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User Stories

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  • Mike Cohn
    Hello- I am writing a book for Addison-Wesley/Prentice-Hall that is tentatively called User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development. The book covers
    Message 1 of 13 , May 31, 2003
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      Hello—

       

      I am writing a book for Addison-Wesley/Prentice-Hall that is tentatively called “User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development.” The book covers why user stories work, why they’re often the best approach, how to gather and write them, how to estimate stories, how to create usable plans from your estimates, how to manage projects that use stories and more. The book also includes a full example including stories, estimates, release plans and tests.

       

      The first 11 chapters are available for review. They can be found in the Downloads section at www.userstories.com. That site has a discussion forum or you can provide comments via the Yahoo group userstories@yahoogroups.com and http://groups.yahoo.com/group/userstories/join.

       

      Beyond looking for any comments you can offer on any or all chapters, I would also like to talk to anyone who has had particularly good or bad experiences with stories. No one person’s perspective can fully capture everything we’ve learned about stories in the past few years so I’d greatly appreciate the opportunity to talk with others about their experiences with user stories.

       

      Thank you,

      Mike Cohn

      mike@...

      mike@...

       

       

      Current Table of Contents for “User Stories Applied”

      Part One-Getting Started

      1.      Groundwork

      2.      What Stories Are Not

      3.      Why User Stories?

      4.      Who’s The User?

      5.      User Roles and Personas

      6.      Writing Stories

      7.      Gathering Stories

      Part Two-Estimating and Planning

      8.      Principles of Estimating

      9.      Estimating User Stories

      10.  Why Plans Go Wrong

      11.  Planning a Release

      12.  Planning an Iteration

      Part Three-Stories In The Lifecycle

      13.  Managing with User Stories

      14.  Acceptance Testing User Stories

      15.  A Catalog of Story Smells

      16.  Tools for User Stories

      17.  Using Stories Outside XP

      Part Four-An Example

      18.  The Stories

      19.  Estimating the Stories

      20.  The Release Plan

      21.  The Acceptance Tests

      Appendices

      1. For the Customer
      2. Selected Answers

       

       

    • p.eckert
      I have a qustion about user stories (or features, or whatever people wish to call them). Online there is a bunch of information on what makes a good stoy or
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 28, 2006
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        I have a qustion about user stories (or features, or whatever people
        wish to call them).

        Online there is a bunch of information on what makes a 'good' stoy or
        a 'bad' story, but the examples do not seem to help me much. I do not
        have a context to put them in.

        Would any of you be willing to share with me some of your 'good'
        stories, just so I can visualize how they should look? I would like
        to see how real stories look vs the ones I see in books and online.

        Thanks!
      • Mike Cohn
        Here are the stories that were used during a rewrite last year of the Agile Alliance website. Comments in brackets were put there after the initially writing
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 28, 2006
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          Here are the stories that were used during a rewrite last year of the
          Agile Alliance website. Comments in brackets were put there after the
          initially writing or were added as clarification when this document
          was sent to companies that bid on doing the development work.
          Hopefully these are helpful as good examples to you,
          Regards,
          Mike Cohn


          User Types
          Here are the main user types we envision:
          Site Visitor: any user, registered or not
          AA Member: Someone who has joined the Agile Alliance
          Site Admin: An administrator of the site content (or technology, but
          mostly content).

          Articles [[[http://www.agilealliance.org/articles Articles are
          basically a blog with postings and comments and ratings added. It
          would be nice if Article search could spider out to the content of
          the articles, including PDF, but that's not for the 1st release]]]
          As a site visitor, I want to see a list of the most recently added
          articles.
          As a site visitor, I want all articles on the current site to be
          available on the new site. [[[You can expect me to extract the
          article information and produce a script that's a sequence of calls
          to some Ruby API that fills the article database. I can do that for
          all chunks of info that need to be abstracted, but give me some lead
          time.]]]
          As a site visitor, I'd like to do a free-text search through the
          article database, as well as search by keywords. [[[The only keyword
          is the categories an article is in, which is an attribute.]]]
          As a site visitor, I can rate an article after I read it.
          As a site visitor, I can see the rating for an article.
          As a site visitor who searches for articles, I can sort the results
          list by publication date, date added to the AA site, rating, etc.
          As a site visitor, I can search for articles by word in the title,
          author, or category. [[[Only insofar as that's part of the general
          search.]]]
          As a site admin, I can easily add articles to the site. [[[Any member
          can add an article, but it must be approved.]]]
          As a site visitor, I can recommend an article for inclusion on the
          site. (Sends email to the articles program director) [[[Have them
          fill out the article entry, then ask for approval.]]]

