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Targets, incentives and rewards with SCRUM.

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  • Renji Panicker
    Hi everyone, When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team if you
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 29, 2006
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      Hi everyone,

       

      When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team “if you achieve <X> target in this sprint, you all get a lollipop”, what would that <X> be? I imagine it would be the sprint goals we set at the beginning, but if anyone has any other suggestions, I’d love to hear it.

       

      Thanks,

      -/renji

       

       

    • Scott Zibble
      As a SCRUM team member myself, I can tell you, I ve always wanted a pony...
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 29, 2006
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        As a SCRUM team member myself, I can tell you, I've always wanted a pony...

        On 6/29/06, Renji Panicker <Renji.P@...> wrote:

        Hi everyone,

         

        When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team "if you achieve <X> target in this sprint, you all get a lollipop", what would that <X> be? I imagine it would be the sprint goals we set at the beginning, but if anyone has any other suggestions, I'd love to hear it.

         

        Thanks,

        -/renji

         

         


      • Ron Jeffries
        ... Why do you feel the need to offer incentives? Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com It s easy to have a complicated idea. It s very very hard to have a simple
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 29, 2006
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          On Thursday, June 29, 2006, at 7:49:21 PM, Renji Panicker wrote:

          > When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer
          > performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team "if you
          > achieve <X> target in this sprint, you all get a lollipop", what would
          > that <X> be? I imagine it would be the sprint goals we set at the
          > beginning, but if anyone has any other suggestions, I'd love to hear it.

          Why do you feel the need to offer incentives?

          Ron Jeffries
          www.XProgramming.com
          It's easy to have a complicated idea. It's very very hard to have a simple idea.
          -- Carver Mead
        • Pete Deemer
          By associating an incentive with a particular goal, the risk is that you are subtly (but nonetheless effectively) reverting back into the
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 29, 2006
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            By associating an incentive with a particular goal, the risk is that
            you are subtly (but nonetheless effectively) reverting back into the
            product-owner-assigning-work-to-the-team mode, and you're setting up a
            game of asking the team to commit to more than it thinks it should.

            So what is the effect you're seeking to bring about with the
            incentive? Does it just boil down to trying to cajole people into
            working longer hours than they would otherwise?

            To put it another way, are you just in a very roundabout way proposing
            to the team that their workday go from 10am-6pm to 10am-8pm instead?
            If that's what you really want, don't play games, propose it to the
            team, and see what they want in return. (I say this as an advocate of
            openness and visibility, not as an advocate of running a team at
            redline, which is in most cases going to hurt a whole lot more than it
            helps).

            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Renji Panicker"
            <Renji.P@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi everyone,
            >
            >
            >
            > When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer
            > performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team "if you
            > achieve <X> target in this sprint, you all get a lollipop", what would
            > that <X> be? I imagine it would be the sprint goals we set at the
            > beginning, but if anyone has any other suggestions, I'd love to hear it.
            >
            >
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > -/renji
            >
          • scrum@contrado.com.au
            There are already incentives set if you achieve the sprint goal for example: A valuable team member Comraderie (Espirit De Corps) Fun Part of a successfull
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 29, 2006
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              There are already incentives set if you achieve the sprint goal for example:

              A valuable team member
              Comraderie (Espirit De Corps)
              Fun
              Part of a successfull team
              Personal Learning / Improvement
              Respect from other workers and management

              For me these are bigger enough incentives. If you say to me you get 3000
              dollars if you hit the sprint goal, I may be encouraged to work longer
              hours, take short cuts or for the sake of personal gain rather team /
              company gain. I dont think this is a good idea.

              There are other social things that can be done for example celebrating
              the end of a successfull sprint on a Friday night or a team lunch.

              The reward in most companies will be your year end review, successfull
              product development should lead to increased profits and in most
              companies your annual salary increase should be good or they may offer a
              bonus. Financial reward should always be aligned to company performance.

