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55704Re: [scrumdevelopment] Weakness in Product Management?

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  • Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSP CSM PSM
    Sep 6, 2012
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      Paul,

      > I think these are immensely hard questions to answer.
      > there are good reasons why it product management  isn't going to improve
      to the extent you perhaps would like it to any time soon.

      I would agree that determining and/or projecting ROI can be difficult at times, but I think for a company to be successful, one has to give a go at trying to project ROI, and then measuring(validating) the ROI in some meaningful way.

      Also, nothing ever improves to the extent(or fast enough) as I would like it to.  :-)  Having said that, I think we as a community have a lot of work to do in this area.  I'm not familiar enough with the PdM industry to even say how we go about that, or what already exists out there.  I'm just saying... it's next, and we need to get crackin on it.
       
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      Charles Bradley
      http://www.ScrumCrazy.com




      From: Paul Hudson <phudson@...>
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, September 6, 2012 8:44 AM
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Weakness in Product Management?



      > I haven't had very much visibility into the ROI or TCO of a system.  My guess is that many Pdm's also don't have this visibility and that is part of the problem.

      What is the RoI of adding a new feature to the spellcheck function of MS Word? Or changing the end story of the next installment of a wildly popular video game franchise?

      I think these are immensely hard questions to answer.. They require predicting the future  the subjective opinions of people. They're affected by the actions of competitors, the personal biases of key reviewers and bloggers, and many other factors.

      Product management is a marketing problem (marketing being much more than promotion). As such, it's qualitatively different from technical issues like software development. I don't think there is an equivalent to TDD, for instance (surveys. focus groups, beta programs and trials are attempts at this, but they;'re not reliable, not least because people don't know what they really like if they don't know it's possible or cannot evalate how it will really be like)

      Not all of this applies to internal products, of course, but a surprising amount does, in my experience (recent internal arguments about document management systems show the success or not is dependent on a lot more than how well it works technically).

      Which isn't to say that it could be improved a lot in many companies, but there are good reasons why it product management  isn't going to improve to the extent you perhaps would like it to any time soon.




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