          Profiles
          As a site member, I want to describe myself on my own page in a semi-
          structured way. That is, I can fill in predefined fields, but also
          invent my own. [Note: May split into two stories: one with defined
          fields, one with extensible fields.]
          As a site member, I want to search for other members matching my
          criteria to find help.
          As the site administrator, I want to add new predefined fields.

          News
          As a site visitor, I can see upcoming agile-related events.
          As a site visitor, I can read current agile news. [[[The most recent
          N news and events are summarized on the left sidebar.]]]
          As a site visitor, I can access old news.
          As a site visitor, I can submit news items.
          As a site admin, I can approve news before it’s posted.
          As a site admin, I am emailed whenever news is submitted (so that I
          am aware of it and can decide if I want to approve it).
          As any site visitor, I can subscribe to an RSS feed of news (and
          events? Or are they separate?). [[[In the current site, they're
          separate. I'd just as soon have them be the same thing: postings with
          effective and ending dates. I don't see that the extra cost of having
          two adds value.]]]

          eCommerce
          As a site visitor, I can see upcoming agile-related events.
          As a site visitor, I can read current agile news.
          As a site visitor, I want to buy Agile Alliance themed underwear
          (most likely through CafePress).

          Jobs [[[Please include an estimate for this, but tacked on to the end
          of the release plan.]]]
          As a registered site member (?), I can search for a job. (Probably by
          paging through them at first.)
          As someone who wants to hire, I can post a “help wanted ad”. (Who can
          post such ads? [[[People specially registered – not necessarily
          corporate members]]])
          As a site admin, I need to approve each help wanted ad before it gets
          to the site.
          As a site admin, I am emailed whenever a job is submitted (so that I
          am aware of it and can decide if I want to post it).
          As any site visitor, I can subscribe to an RSS feed of jobs available.

          Misc
          As any site visitor, I can read the agile manifesto. [[[just a link]]]
          As any site visitor, I can always return to the home page with one
          click.
          As any site visitor, I can read the Agile Alliance’s privacy policy.
          As an Agile Alliance member, I can read the Agile Times (current and
          old issues).
          As a site visitor, I can find various contacts for the Agile Alliance
          (e.g., a membership contact, a billing contact, a website contact, etc.)
          As responsible board member, I can view the results of a survey
          someone takes when they join.

          Programs [[[At the moment, everything to do with programs is static
          text and downloadable RTF templates.]]]
          As any site visitor, I can read the charters for existing programs.
          As an AA member, I can complete a form requesting the creation of a
          new program.
          As the head of a program, I can edit the description of my program.
          As a site admin, I need to approve each new program description
          before it gets to the site. (Note: The AA Board actually approves the
          program; a site admin approves the posting of the description.)
          As a site admin, I am emailed whenever a job is submitted (so that I
          am aware of it and can decide if I want to post it).
          As a member, I can be given ownership of a subtree of the site. That
          lets me add, delete, and modify nodes beneath that tree. No need for
          there to be any notification mechanism for changes.]]]

          User Areas
          Every member has control over a subtree of the site, currently …/
          Members/username. They can publish whatever they want there. In the
          current system, they add news and events by making the document in
          their subtree. The documents are gathered up for display by a search
          for everything of a certain type. This is done with the same
          mechanism as the ownership bullet under Programs.

          User Groups
          As any site visitor, I can browse for a user group to join or visit.
          [[[Right now, this is a giant table. Include a way to make it a
          summary of individual user group pages (the way news is handled).
          As any site visitor, I can search (on some TBD criteria) for a user
          group. [[[At most, this can be a text search through all documents
          that are user group descriptions.]]]
          As a registered member, I can complete a form describing a new user
          group to be added to the site. [[[The member gets ownership of the
          form and can edit it as needed.]]]
          As a registered member, I can complete a form updating information
          about a user group. (Only if this member is listed as the contact for
          that group?)
          As a site admin, I need to approve each new user group description
          (and possibly edit) before the new user group shows up on the site.
          As a site admin, I am emailed whenever a new user group description
          is submitted. (I may need to get emailed when a description changes,
          too.)

