Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [scrumdevelopment] Beyond Dashboards and crayolas new thread

Expand Messages
  • Richard Lacher
    Rick Mike Dwyer wrote: Michael F. Dwyer Planning constantly peers into the future for indications as to where a solution may
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 29, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Rick

      Mike Dwyer <mike.dwyer1@...> wrote:
       
       
      Michael F. Dwyer
       
      "Planning constantly peers into the future for indications as to where a solution may emerge."
      "A Plan is a complex situation, adapting to an emerging solution." 
      -----Original Message-----
      From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:scrumdevelo pment@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Richard Lacher
      Sent:
      Friday, September 29, 2006 5:48 PM
      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Beyond Dashboards and crayolas new thread
       
      OK, but I was kinda interested in where you were headed ....

      As you said the Six Sigma guys do like SCRUM and AGILE but I don't see these two camps in competition.  Instead I see xp/scrum/agile as a toolbox full of techniques and tools that can solve the bigger problem that 'Lean' Six Sigma is trying to solve.
      [MFD] When you look at the daily scrum meeting it has the same properties as a change of shift meeting that was the core of the manufacturing world Six Sigma came from.  Black Belts from the auto industry picked up on this immediately and made note that much of what they are trying to do with their high strategy high ceremony acronyms is to get knowledge workers to think and communicate what the heck is really going on.  So one of them looks at me and says quite openly, “you get all this done with no wasted time”  He then became more distant as my work made his look like too much payout for the same return.

      As for Agile on a diet, it's not so much about leaning out AGILE as it is about leaning out how a shop implements it.
      [MFD] That was a joke and I suspect that Mary P. will get me for it.  (^8
      Yep, LOL on that one too.

       
      Lean Six Sigma for Service tells you to know your customer and their [sorry, no foul sb--] Critical To Quality (CTQs) requirements, then know your process.  All processes have inefficiencies. In fact a cognitive process like product development is considered world class if it's PCE (process cycle efficiency) is just 25%!  
      [MFD] WOW that must be a BFD IMO else it is a FMEA dipped in SIPOD.  Sorry, I get that way around character strings insufficiently voweled.  Flash backs of JCL and DOS, as well as command lining ED and tweaking CICS make me do things like that. 

      So after we brought in some great AGILE enablers and coaches, we studied our new AGILE process and found numerous opportunities to remove waste and speed up our delivery in how we had implemented.

      You pointed out one key area in you initial comment -- Project management.  The PMO and PMs are clearly customers and they have many expectations.  And since they don't seem to be going away, we had to decide how much time out of each iteration must be alotted to meeting their needs. 

      A particularly agregious example was the PM's mandated they must arrange all meetings between Prd Dev and the outside world, and if the PM could not attend then the meeting would need to be postponed! These expectations needed to be reset to a simplier less wasteful process. This negotiation worked well with some PM's and others actively resisted.  

      To your thread on PMO's pretty little colored dots and AGILE projects never going RED. Our experience is that our PMs can now be more decisive because we give them facts based on hard data.  The scrummaster now reports every iteration (for us 1 or 2 wk long) a forecast that is based on team velocity and remaining backlog.  He also reports remaining iterations to code complete. Done. A simple, accurate objective assessment.  PMs were instructed to stopped trying to track Prd Dev tasks and focus at the iteration level.  They could look at the iteration plan and determine what stories are complete, which remain, and which iteration are they projected to be code complete.
      [MFD] That is about why Agile efforts rarely go RED.  The other reason is that we kill them when the dead fish smell scent appears.  I agree  that the term’ projected’ has less and less meaning and the even the notion of measuring anything that is not done is a MUDA candidate.  Things are either done or are candidates for waste.  This also makes the notion of RED obsolete.  If you want to really crank up the action move to a “C” level Scrum and watch the TPS (Toyota Production System) capabilities kick in.


      BTW, the PMO and PM's were not in our top 5 list of root cause inefficiencies.
      [MFD] PMO’s and PM’s are not, in themselves root causes of MUDA, it is this notion that complex issues can be managed with three colors that is root.  Today’s PMO, PM world is an enabler of this, and as such shares in the co-dependency that arises from it.



      Mike Dwyer <mike.dwyer1@ comcast.net> wrote:
      Tell us more about Agile on a diet.
       
      NOTE TO ALL  I HAVE COPIED OUT THE START OF THIS THREAD
      -----Original Message-----
      From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:scrumdevelo pment@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of Richard Lacher
      Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 10:01 AM
      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: Beyond Dashboards and crayolas was ----->RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Career paths for ScrumMasters
      Hummmm, now this is getting interesting.

      I too have taken the less traveled path and embarked on an effort that leaned out our Agile practice.  Using "Lean" Six Sigma to gain focus and remove waste our prod. dev. team doubled velocity and throughput. 
      Rick
       

      Mike Dwyer <mike.dwyer1@ comcast.net> wrote:
      Recently a good friend of mine pulled me in his office.  Since he s bigger than me, and a former member of SEAL TEAM 3 and DELTA, I decided it would be a good idea to let him. 8^)
       
      “WHY” he asked,  “Do you want to sit around and color in little squares the rest of your life?”  After a few minutes of this I got the distinct impression this Senior Vice President and CTO viewed Project Managers as little more than Administrators with crayolas.  Where we work, this is a fair cop, as the PMO and the PM shops have become dashboard fanatics because that is all ‘management” wants to see – and then focus on the RED.  The problem was Agile was loosing visibility after all when you colored in the Agile Dashboards you never used RED – until someone went off the reservation. 
       
      That happened while I was away on a ‘secret mission’ that effectively wasted my summer flying between the two coasts.  But during that time, I had an opportunity to review what was going on and decide where to take what I do. 
       
      So for the past six months I have been redefining what Scrum is here and moving it away from the crayola mindset to the process mindset.  Now I find that the Six Sigma, Balanced ScoreCard, and TPS folks look at what we in Scrum do and immediately recognize that it is a valuable, if not competitive, approach to their work.
       
       
      One of the bigger influences in this shift is the work that Jeff Sutherland, Hubert Smits, and Jean Tabaka are doing on Program Management. This work, along with Michele Sliger’s articles on the commonality/ difference between traditional and agile work.   Hubert, Jean, and Michele are all with Rally Software.
       
      From another direction, Rob Austin’s work “Artful Making”, Ralph Stacy’s “Strategic Management and Organisational Dynamics” and Johanna Rothman and Esther Derby work “Behind Closed Doors”.
       
      More on this later.
       
      Michael F. Dwyer
       
      "Planning constantly peers into the future for indications as to where a solution may emerge."
      "A Plan is a complex situation, adapting to an emerging solution." 
       
       
      Michael F. Dwyer
       
      "Planning constantly peers into the future for indications as to where a solution may emerge."
      "A Plan is a complex situation, adapting to an emerging solution." 
       
       
       

      Do you Yahoo!?
      Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.

      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.