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Re: [scrumdevelopment] "Winning at Change"

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  • Michael Spayd
    Thanks for this article, Tobias. John Kotter s book on the same topic, *Leading Change*, is also very good, especially for those interested in large-scale
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 4, 2005
      Thanks for this article, Tobias. John Kotter's book on the same topic, Leading Change, is also very good, especially for those interested in large-scale organization change. I also recommend Daryl Conner's Managing at the Speed of Change.
       
       
      Michael

      --
      Michael K. Spayd
      COGILITY, LLC
      "Business Mind, Social Heart"
      michael.spayd@...
      720.300.5286
       
       
      On 12/2/05, Tobias Mayer <tobyanon@...> wrote:
      I stumbled across this 1998 article a few minutes ago. 
      Thought it may be of interest to some Enterprise Scrum practitioners out there.
       
      I liked this section on leadership:
       
      ...However, the most notable trait of great leaders, certainly of great change leaders, is their quest for learning. They show an exceptional willingness to push themselves out of their own comfort zones, even after they have achieved a great deal. They continue to take risks, even when there is no obvious reason for them to do so. And they are open to people and ideas, even at a time in life when they might reasonably think -- because of their successes -- that they know everything. Often they are driven by goals or ideals that are bigger than what any individual can accomplish, and that gap is an engine pushing them toward continuous learning.
       
      I especially the bolded bit.  Anyone else identify with that behaviour? ;-)
       
      The author comes down firmly on the side of middle-management - which should satisfy some of you...
      "I have found that the biggest obstacles to change are not middle managers but, more often, those who work just a level or two below the CEO -- vice presidents, directors, general managers, and others who haven't yet made it to "the top" and may have the most to lose in a change. "
       
      Also note that the article endorses the "success is our enemy" comment, overheard at the Scrum Gathering - I think it was Jon Spence who said it (but he may deny it!).
       
      Tobias

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