          Registration
          As any site visitor, I can register with the site. Registering is
          different from joining the Agile Alliance but does give me some
          advantages. (Is this true?)
          As a new (or renewing member), I am asked to complete an optional
          questionnaire.

          Membership
          As a company, I can join the Agile Alliance. This will include
          uploading items related to corporate membership (e.g., a logo of size
          x by y). [[[They fill in a form to join, but that doesn't have to go
          through the same credit card process (they probably need to be
          invoiced manually). A randomly selected logo appears on the bottom
          of every page. Compressed information from all the corporate members
          is displayed on http://www.agilealliance.org/corporatemembers in a
          random order.]]]
          Renewal is similar to joining, but the information is defaulted. Note
          that membership category can change, which changes the price.
          As a member, I can join the Agile Alliance at one of various rates
          (student, hardship, etc.)
          A corporate membership can specify a set of domains. Anyone whose
          email address is at one of those domains becomes a "sponsored" member
          and skips the credit card page.
          If I pay for a membership, I am given the option to receive
          merchandise of a particular value from Café Press.
          As a member with short-term memory problems, I can have the system
          email me a new password or a password reminder, possibly my username
          (unless we use email for that [[[we don't, and we should preserve the
          old member names]]]), and so on.
          At weekly intervals, the site looks for members who are within two
          months of expiring. If they have not been nagged within the last
          month, they're sent a reminder to renew.
          Memberships do not actually expire until a two-month grace period
          passes. Expired members within the grace period are nagged as above.
          A sponsored member's expiration date is the expiration date for the
          sponsoring corporation. The corporate contact gets nagging email.
          When a corporate membership is in the grace period, sponsored members
          get nagging email. Sponsored members disappear when the corporate
          membership disappears.

          Roadmap [[[This is just a matter of giving certain people ownership
          of the roadmap subtree.]]]
          As any site visitor, I can view roadmaps to various aspects of agile
          software development.
          As the maintainer of the roadmap program, I can edit roadmaps.

          Books
          As any site visitor, I can see recently released books. [[[Just a
          list of all books.]]]
          Members can write blurbs for their own book. They are submitted for
          approval just like news and events.
          A randomly selected book, its image, and its blurb are displayed on
          the front page.
          As a site visitor, I want to buy books after reading member reviews
          (e.g., through a partnership with Amazon).
          As a site visitor, I can find a book by subject area, technique or
          practice, title or author, or by browsing.
          As a registered member, I can write a review of a book. A review will
          include a 1-5 star rating. (Note that this is different from
          articles: books are like Amazon and to rate it you must also review it.)

          Questions
          As a registered member, I can post a question into a Q&A section.
          As a site visitor, I can read the Q&A section.
          As a registered member, I can respond to a question in the Q&A section.
          As any site visitor, I can subscribe to an RSS feed of the Q&A section.
          QUESTION: Does any of this need to be moderated? Seems too tough

          FAQs
          As a site visitor, I can read FAQs.
          As a site admin, I can maintain an FAQ section.
          As a registered member (or any?), I can do a full-text search of the
          FAQs.

          Blogging
          There's enough of a blog to support the carnival of the agilists: a
          few people can post, no comments currently.

          Arbitrary Pages
          [[[Pages can be written in either HTML or some sort of wiki-like
          text. It doesn't matter what the formatting rules are, and it doesn't
          have to cover more than the basics. If they want more, they can do
          HTML.]]]
          Being able to subscribe to changes to any arbitrary page (subtree?)
          is desirable but not absolutely required.
          There should be a way to subscribe to site-wide changes, and to have
          such changes appear in a summary like that of the right sidebar at
          http://www.agilealliance.org/aanpo.
          As a page owner, I can see the pages at any node in the tree and
          delete them.
          Some pages should only be visible to administrators.
          Some pages should only be visible to members.

          User management
          As an administrator, I can search for members by email address,
          username, real name, or substring of those.
          As an administrator, I can delete a user.
          As an administrator, I can either see a user's password or reset it
          to some random value (which is then mailed to the user).