              Regards

              Graeme






              >
              > Hi everyone,
              >
              >
              >
              > When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer
              > performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team "if you
              > achieve <X> target in this sprint, you all get a lollipop", what would
              > that <X> be? I imagine it would be the sprint goals we set at the
              > beginning, but if anyone has any other suggestions, I'd love to hear it.
              >
              >
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > -/renji
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

              --
            • Michael Vizdos
              Hi, In addition to the comments above (or below depending on how you read this!), I d say if this is something the TEAM wants.... the Scrum Master should talk
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 30, 2006
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                Hi,

                In addition to the comments above (or below depending on how you read this!), I'd say if this is something the TEAM wants.... the Scrum Master should talk to the TEAM about this.  I'd make sure you understand the implications of what you are trying to do with what has already been stated.

                Thank you,

                - mike vizdos
                  www.michaelvizdos.com/scrum


                On 6/29/06, Renji Panicker <Renji.P@...> wrote:

                Hi everyone,

                 

                When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer performance incentives to the team? If I want to tell my team "if you achieve <X> target in this sprint, you all get a lollipop", what would that <X> be? I imagine it would be the sprint goals we set at the beginning, but if anyone has any other suggestions, I'd love to hear it.

                 

                Thanks,

                -/renji

                 

                 


              • David H.
                ... I agree as well. Just because you think it is a good idea does not make it a motivator for the team all of a sudden. Human perception is something that is
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 30, 2006
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                  > In addition to the comments above (or below depending on how you read this!), I'd say if this is something the TEAM wants.... the Scrum Master should talk to the TEAM about this. I'd make sure you understand the implications of what you are trying to do with what has already been stated.
                  >
                  I agree as well. Just because you think it is a good idea does not
                  make it a motivator for the team all of a sudden. Human perception is
                  something that is very much driven by a factor of common need and
                  understanding. If you introduce such a scheme without the team having
                  a need for it, because they naturally want to do their best, you will
                  most likely see the opposit of the effect you are trying to achieve.

                  -d


                  --
                  Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
                  Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail accounts.
                • Ilja Preuss
                  ... Another thing to keep in mind is that extrinsic motivation typically is in violent conflict with intrinsic motivation. That is, if your team already is
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 30, 2006
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                    > Just because you think it is a good idea does not
                    > make it a motivator for the team all of a sudden.

                    Another thing to keep in mind is that extrinsic motivation typically is in
                    violent conflict with intrinsic motivation.

                    That is, if your team already is well intrinsically motivated, you might
                    well may things worse by adding extrinsic motivation.

                    If your team isn't, concentrating on fostering intrinsic motivation might
                    prove to be much more worthwhile than dangling the carrot in front of it.
                    It's also harder, of course...

                    Take care, Ilja
                  • Paul Hopkins
                    ... performance incentives to the team? One cannot set targets for a Scrum team, the team sets them itself. The idea behind the question seems to go against
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 1, 2006
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                      >When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer performance incentives to the team?
                       
                      "One" cannot set targets for a Scrum team, the team sets them itself.
                       
                      The idea behind the question seems to go against one of the key principles, namely self-organisation.
                       
                      Regards
                       
                      Paul
                       

                      Von: sentto-1569064-14431-1151644824-paul.hopkins=web.de@... [mailto:sentto-1569064-14431-1151644824-paul.hopkins=web.de@...] Im Auftrag von Pete Deemer
                      Gesendet: Freitag, 30. Juni 2006 07:20
                      An: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Betreff: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Targets, incentives and rewards with SCRUM.

                      By associating an incentive with a particular goal, the risk is that
                      you are subtly (but nonetheless effectively) reverting back into the
                      product-owner- assigning- work-to-the- team mode, and you're setting up a
                      game of asking the team to commit to more than it thinks it should.

                      So what is the effect you're seeking to bring about with the
                      incentive? Does it just boil down to trying to cajole people into
                      working longer hours than they would otherwise?

                      To put it another way, are you just in a very roundabout way proposing
                      to the team that their workday go from 10am-6pm to 10am-8pm instead?
                      If that's what you really want, don't play games, propose it to the
                      team, and see what they want in return. (I say this as an advocate of
                      openness and visibility, not as an advocate of running a team at
                      redline, which is in most cases going to hurt a whole lot more than it
                      helps).

