprints)and uses release plans
          instead of project schedules. Given the bureaucracy that exist in
          Federal and State Government, what approach could be use to transition
          from RUP to SCRUM or should a version of SCRUM be adapted?


        • DoctorArtem
          ... AFAIK RUP does not really mandate having functional software and tested end-user features at the end of the every increment. RUP *can* be applied this way,
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 3, 2007
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            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "yvonnecos" <yvonnecos@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Both RUP and SCRUM are software development methdologies. Both uses
            > iterative and incremental development, starts with a vision document,
            > and require JAD sessions. However SCRUM requires less documentation,
            > more group meetings, more iterations (sprints)and uses release plans
            > instead of project schedules. Given the bureaucracy that exist in
            > Federal and State Government, what approach could be use to transition
            > from RUP to SCRUM or should a version of SCRUM be adapted?
            >

            AFAIK RUP does not really mandate having functional software and
            tested end-user features at the end of the every increment. RUP *can*
            be applied this way, but the existence of waterfall-like named phases
            often lead to the waterfall-like implementations.

            yvonnecos, RUP is not a process, but rather a process framework that
            could be used for creating very different processes - close to Scrum
            or very distant from Scrum. If I understood your question correctly
            you are considering the possibility of changing some particular RUP
            implementation into Scrum. Could you, then, describe in a bit more
            detail what your RUP implementation is like?

            --
            Artem Marchenko
            http://agilesoftwaredevelopment.com
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