          On Feb 28, 2006, at 11:44 AM, p.eckert wrote:

          > I have a qustion about user stories (or features, or whatever people
          > wish to call them).
          >
          > Online there is a bunch of information on what makes a 'good' stoy or
          > a 'bad' story, but the examples do not seem to help me much. I do not
          > have a context to put them in.
          >
          > Would any of you be willing to share with me some of your 'good'
          > stories, just so I can visualize how they should look? I would like
          > to see how real stories look vs the ones I see in books and online.
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-
          > unsubscribe@...
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Ron Jeffries
          ... There s a wide range of good . See my remarks on Card, Conversation, Confirmation for reasons why I find the following stories just fine.
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 28, 2006
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            On Tuesday, February 28, 2006, at 10:44:46 AM, p.eckert wrote:

            > I have a qustion about user stories (or features, or whatever people
            > wish to call them).

            > Online there is a bunch of information on what makes a 'good' stoy or
            > a 'bad' story, but the examples do not seem to help me much. I do not
            > have a context to put them in.

            > Would any of you be willing to share with me some of your 'good'
            > stories, just so I can visualize how they should look? I would like
            > to see how real stories look vs the ones I see in books and online.

            There's a wide range of "good". See my remarks on Card,
            Conversation, Confirmation for reasons why I find the following
            stories just fine.
            http://www.xprogramming.com/xpmag/EXPCardConversationConfirmation.htm

            When ATM is out of cash, display an error message until customer
            hits Enter key or for 15 seconds. Then return customer's card.

            Overtime work accrues hours at 1.5 times hours worked on any day
            except Sunday. On Sunday, hours accrue at 2 times hours worked.

            After ten days, remove a new book from the "Just Came In" display
            page on the Library Web Site.

            Customer can order paint color and interior color according to
            this table:
            PAINT INTERIOR
            Red Black, Beige
            Black Black, Red, Silver, Beige
            Green Black, Beige
            Silver Black, Red, Silver

            A team that does not work according to the Card, Conversation,
            Confirmation practice may need to write more down. This is often
            inefficient, but sometimes is arguably desirable.

            Ron Jeffries
            www.XProgramming.com
            Assume that anything you didn't like was the funny stuff.
            -- Jim Shore
          • Jeff
            Another scrum question... The more I do scrum the more I suspect XP is more appropriate for applying scrum-like methodology to developing software. After
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 28, 2006
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              Another scrum question...

              The more I "do scrum" the more I suspect XP is more appropriate for applying
              scrum-like methodology to developing software.

              After all, scrum (afaict) embodies a lot of XP's "project methodology"
              aspects, though scrum does not address any coding/programming aspects.

              I'm starting to find that effective scrum requires programming models such
              as TDD. XP already has this all sorted out.

              Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?

              Jeff
            • Ron Jeffries
              ... Many do. Much of what I ve been doing lately is introducing XP practices to Scrum teams. The thing is that for Scrum to work, the team has to come up
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 28, 2006
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                On Tuesday, February 28, 2006, at 7:07:31 PM, Jeff wrote:

                > Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?

                Many do. Much of what I've been doing lately is introducing XP
                practices to Scrum teams.

                The thing is that for Scrum to work, the team has to come up somehow
                with technical practices that let them produce software that is
                known to work by the end of each Sprint. XP offers core practices
                that are a good start at doing this.

                Some time ago, if I'm not mistaken, Mike Beedle talked about a blend
                of XP and Scrum that he called XP@Scrum. More recently he has taken
                the position that practices much like the XP practices have always
                been a part of Scrum. That may be the case, though they aren't
                mentioned in the Scrum books, as far as I know.

                But primacy of invention or whose name is on the book isn't what's
                important. What's important is that a Scrum team needs to come up
                with some coherent and effective set of technical practices, in
                order to do their jobs effectively. The XP literature offers one
                convenient package of practices that are a good start.

