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Re: [scrumdevelopment] academic research

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  • Fabian Ritzmann
    ... This site lists all sorts of articles on agile software development, some of them academic: http://www.aanpo.org/articles/index ... Take a look at the
    Message 1 of 64 , Apr 3, 2003
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      Julio Hartmann wrote:

      > I'm a Master Degree Student in Computer Science, and I'm planning to
      > research the agile software development methods. I'm not really sure what to
      > do yet. Because the agile publications are very new, there is few academic
      > resources on the subject. I wonder if you heard of any academic research
      > going on related to Scrum or other agile methods?

      This site lists all sorts of articles on agile software development,
      some of them academic:

      http://www.aanpo.org/articles/index

      > Any ideas would be appreciated. Maybe I could make a comparison between
      > several methods, such as Scrum, XP and FDD. But for doing that, I would have
      > to use a scientific way to compare the methods. Or maybe I can use a well
      > known process framework as the baseline for the comparison.

      Take a look at the publications of Prof. Tichy's Empirical Informatics
      Research Group in Karlsruhe:

      http://www.ipd.uka.de/~exp/

      Fabian
    • Dave Hoover
      Mike, ... Agreed! ... I think we struggle with researching previous art because most of the leading agile thinkers are in the trenches, not in academia.
      Message 64 of 64 , Apr 12, 2003
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        Mike,

        > I think it is fine to assume that it is "independent
        > thinking". This is a good thing because it confirms
        > that at least 2 people can reach the same conclusions
        > and can validate their experiences and explain
        > the world the same way.

        Agreed!

        > (You could always
        > ask the question the other way: Is the stuff
        > from "Growing Software" coming from somewhere else
        > since our stuff was published 5-7 years ago
        > i.e. PLOP3 proceedings, PLOPD4 book, etc. I think
        > it is safe to assume "independent thinking" because
        > our industry is famous for not researching
        > "previous art". In hard Science this would actually
        > be an embarrassment.)

        I think we struggle with researching "previous art" because most of the
        leading agile thinkers are in the trenches, not in academia. This is why I was
        excited when I saw the overlap between the Scrum book and "Growing
        Software". I figured that both the Scrum folks and Roy had probably not had
        the opportunity to find each other.

        I look forward to the outcome of future collaborations between agile thinkers
        who find complexity science applicable to software development.

        --Dave
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