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RE: [scrumdevelopment] OT - Books for Great Management and Leadership skills

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  • Steve Ropa
    I realize its kind of old school, but Peter Drucker is still the master. The Practice Of Management is considered to be his best work, but honestly you learn
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 4, 2006
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      I realize its kind of old school, but Peter Drucker is still the master.  The Practice Of Management is considered to be his best work, but honestly you learn from any of his books.

       

      Steve

       


      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Mark Levison
      Sent: Tuesday, October 03, 2006 6:39 PM
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ; win_tech_off_topic@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] OT - Books for Great Management and Leadership skills

       

      This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I respect the ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.

      In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team lead/management position with a team in our development
      organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will help me with the transition.

      Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
      1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what questions to ask in the first few weeks.
      2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it unit testing, scrum, etc.
      3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
      4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.

      My current list of books:
      Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic Programmers) -- gets universally good reviews.
      Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
      Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some argue that this book is getting a bit dated and stale.

      BTW I understand there is a difference between Management and Leader. While my title is likely to include the word Manager,
      the team will be small enough that I will be more of Team Lead/ScrumMaster. So I will need to provide leadership but have enough
      management skills to cover the management issues that come with the job (hiring etc.).

      Also please don't take the examples in #2 literally, I don't know if the team is using unit testing yet. Nor am I even certain the team
      will use Scrum. Obviously I will ask questions and try to understand what the team wants/needs.

      Thanks for the suggestions
      Mark Levison
      ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- ----
      Blog: http://www.notesfro matooluser. com/

    • Matt Truxaw
      A few of my favorites: The One Minute Manager by Ph.D. Kenneth Blanchard and M.D. Spencer Johnson A classic - overly simple but a must read especially for
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 4, 2006
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        A few of my favorites:

        The One Minute Manager
        by Ph.D. Kenneth Blanchard and M.D. Spencer Johnson
        A classic - overly simple but a must read especially for someone new
        to management

        First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do
        Differently by Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman
        Great research and new ideas on how to manage and lead people (but
        don't bother with their second book Now, Discover your strengths).

        Influence: Science and Practice by Robert B. Cialdini
        not a management book per se, but a great book on how to influence
        people and how you are influenced by others. Very readable, very
        interesting, I highly recommend this for everyone, manager or not.

        How to Become CEO: The Rules for Rising to the Top of Any
        Organization
        by Jeffrey J. Fox
        Simple, easy to read book with some good ideas

        Both Jim Collins' books "Good to Great" and "Built to Last" are
        excellent
        Very well researched, very interesting...more focused on companies
        than individual managers, but there is some great information in
        both these books.

        Zapp! The Lightning of Empowerment: How to Improve Productivity,
        Quality, and Employee Satisfaction
        by William Byham and Jeff Cox
        Another overly simplified silly book that has some great thoughts


        Fish! A Remarkable Way to Boost Morale and Improve Results by
        Stephen C. Lundin, Harry Paul, and John Christensen
        Another overly simplified book that has some great thoughts, more
        customer service oriented, but has some good ideas for anyone


        The Fiefdom Syndrome: The Turf Battles That Undermine Careers and
        Companies - And How to Overcome Them
        by Robert Herbold
        Another great book that I just realized I need to re-read since I
        can't come up with any good comments about it, but I do remember it
        was a great book.




        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison"
        <mlevison@...> wrote:
        >
        > This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I
        respect the
        > ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.
        >
        > In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team
        lead/management
        > position with a team in our development
        > organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will
        help me with
        > the transition.
        >
        > Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
        > 1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what
        questions to
        > ask in the first few weeks.
        > 2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it
        unit
        > testing, scrum, etc.
        > 3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
        > 4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.
        >
        > My current list of books:
        > Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic
        Programmers) --
        > gets universally good reviews.
        > Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
        > Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some
        argue that
        > this book is getting a bit dated and stale.
        >
        > BTW I understand there is a difference between Management and
        Leader. While
        > my title is likely to include the word Manager,
        > the team will be small enough that I will be more of Team
        Lead/ScrumMaster.
        > So I will need to provide leadership but have enough
        > management skills to cover the management issues that come with
        the job
        > (hiring etc.).
        >
        > Also please don't take the examples in #2 literally, I don't know
        if the
        > team is using unit testing yet. Nor am I even certain the team
        > will use Scrum. Obviously I will ask questions and try to
        understand what
        > the team wants/needs.
        >
        > Thanks for the suggestions
        > Mark Levison
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        ---
        > Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
        >
      • DianaLarsen
        Hi Mark, It a bit on the academic side, but I think one of the most important and exciting books on leadership is Shsred Leadership: Reframing the Hows and
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 4, 2006
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          Hi Mark,