                Regards,

                Ron Jeffries
                www.XProgramming.com
                One test is worth a thousand expert opinions.
                -- Bill Nye (The Science Guy)
              • Mishkin Berteig
                I generally agree with what you say Ron, but many of the Scrum teams that I have coached do not have access to the incredible tools used for TDD, continuous
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 1, 2006
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                  I generally agree with what you say Ron, but many of the Scrum teams that I have coached do not have access to the incredible tools used for TDD, continuous integration, etc.  This is usually due to the technologies involved not being compatible, but sometimes can be related to corporate standards that dis-allow open-source software.  Even with these barriers, as a coach I try to find ways for the team to do these things.  Sometimes that means building our own testing harness from scratch, for example.
                   
                  I came to Scrum via agile via XP.  I hold TDD, pair programming and other XP practices very dear to my heart.  For new software development, Scrum might be a good place to start, but XP is what makes things really hum.  When a team is doing things that aren't new software development, XP starts to make less and less sense.  A recent database migration project I was coaching had no need for some of the engineering practices that XP sets up.  Likewise for a software system upgrade project.  Both of those were done essentially using Scrum with some minor modifications.  And unfortunately (for little me who likes XP) there was no reasonable way to introduce XP practices given the various constraints.
                   
                  Mishkin Berteig


                  Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                  On Tuesday, February 28, 2006, at 7:07:31 PM, Jeff wrote:

                  > Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?

                  Many do. Much of what I've been doing lately is introducing XP
                  practices to Scrum teams.

                  The thing is that for Scrum to work, the team has to come up somehow
                  with technical practices that let them produce software that is
                  known to work by the end of each Sprint. XP offers core practices
                  that are a good start at doing this.

                  Some time ago, if I'm not mistaken, Mike Beedle talked about a blend
                  of XP and Scrum that he called XP@Scrum. More recently he has taken
                  the position that practices much like the XP practices have always
                  been a part of Scrum. That may be the case, though they aren't
                  mentioned in the Scrum books, as far as I know.

                  But primacy of invention or whose name is on the book isn't what's
                  important. What's important is that a Scrum team needs to come up
                  with some coherent and effective set of technical practices, in
                  order to do their jobs effectively. The XP literature offers one
                  convenient package of practices that are a good start.

                  Regards,

                  Ron Jeffries
                  www.XProgramming.com
                  One test is worth a thousand expert opinions.
                  -- Bill Nye (The Science Guy)



                  To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                  To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
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                • John Brothers
                  Indeed. We use Scrum, and the following XP practices along with it: 1) User Stories 2) Test-Driven Development 3) Continuous Integration 4) Heavy access to
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 1, 2006
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                    Indeed.  We use Scrum, and the following XP practices along with it:
                     
                    1) User Stories
                    2) Test-Driven Development
                    3) Continuous Integration
                    4) Heavy access to customer proxy
                    5) Optimize later instead of earlier
                    6) Refactor as necessary
                     
                    So far I've been quite pleased with the results.
                     
                    John


                    From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Jeffries
                    Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 10:19 PM
                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum and XP...

                    On Tuesday, February 28, 2006, at 7:07:31 PM, Jeff wrote:

                    > Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?

                    Many do. Much of what I've been doing lately is introducing XP
                    practices to Scrum teams.

                    The thing is that for Scrum to work, the team has to come up somehow
                    with technical practices that let them produce software that is
                    known to work by the end of each Sprint. XP offers core practices
                    that are a good start at doing this.

                    Some time ago, if I'm not mistaken, Mike Beedle talked about a blend
                    of XP and Scrum that he called XP@Scrum. More recently he has taken
                    the position that practices much like the XP practices have always
                    been a part of Scrum. That may be the case, though they aren't
                    mentioned in the Scrum books, as far as I know.

                    But primacy of invention or whose name is on the book isn't what's
                    important. What's important is that a Scrum team needs to come up
                    with some coherent and effective set of technical practices, in
                    order to do their jobs effectively. The XP literature offers one
                    convenient package of practices that are a good start.

                    Regards,

                    Ron Jeffries
                    www.XProgramming.com
                    One test is worth a thousand expert opinions.
                      -- Bill Nye (The Science Guy)

                  • Culpepper Rick
                    Hello, everyone! I am a new member of this forum and am just learning about Scrum and XP. I have recently joined this organization, taking over a project that
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 1, 2006
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                      Hello, everyone!

                      I am a new member of this forum and am just learning about Scrum and XP.
                      I have recently joined this organization, taking over a project that was
                      badly off-track.

