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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Footnote from India - Ganesha, an Agile Diety

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  • Steve Ropa
    Hi Gabby, I work with a *lot* of Indians, and I shared this with them and they were delighted. Not as a religious thing as much as an easy way to overcome some
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 29, 2006
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      Hi Gabby,

      I work with a *lot* of Indians, and I shared this with them and they were delighted.  Not as a religious thing as much as an easy way to overcome some of the difficulties in understanding a complex topic like Agility.  By having a frame of reference a little closer to home, it made all these weird concepts a little more familiar.

      Steve

      gabby_robertson wrote:

      Hi

      I'm actually a New Zealander who lives in the US and I'm just visiting
      India. Yes Gabby Robertson (now Benefield) is about as Scottish as
      you can get. Just sharing the international love here, I'm Agnostic
      so no religious intent in my posting. Peace brother:)

      --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, "Steven Gordon"
      <sgordonphd@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > Gabby,
      >
      > If you understood and appreciated the western culture the way you want
      > me to understand and appreciate your culture, you would know that
      > throwing a pointer to a religious icon on a mailing list would seem to
      > be evangelizing a religous belief. In my culture it would be equally
      > inappropriate if it was about the agility of Jesus (which has been
      > posted a few times to much disdain).
      >
      > A culturally-educatio nal, non-religious explanation (like yours below)
      > of how it
      > /specifically/ relates to Scrum shows much more thought and
      > consideration of the potential pitfalls of the topic. I would not
      > have found that inappropriate (well, at least no more inappropriate
      > than the Pigs and Chickens concept in Scrum that really should be
      > replaced by some more culturally-neutral analogy).
      >
      > Sincerely,
      >


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