          It'a bit on the academic side, but I think one of the most important
          and exciting books on leadership is "Shsred Leadership: Reframing the
          Hows and Whys of Leadership" edited by Craig Pearce and Jay Conger.
          The chapters contrast "Shared" and "Vertical" leadership models. They
          move our thinking from the idea of a single, individual, capital L,
          Leader to the "law of the situation"(Mary Parker Follett, 1924) idea
          that individuals and teams should follow the lead of the person with
          the most knowledge regarding the situation at hand, rather than the
          person with a formal title and authority. Of course the person with
          the most knowledge changes from situation to situation, and could be
          anyone on the team. I could go on...but I won't.

          Shared Leadership offers important new ideas for groups that get the
          work done in teams, and for managers who work with them.

          Diana

          Diana Larsen
          co-author, _Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great_ (Pragmatic
          Bookshelf, 2006)
          www.futureworksconsulting.com
          503-288-3550

          Upcoming: "Secrets of Agile Teamwork: Beyond Technical Skills" public
          workshop, Dec. 5-7, 2006. Contact me for more information.

          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison" <mlevison@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I respect the
          > ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.
          >
          > In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team
          lead/management
          > position with a team in our development
          > organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will help
          me with
          > the transition.
          >
          > Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
          > 1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what
          questions to
          > ask in the first few weeks.
          > 2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it unit
          > testing, scrum, etc.
          > 3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
          > 4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.
          >
          > My current list of books:
          > Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic
          Programmers) --
          > gets universally good reviews.
          > Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
          > Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some argue that
          > this book is getting a bit dated and stale.
          >
          > BTW I understand there is a difference between Management and
          Leader. While
          > my title is likely to include the word Manager,
          > the team will be small enough that I will be more of Team
          Lead/ScrumMaster.
          > So I will need to provide leadership but have enough
          > management skills to cover the management issues that come with the job
          > (hiring etc.).
          >
          > Also please don't take the examples in #2 literally, I don't know if the
          > team is using unit testing yet. Nor am I even certain the team
          > will use Scrum. Obviously I will ask questions and try to understand
          what
          > the team wants/needs.
          >
          > Thanks for the suggestions
          > Mark Levison
          > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
          > Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
          >
        • Aaron Korver
          Hi Mark, As for #2 check out Fearless Change by Mary Lynn Manns and Linda Rising
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 4, 2006
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            Hi Mark,
            As for #2 check out Fearless Change by Mary Lynn Manns and Linda Rising

            http://www.amazon.com/o/ASIN/0201741571/ref=s9_asin_title_1/002-7625161-9229640


            On 10/3/06, Mark Levison <mlevison@...> wrote:

            This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I respect the ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.

            In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team lead/management position with a team in our development
            organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will help me with the transition.

            Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
            1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what questions to ask in the first few weeks.
            2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it unit testing, scrum, etc.
            3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
            4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.

            My current list of books:
            Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic Programmers) -- gets universally good reviews.
            Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
            Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some argue that this book is getting a bit dated and stale.

            BTW I understand there is a difference between Management and Leader. While my title is likely to include the word Manager,
            the team will be small enough that I will be more of Team Lead/ScrumMaster. So I will need to provide leadership but have enough
            management skills to cover the management issues that come with the job (hiring etc.).

