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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Government funded projects

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  • Jeff Sutherland
    Mary, This is why Jarzombek reported in 1999 that out of a total cost of $37 on DOD projects analyzed, 75% failed or were never used and only 2% were used
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 29, 2003
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      Mary,

      This is why Jarzombek reported in 1999 that out of a total cost of $37 on
      DOD projects analyzed, 75% failed or were never used and only 2% were used
      without extensive modification. DOD changed their spec to dump the waterfall
      method and move to iterative development over this.

      It also reminds me of Goldratt's book on Project Management where the
      students in the story visit a construction business to find out if they have
      project overruns as is common in software development. The answer was, "We
      always have cost overruns. We never make any money on the initial bid
      because we always lowball it. All our money is made on overruns and we would
      be out of business without them."

      So the "can do" attitude is really a smoke screen for "let's rip off the
      government for as much money as we can get."

      The argument for these people is that SCRUM would allow them to get stuff
      done more quickly and still stiff the government. I once worked for a
      department chairman that had a very effective strategy of completing his
      next grant's work on the current grant's money. He then could write a very
      compelling proposal for the next grant (which was already done) and always
      had plenty of extra money for his research projects. This is probably
      illegal, but in the larger scheme of things is more moral that what the team
      you describe was doing.

      Jeff Sutherland



      Message: 4
      Date: Tue, 29 Apr 2003 10:07:21 -0500
      From: "Mary Poppendieck" <mary@...>
      Subject: RE: Culture clash

      I recently ran into yet another reason why people do not raise a red
      flag when things are not going well. I was at a site where extremely
      time-critical programs are government funded, and frequently
      under-funded. I was extolling the key virtue of SCRUM - that you will
      know very early if the project is 'doable'. The most senior person in
      the room responded: "But we don't WANT to know if a project can be
      done.
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