Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scaling Scrum

Expand Messages
  • Mike Cohn
    I ve had more success with a single 10-person team than with two 4-5 person teams. Ten is the awkward number where it s either too big or too small. I work
    Message 1 of 80 , Oct 31, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I've had more success with a single 10-person team than with two 4-5 person teams. Ten is the awkward number where it's either too big or too small. I work with one team that has 13 people. None of us like it but they've looked at, the ScrumMaster has looked at it, and so have I. None of us has found an organization for that team that we think would be an improvement. Does that mean I want to go around advocating 13 as a common team size? No, but in this case it seems the best but we're constantly thinking in the backs of our minds about how to split them up.

      As you grow beyond 10 I suspect you'll find ways to split up but I wouldn't worry about them right now if 10 is working for you.

      Regards,
      Mike Cohn
      Author:
        Agile Estimating and Planning
        User Stories Applied
      www.mountaingoatsoftware.com


      On Oct 31, 2006, at 6:15 AM, Ragnar Birgisson wrote:

      Hi all,

      I'm looking for some advice on scaling Scrum. We have a team of 10
      people at the moment and it seems splitting them into 2 smaller teams
      would be a good thing. That's mostly based on what seems to be a common
      perception of an effective team size of 4-7 people.

      During our last retrospection I suggested that we tried this out the for
      current sprint. This sprint has now completed without any major problems
      and all stories where delivered. In this sprint we had two teams of 4
      people ( the other 2 people where on vacation ). The teams created their
      own sprint backlog from a common product backlog and selected one team
      member to act as a Scrum master for their team. This person was also
      partially working working on stories. We then had a scrum-of-scrums
      meeting to synchronize each day. Both teams share the same room. This is
      pretty much they way I have understood one goes about scaling Scrum.

      It would be nice to hear how other people address this. In particular
      for teams that share a common product backlog.


      After trying our the two team approach the following issues where raised
      at our sprint retrospection:

      (i) Teams are too small. They find it less comfortable and effective to
      work in a smaller team.

      (ii) There was some overlapping between the stories in the two teams.
      The teams had selected stories so that this would not happen, but still
      since the codebase is shared there where cases where things overlapped a
      bit. They found it more difficult to communicate about these things
      since they where in 2 teams.

      (iii) They did not see the logic in having two small teams working off
      the same product backlog.

      (iv) The previous approach of 10 people in a single team worked fine.
      Why change it now?

      So while the sprint went fine the team was not very happy. They would
      prefer to continue as one team of 10 people. In some ways this puzzles
      me a bit. I feels like their resentment towards using two smaller teams
      is more on an emotional level rather than a logical one. Something in
      this new setup is not making them comfortable and they where comfortable
      in the previous setup and things where going fine. I would like to
      continue with the two team approach since it's where we have to go in
      the long run. The single team approach might somehow work for us at the
      moment with 10 people but one day we will be 12, 14, 16, etc., and I
      can't see us working effectively as a single team of that size

      I wonder if anybody has had a similar experience?

      What are the advantages that people have experienced with a smaller team
      size?

      // Ragnar


    • kschwaber
      Jeff Sutherland and I are concerned. Many organizations are now trying to scale Scrum to larger projects and to entire organizational units, reaping the
      Message 80 of 80 , Oct 30, 2014
      • 0 Attachment

        Jeff Sutherland and I are concerned. Many organizations are now trying to scale Scrum to larger projects and to entire organizational units, reaping the benefits they have seen in smaller Scrum initiatives. 


        Unfortunately, there isn't a lot of guidance on how to do this. This has given rise to IBM's methodological response to DevOps, and to commercial one-size-fits all methodologies like SAFe and DAD. 


        To read more about how we intend to fill this need in a manner consonant with the Agile Manifesto and the principles of Scrum, I refer you to a blog I wrote at Scaling Scrum.

         

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.