Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Do you count weekends in your burn down chart?

Expand Messages
  • Ilja Preuss
    ... Ah, I didn t understand that for them part beforehand. I m certainly not suggesting that someone outside the team should draw the trend line and tell the
    Message 1 of 51 , Jun 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      > David has done a nice job clarifying my point. I don't like
      > metrics at the sprint task level at all, especially metrics
      > that try to imply whether the team is going to finish the
      > sprint *for them*. This should be a call the team makes
      > considering the history of the sprint to date (recorded as
      > the burndown), what is left to do, and the risk/uncertainty
      > impacting the sprint currently.

      Ah, I didn't understand that "for them" part beforehand.

      I'm certainly not suggesting that someone outside the team should draw the
      trend line and tell the team "that's when you will be finished".
      Fortunately, that's not the only way to use a trend line.


      > If the ScrumMaster wants to draw a trendline then I would be
      > suspicious about the liberties they are taking in making
      > assumptions from that trendline.

      I would be concerned about anything the ScrumMaster does in that direction
      without talking with the team about it.

      > If the team wants a
      > trendline then again I think something is wrong because the
      > team is asking for a crutch to tell them how things will turn
      > out in the sprint. In my experience, Scrum teams know how
      > they are doing each day if there are well-run daily scrum
      > meetings and generally good communication across the team.

      Yes, they know how they are doing each day. Seeing the long term
      consequences and trends is a little bit harder, in my experience. You are
      right that a trend line is just a crutch, but it is one that can help the
      team consider their long term performance. I've seen our team discussing
      what the trend will likely look like, projecting different versions on the
      burn up chart (some of them not even linear), and the result seems to be a
      much more precise prediction than pure gut feel would have provided -
      especially after getting some experience with this practice.

      Cheers, Ilja

      --
      "Information Radiation in Practice -
      Communication Tools for Colocated Teams"

      Tutorial at the XP2006 conference, Oulu
      www.xp2006.org
      17.06.2006
    • Nicholas Cancelliere
      I do not unless your team is planning on working weekends all the time, and lets hope not! :-) -Nick ... From: Ilja Preuss To:
      Message 51 of 51 , Jun 24, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I do not unless your team is planning on working weekends all the time, and lets hope not!  :-)
         
        -Nick
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, June 02, 2006 1:13 AM
        Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Do you count weekends in your burn down chart?

        > Ron,
        > I hope your question is rhetorical because clearly I can't
        > answer something in a yahoo group posting that you've not
        > been able to achieve in 2 years of work.

        I didn't see anything in Ron's post suggesting that he wasn't able to help
        those teams.

        > I agree this is a problem and I see it often myself.  I don't
        > think dumping additional metrics on top of the sprint
        > burndown is going to solve this problem though.

        Well, yes - just dumping it on the sprint burndown is probably not the most
        effective way to use a trendline; it's certainly nothing I would suggest to
        do.


        Take care, Ilja

        --
        "Information Radiation in Practice -
        Communication Tools for Colocated Teams"

        Tutorial at the XP2006 conference, Oulu
        www.xp2006.org
        17.06.2006

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.