            Also please don't take the examples in #2 literally, I don't know if the team is using unit testing yet. Nor am I even certain the team
            will use Scrum. Obviously I will ask questions and try to understand what the team wants/needs.

            Thanks for the suggestions
            Mark Levison
            ----------------------------------------------------------------------
            Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/


          • Greg R. Broderick
            ... [snip] IMHO, Peopleware is just as applicable and valuable today as it was when it was written. Four other books that you might find useful: - Slack by
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 4, 2006
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              On 3 Oct 2006 at 20:38, Mark Levison wrote:

              > This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I respect the
              > ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.
              >
              > In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team lead/management
              > position with a team in our development
              > organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will help me with
              > the transition.
              >
              > Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
              > 1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what questions to
              > ask in the first few weeks.
              > 2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it unit
              > testing, scrum, etc.
              > 3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
              > 4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.
              >
              > My current list of books:
              > Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic Programmers) --
              > gets universally good reviews.
              > Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
              > Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some argue that
              > this book is getting a bit dated and stale.

              [snip]

              IMHO, Peopleware is just as applicable and valuable today as it was
              when it was written.

              Four other books that you might find useful:

              - "Slack" by Tom DeMarco

              - "Further Up the Organization" by Robert Townshend

              Out of print, but you can still track down a used copy easily
              enough.

              - "Becoming a Technical Leader" by Gerald Weinberg

              - "The Mythical Man Month" by Fred Brooks


              Cheers
              GRB


              --
              Greg R. Broderick


              There are 10 types of people in the world... those who
              understand binary and those who don't

              -----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
              Version: 3.1
              GCS d>+ s:- a+ C+++$ ULHS++$ !P+(--)>+++ L++$ E--- W++(+)
              N++(+++) o+ K++++++(----) w++(---) !O M-(--) V(--)
              PS+++(++) PE-() Y+ PGP++ t(--) 5 X--(-) R tv--(+)@ b++
              DI++(+++) D--- G+ e++ h(+) r- z++**()
              ------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------
            • Esther Derby
              Hi, Mark -- I think your first choice is a good one ;-) I d add another book to your (now very long) reading list. Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths and Total
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 5, 2006
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                Hi, Mark --

                I think your first choice is a good one ;-)

                I'd add another book to your (now very long) reading list. Hard Facts,
                Dangerous Half-Truths and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based
                Management by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Bob Sutton.


                I like this book for a number of reasons. The top 2 are that it walks
                through the assumptions that underlie widely applied management practices,
                and shows where "what we know that ain't so." Second, it focuses on managing
                based on evidence, which seems sort of agile to me... inspect and then
                adapt.

                BTW, if you want to bounce around ideas or have questions about your new
                role, feel free to shoot me an email off list.

                ED

                Esther Derby
                Esther Derby Associates, Inc.
                612-724-8114 www.estherderby.com

                Now available: Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great, by Esther
                Derby and Diana Larsen (Pragmatic Bookshelf, 2006)

                Secrets of Agile Teamwork PUBLIC workshop December 5-7. Email me for more
                information.

