Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

57166Re: [scrumdevelopment] Spike stories - estimation and acceptance criteria ?

Expand Messages
  • srinivas chillara
    Aug 28, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Ron,
      Fair point. So spike items need not be (preferably should be) in the format of a user story, as long as they are comparable, especially to the PO. 

      It's interesting you say "As a ..." format is just training wheels.
      I have seen it to be very useful well into a project/product to keep the focus on the user's needs. I've seen the format of the user story so useful and the conversations it can generate (esp with a cross fucntional team) progress discussion on functionality much faster than otherwise; I think we can just continue to use it. 
      Why do you say these are just training wheels, what is a better option you have in mind?  In what way could this format be a hindrance?

      cheers
      Srinivas

      From: Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...>
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, 28 August 2013 2:35 PM
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Spike stories - estimation and acceptance criteria ?

       
      Srinivas,

      On Aug 28, 2013, at 2:07 AM, srinivas chillara <ceezone@...> wrote:

      POs can (and should) understand items that are not written as user stories as well.

      People can and should understand many things. However, Product Backlog items all need to bear business value that is understandable enough so that the Product Owner (and any observer) can compare them to decide which to do first.

      I don't care what format they are written in. The "As a" format, for example, is training wheels and probably an obstacle to progress after the first few weeks. 

      Scrum backlog items, in order to be ordered properly, need to be comparable in the mind of the Product Owner. If they are comparable it doesn't matter how they are written, they are OK. If they are not comparable, it doesn't matter how they are written: they are trouble.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Sometimes I give myself admirable advice, but I am incapable of taking it.
      -- Mary Wortley Montagu





    • Show all 17 messages in this topic