Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

What we have learnt from 30+ years of waterfall

Expand Messages
  • Graeme Matthew
    I am putting this section in my project management guide and would like some comments on if I have missed anything or anyone does not agree with the statements
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 20, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I am putting this section in my project management guide and would like
      some comments on if I have missed anything or anyone does not agree with
      the statements below

      thanks


      What have we learnt from the last three decades of the waterfall
      methodology?

      Business is constantly changing and the waterfall methodology cannot
      adapt to this demand due to its prescriptive, sequential and static nature.

      Customers are expected to know all their requirements in detail upfront,
      fact is they dont, and can we really expect them too?

      Users that want product changes have to go through lengthy and expensive
      change control processes, in most cases its simply 'just to hard', in
      the end they get what was documented and not what is actually needed

      Business value is only delivered when implementation occurs, this can
      span many months or even years

      Waterfall forces us to spend a large amount of time documenting features
      of low or little business value, in most cases these features are
      probably never going to be used, but we have to get everything in or
      face a costly change control process

      Large detailed documents are open to mis-interpretation, people perceive
      statements differently

      Waterfall does not promote face to face collaboration, instead it
      promotes departmentalisation where documents are passed down the chain
      with the expectation that the approved document contains all the detail
      to begin the next phase

      We cannot estimate software accurately, we can only try and guess its
      actual cost, software is not like building a house, it is a creative and
      complex art and it is chaotic

      We find our mistakes when testing occurs, why then do we test at the
      end? A defect at the end is more costly to fix

      Large amounts of money is are wasted prior to realising failure, if we
      are going to fail we want to realise this early

      Waterfall has many time and money controls in place to make the process
      ordered and defined what is does not address is how to deliver value
      quickly to a customer
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.