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RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Targets, incentives and rewards with SCRUM.

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  • Ilja Preuss
    ... I think a good attractor for an Agile team probably should be along the lines of make the customer happy . Setting such a target certainly is a good
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 3 6:56 AM
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      > A well placed "target" could be an attractor, but for that to work the
      > team has to accept the attractor.

      I think a good attractor for an Agile team probably should be along the
      lines of "make the customer happy".

      Setting such a target certainly is a good thing. The more concrete the
      target becomes, the more it hinders self-organization, and the more it has
      the potential for dysfunction. In fact I think even trying to make customer
      happiness measurable has this potential.

      And putting an incentive on the target multiplies the potential for
      dysfunction.

      Cheers, Ilja
    • Mark Levison
      For a different perspective on this discuss see Darin Cummins paper The Developement Game [1]. Darin used a competition within the cooperative process to
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 4 11:51 AM
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        For a different perspective on this discuss see Darin Cummins paper "The Developement Game" [1]. Darin used a competition within the cooperative process to help people get into new habits. After a couple of iterations he removed the framework. So in my perception the game was a useful way to instill new habits into a group that had been struggling with the transition.

        Mark Levison
      • Pete Deemer
        for those interested in reading this paper, it s at http://www.agiledevelopmentconference.com/files/XR4-2.pdf I d be interested in what others think, but this
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 4 7:33 PM
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          for those interested in reading this paper, it's at
          http://www.agiledevelopmentconference.com/files/XR4-2.pdf

          I'd be interested in what others think, but this approach really
          doesn't sit right with me. It seems to me like a complex framework of
          individual incentives would inadvertantly cultivate "I" thinking to
          the detriment of "we" (team) thinking (the latter being imo one of the
          "quiet accelerators" in scrum); it would invite optimization at the
          micro level that is suboptimal at the macro level; and it would
          generate a lot of ceremony and mental activity around things other
          than the the doing of the work in service of the customer. I guess in
          the situation described, I'd be more inclined to work with the team to
          squarely explore what's undermining its motivation, versus creating a
          game to somehow compensate or distract from those things.

          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison" <mlevison@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > For a different perspective on this discuss see Darin Cummins paper "The
          > Developement Game" [1]. Darin used a competition within the cooperative
          > process to help people get into new habits. After a couple of
          iterations he
          > removed the framework. So in my perception the game was a useful way to
          > instill new habits into a group that had been struggling with the
          > transition.
          >
          > Mark Levison
          >
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