                      I am interested in using both Scrum and XP to revamp our development
                      process for a mission-critical internal application. I have one team
                      member who has some experience with Scrum and XP who introduced me to
                      Scrum. I was already somewhat familiar with XP, but had never used it on
                      any projects.

                      I need some help getting started and wonder what approaches others have
                      used to bootstrap Scrum and/or XP in their organizations. I'm open to
                      training or consulting or whatever other means people have used to
                      successfully transition to Scrum/XP in other organizations.

                      Any help and/or advice that anyone can offer is very welcome.

                      Thanks!

                      Rick Culpepper
                      Rick.Culpepper@...
                    • Ron Jeffries
                      ... I would suggest ScrumMaster training for yourself and perhaps other key people in the organization, and would suggest that you bring in a competent coach
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 1, 2006
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                        On Wednesday, March 1, 2006, at 7:03:39 AM, Culpepper Rick wrote:

                        > I need some help getting started and wonder what approaches others have
                        > used to bootstrap Scrum and/or XP in their organizations. I'm open to
                        > training or consulting or whatever other means people have used to
                        > successfully transition to Scrum/XP in other organizations.

                        I would suggest ScrumMaster training for yourself and perhaps other
                        key people in the organization, and would suggest that you bring in
                        a competent coach in Agile Software Development. This individual
                        would introduce all the stakeholders to Agile, and would be able to
                        assess your existing situation from an Agile viewpoint and suggest
                        first and continuing steps toward improvement.

                        Ron Jeffries
                        www.XProgramming.com
                        Comments lie. Code doesn't.
                      • Stephen J. Bobick
                        ... Scrum and XP best-practices are complementary, not mutually exclusive. I prefer to use Scrum and incorporate best practices like TDD, continuous
                        Message 11 of 13 , Mar 1, 2006
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                          On Tuesday, February 28, 2006, at 7:07:31 PM, Jeff wrote:
                          >
                          >> Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?

                          Scrum and XP best-practices are complementary, not mutually exclusive.

                          I prefer to use Scrum and incorporate best practices like TDD, continuous integration, and pair programming. Scrum provides an excellent structure for planning, executing, and reviewing iterations. Without this structure, or an analogous replacement, XP best-practices in isolation becomes chaotic at worst, and lose focus of the bigger picture at best.

                          -- Stephen
                        • Clinton Keith
                          Also keep in mind that many Scrum teams are not exclusively composed of programmers. Our Scrum teams average about 50/50. The programmers pair and do TDD,
                          Message 12 of 13 , Mar 1, 2006
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                            Also keep in mind that many Scrum teams are not exclusively composed of
                            programmers. Our Scrum teams average about 50/50. The programmers pair
                            and do TDD, but planning and tasks breakdown follow Scrum practices.

                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff
                            > Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 7:08 PM
                            > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum and XP...
                            >
                            >
                            > Another scrum question...
                            >
                            > The more I "do scrum" the more I suspect XP is more appropriate for
                            > applying
                            > scrum-like methodology to developing software.
                            >
                            > After all, scrum (afaict) embodies a lot of XP's "project methodology"
                            > aspects, though scrum does not address any coding/programming aspects.
                            >
                            > I'm starting to find that effective scrum requires programming models
                            such
                            > as TDD. XP already has this all sorted out.
                            >
                            > Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?
                            >
                            > Jeff
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
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                          • Schiel, James (MED US)
                            Ditto...this is exactly the structure that we ve set up in my company. Jim Schiel________________________________From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            Message 13 of 13 , Mar 7, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Ditto...this is exactly the structure that we've set up in my company.
                               
                              Jim Schiel


                              From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Stephen J. Bobick
                              Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 1:58 PM
                              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum and XP...

                              On Tuesday, February 28, 2006, at 7:07:31 PM, Jeff wrote:
                              >
                              >> Do scrum teams end up migrating to XP?

                              Scrum and XP best-practices are complementary, not mutually exclusive.

                              I prefer to use Scrum and incorporate best practices like TDD, continuous integration, and pair programming.  Scrum provides an excellent structure for planning, executing, and reviewing iterations.  Without this structure, or an analogous replacement, XP best-practices in isolation becomes chaotic at worst, and lose focus of the bigger picture at best.

                              -- Stephen

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