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DianaLarsen
                > Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2006 3:28 PM
                > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: OT - Books for Great Management and
                > Leadership skills
                >
                > Hi Mark,
                >
                > It'a bit on the academic side, but I think one of the most important
                > and exciting books on leadership is "Shsred Leadership: Reframing the
                > Hows and Whys of Leadership" edited by Craig Pearce and Jay Conger.
                > The chapters contrast "Shared" and "Vertical" leadership models. They
                > move our thinking from the idea of a single, individual, capital L,
                > Leader to the "law of the situation"(Mary Parker Follett, 1924) idea
                > that individuals and teams should follow the lead of the person with
                > the most knowledge regarding the situation at hand, rather than the
                > person with a formal title and authority. Of course the person with
                > the most knowledge changes from situation to situation, and could be
                > anyone on the team. I could go on...but I won't.
                >
                > Shared Leadership offers important new ideas for groups that get the
                > work done in teams, and for managers who work with them.
                >
                > Diana
                >
                > Diana Larsen
                > co-author, _Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great_ (Pragmatic
                > Bookshelf, 2006)
                > www.futureworksconsulting.com
                > 503-288-3550
                >
                > Upcoming: "Secrets of Agile Teamwork: Beyond Technical Skills" public
                > workshop, Dec. 5-7, 2006. Contact me for more information.
                >
                > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison" <mlevison@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I respect the
                > > ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.
                > >
                > > In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team
                > lead/management
                > > position with a team in our development
                > > organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will help
                > me with
                > > the transition.
                > >
                > > Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
                > > 1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what
                > questions to
                > > ask in the first few weeks.
                > > 2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it unit
                > > testing, scrum, etc.
                > > 3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
                > > 4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.
                > >
                > > My current list of books:
                > > Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic
                > Programmers) --
                > > gets universally good reviews.
                > > Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
                > > Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some argue that
                > > this book is getting a bit dated and stale.
                > >
                > > BTW I understand there is a difference between Management and
                > Leader. While
                > > my title is likely to include the word Manager,
                > > the team will be small enough that I will be more of Team
                > Lead/ScrumMaster.
                > > So I will need to provide leadership but have enough
                > > management skills to cover the management issues that come with the job
                > > (hiring etc.).
                > >
                > > Also please don't take the examples in #2 literally, I don't know if the
                > > team is using unit testing yet. Nor am I even certain the team
                > > will use Scrum. Obviously I will ask questions and try to understand
                > what
                > > the team wants/needs.
                > >
                > > Thanks for the suggestions
                > > Mark Levison
                > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                > > Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
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                >
                >
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                >
                >
                >
                >
              • wilsonzhang2000
                Mark, If you only have time for one good book on leadership, you should really read Fusion Leadership: http://www.amazon.com/Fusion-
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 5, 2006
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                  Mark,

                  If you only have time for one good book on leadership, you should
                  really read Fusion Leadership: http://www.amazon.com/Fusion-
                  Leadership-Unlocking-Forces-Organizations/dp/157675023X/sr=1-
                  1/qid=1160065541/ref=sr_1_1/104-7893658-1317550?ie=UTF8&s=books.

                  All the other books on leadership are optional, unless you are in a
                  MBA program, IMHO.

                  Wilson



                  --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison"
                  <mlevison@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > This is an off topic post, I'm asking question here since I respect
                  the
                  > ideas and opinions of the others on this forum.
                  >
                  > In the next few weeks/month I will be starting a new team
                  lead/management
                  > position with a team in our development
                  > organisation. I'm looking for a couple of good books that will help
                  me with
                  > the transition.
                  >
                  > Currently here are the key areas that I will need to address
                  > 1) Listen, Listen, Listen - I need some good hints as to what
                  questions to
                  > ask in the first few weeks.
                  > 2) I'm looking for innovative ways to introduce new ideas. Be it
                  unit
                  > testing, scrum, etc.
                  > 3) Ways to kick start brown bag lunch or similiar sessions.
                  > 4) The many management skills that I don't even know I'm missing.
                  >
                  > My current list of books:
                  > Behind Closed Doors: Secrets of Great Management (Pragmatic
                  Programmers) --
                  > gets universally good reviews.
                  > Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
                  > Peopleware: Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister -- I've heard some argue
                  that
                  > this book is getting a bit dated and stale.
                  >
                  > BTW I understand there is a difference between Management and
                  Leader. While
                  > my title is likely to include the word Manager,
                  > the team will be small enough that I will be more of Team
                  Lead/ScrumMaster.
                  > So I will need to provide leadership but have enough
                  > management skills to cover the management issues that come with the
                  job
                  > (hiring etc.).
                  >
                  > Also please don't take the examples in #2 literally, I don't know
                  if the
                  > team is using unit testing yet. Nor am I even certain the team
                  > will use Scrum. Obviously I will ask questions and try to
                  understand what
                  > the team wants/needs.
                  >
                  > Thanks for the suggestions
                  > Mark Levison
                  > --------------------------------------------------------------------
                  --
                  > Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/
                  >
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