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56410Re: Another User Story terminology thread - Epics/Themes

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  • pascal.rieux@rocketmail.com
    Dec 20, 2012
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      My 2 cents:

      With the teams I coach, we use the following definition:
      * Epic = unclear requirement, candidate to refinement and to a potential split into stories or - when requirement is clear enough - container for several user stories. The later case being equivalent to feature,
      * Story = low level requirement either functional or technical

      NB: we are using greenhopper thus adopted definitions matching the tool usage to keep things simple.

      Pascal Rieux
      Scrum Master

      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Michael Wollin <yahoo@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've seen "feature" used as theme - an epic or a collection of stories related to a function, like printing. Mingle rolls stories into epics.
      >
      > On Dec 19, 2012, at 8:25 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:
      >
      > No, it's not what you're thinking... at least it's not about an article or anything like that.
      >
      > Here it is...
      >
      > In the earlier works on User Stories (Cohn, at least -- maybe there's more), the concept of an "Epic" was something like a "big story" or "a story too big to fit into a sprint". A "Theme" was something like "a collection of related stories."
      >
      > In more recent years, I haven't seen much use of the term Theme, but I have seen quite a bit of use of the term Epic, to mean *either* a big story, *or* a collection of Stories(thus taking on the meaning of a Theme).
      >
      > I've noticed this in the last few years. I first noticed it in one of my clients 3 years ago(especially in use at the D/Director/VP level), then I noticed it in Pivotal Tracker and Greenhopper in the last year.
      >
      > Has anyone else seen this use(misuse?) of the terminology? Do we (as a community, and as practitioners) care that the term has been co-opted? Is the impact so small as to not worry about it?
      >
      > -------
      > Charles Bradley
      > Scrum Coach-in-Chief
      > ScrumCrazy.com
      >
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