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The Survey was Re: Agile 2.0

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  • gioramorein
    ... Let me start by saying that I DO NOT support any rebranding of Agile, its goals, values or principles for the sake of purposeless marketing just as much as
    Message 1 of 41 , Aug 1, 2006
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      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries
      <ronjeffries@...> wrote:


      > That's fine, except that few organizations have as yet mastered
      > "Agile 1.0". I can see why, from a /marketing/ viewpoint, one would
      > want to use the term. Perhaps you can see why, from the viewpoint of
      > people who actually know and care about Agile being /done/, we might
      > decry such a usage.

      Let me start by saying that I DO NOT support any rebranding of Agile,
      its goals, values or principles for the sake of purposeless marketing
      just as much as I deplore anyone creating his or her own "flavor" of
      agile in the hopes of self-promotion and self edification -- or
      possibly to sell a few books. At the same time there is an undertone
      in some of these posts that there is no room for new thinking or new
      ideas for Agile. That somehow there is no room for improvement. I
      find this notion contradictory to our Agile principles. I also reject
      the idea that somehow the original manifesto signatories have a
      monopoly on Agile thought leadership. Some of the best ideas I have
      heard on the subject come from people you've never heard of.

      I do however wish to propose that perhaps this heinous "Agile 2.0"
      that we all hiss at does not in fact refer to a new process,
      methodology or set of practices. Perhaps when someone refers to
      "Agile 2.0 " or the "Next Generation of Agile" they are referring
      instead to the latest wave of Agile adoption. Agile is clearly
      becoming increasingly mainstream. The trend has gone from a somewhat
      linear adoption to what is arguably an exponential (or is it
      logarithmic?) penetration. If you seek proof, look at the trend of
      CSM's over the past 3 years. I actually did this using the lists of
      registered CSM's and registration dates and could clearly depict the
      increasing rate of certifications. Perhaps this new surge in
      popularity is this second generation of Agile.

      There is further clear evidence that this recent growth in Agile
      adoption is driven by larger enterprises. Though Agile popularity
      within the ISV's is still there, this latest push in the market it
      mostly driven by large enterprises. Forrester research published an
      interesting report about Agile adoption in November 2005 ("Corporate
      IT Leads The Second Wave Of Agile Adoption"). Based on their
      research, at the time the report was published, Agile adoption within
      large enterprises was 14% - about 1 in 7. They predict that by the
      end of this year, that number will be closer to 1 in 3. Now I grant
      you that these numbers don't represent the total volume of Agile
      projects within larger enterprises compared to waterfall, but it is a
      clear indication that these types of companies are the ones driving
      Agile popularity and adoption today.

      So maybe when we hear these offensive terms like "New Agile",
      "Enterprise Agile" or "Agile 2.0" we consider that they may not refer
      to a change in Agile itself, but rather a change in who and where it
      is being used.

      Giora Morein
      gmorein@...
    • Mike Beedle
      ... Giora, Good points.... but, there is also a valid point in highlighting that the basic Agile single-project techniques DO NOT satisfy the requirements of
      Message 41 of 41 , Aug 10, 2006
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        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "gioramorein" <gmorein@...>
        wrote:

        > So maybe when we hear these offensive terms like "New Agile",
        > "Enterprise Agile" or "Agile 2.0" we consider that they may not refer
        > to a change in Agile itself, but rather a change in who and where it
        > is being used.
        >
        > Giora Morein
        > gmorein@...


        Giora,

        Good points.... but, there is also a valid point in highlighting
        that the basic Agile single-project techniques DO NOT satisfy
        the requirements of enterprise development, and that there are
        also "advanced agile techniques", not necessarily included in
        Scrum (Agile == Scrum 1.0, XP == cheap copy of Scrum without credit,
        other methods sorry but NOT Agile enough). [NOTE to Ron: Please
        send your standard insults in direct messages to me, and don't waste
        the group's bandwith.]

        For example, from the enteprise perspective, 1) Super-sprints
        that include simultanous testing and release of multiple applications
        with reusable functionality across different projects (each with their
        own Scrum), and from the "advanced agile techniques" side
        2) structured "green hat" sessions, to compare alternative designs
        in a single project; are good exmaples of these enterprise
        or advanced agile techniques. Other examples are the late
        contributions from Jeff Sutherland, and the many unexploited
        managment and social techniques derived from agent technologies.

        But all this is well known among Scrum practitioners:

        We are not done with Agile...
        We need more for the enterprise, and
        We can improve even the single project techniques

        However, what the skeptics and anti-brandists confuse, is the fact
        that some of us, that for lack of better words I am going to call
        the "enterprise or advance agile developers", have found over time
        some techniques that apply to managing multiple project
        simultaneously, or more techniques to manage individual projects.

        But for those contributions we get the privilege to be
        insulted as "brandists", "opportunists", or worse.

        We need to "open our minds" and continue to let innovation take
        place. We need to stop the overzealous restrain of creativity
        and open ourselves to NEW and IMPROVED ideas (yes, while giving
        FULL credit to everthing done in the past!!!)

        Until then, we will continue to dwell in mediocrity, bashing
        and restraining people accusing them of things like:

        * it has been done before -- let us find NEW and OLD patterns!
        * you are branding! (who cares if they brand! Let them try
        new things and follow the course of adaptation)

        Change is the only constant... Agile 1.0, or 2.0 or 3.0,
        cannot be constant, or cannot be just "one way"...
        we thrive in diversity, in cooperation but also in competition.

        End of rant,

        - Mike
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