                      --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, "Renji Panicker"
                      <Renji.P@... > wrote:

                      >
                      > Hi
                      everyone,
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > When using the SCRUM process, what
                      targets can one set in order to offer
                      > performance incentives to the
                      team? If I want to tell my team "if you
                      > achieve <X> target in this
                      sprint, you all get a lollipop", what would
                      > that <X> be? I imagine
                      it would be the sprint goals we set at the
                      > beginning, but if anyone has
                      any other suggestions, I'd love to hear it.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      Thanks,
                      >
                      > -/renji
                      >

                    • David H.
                      ... Strictly speaking that is not correct. Every Self-organised system, has so called attractors. See: http://www.calresco.org/sos/sosfaq.htm#2.8 They can be
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 1, 2006
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                        On 01/07/06, Paul Hopkins <paul.hopkins@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > >When using the SCRUM process, what targets can one set in order to offer performance incentives to the team?
                        >
                        > "One" cannot set targets for a Scrum team, the team sets them itself.
                        >
                        > The idea behind the question seems to go against one of the key principles, namely self-organisation.
                        >
                        Strictly speaking that is not correct. Every Self-organised system,
                        has so called attractors.
                        See:
                        http://www.calresco.org/sos/sosfaq.htm#2.8

                        They can be pre-induced. See also
                        http://www.calresco.org/sos/sosfaq.htm#2.10

                        A well placed "target" could be an attractor, but for that to work the
                        team has to accept the attractor. As I said, your statement is
                        pointing toward the right direction, but if I picked an attractor that
                        is actually one for all of the team, it would not hinder
                        self-organisation, but help foster it

                        -d

                        --
                        Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
                        Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail accounts.
                      • Ilja Preuss
                        ... I think a good attractor for an Agile team probably should be along the lines of make the customer happy . Setting such a target certainly is a good
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 3, 2006
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                          > A well placed "target" could be an attractor, but for that to work the
                          > team has to accept the attractor.

                          I think a good attractor for an Agile team probably should be along the
                          lines of "make the customer happy".

                          Setting such a target certainly is a good thing. The more concrete the
                          target becomes, the more it hinders self-organization, and the more it has
                          the potential for dysfunction. In fact I think even trying to make customer
                          happiness measurable has this potential.

                          And putting an incentive on the target multiplies the potential for
                          dysfunction.

                          Cheers, Ilja
                        • Mark Levison
                          For a different perspective on this discuss see Darin Cummins paper The Developement Game [1]. Darin used a competition within the cooperative process to
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 4, 2006
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                            For a different perspective on this discuss see Darin Cummins paper "The Developement Game" [1]. Darin used a competition within the cooperative process to help people get into new habits. After a couple of iterations he removed the framework. So in my perception the game was a useful way to instill new habits into a group that had been struggling with the transition.

                            Mark Levison
                          • Pete Deemer
                            for those interested in reading this paper, it s at http://www.agiledevelopmentconference.com/files/XR4-2.pdf I d be interested in what others think, but this
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 4, 2006
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                              for those interested in reading this paper, it's at
                              http://www.agiledevelopmentconference.com/files/XR4-2.pdf

                              I'd be interested in what others think, but this approach really
                              doesn't sit right with me. It seems to me like a complex framework of
                              individual incentives would inadvertantly cultivate "I" thinking to
                              the detriment of "we" (team) thinking (the latter being imo one of the
                              "quiet accelerators" in scrum); it would invite optimization at the
                              micro level that is suboptimal at the macro level; and it would
                              generate a lot of ceremony and mental activity around things other
                              than the the doing of the work in service of the customer. I guess in
                              the situation described, I'd be more inclined to work with the team to
                              squarely explore what's undermining its motivation, versus creating a
                              game to somehow compensate or distract from those things.

                              --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Levison" <mlevison@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > For a different perspective on this discuss see Darin Cummins paper "The
                              > Developement Game" [1]. Darin used a competition within the cooperative
                              > process to help people get into new habits. After a couple of
                              iterations he
                              > removed the framework. So in my perception the game was a useful way to
                              > instill new habits into a group that had been struggling with the
                              > transition.
                              >
                              > Mark Levison
                              >
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