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53427Re: [kanbandev] Kanban - a success story and a humbling experience

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  • Andrew Pham
    Nov 30, 2011
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      Hi all,


      For your fyi, please find below the table of contents of my upcoming book on "Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) IT-wide Implementation" along with a foreword from a CEO and former CFO/CIO.


      There are three or four case studies on both Agile (Scrum) and Kanban (Lean) in the book...


      Best regards,


      Andrew Pham


      Author of Scrum in Action, Agile Project Management and Development in the Real-World
      http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1-1

      and of "Business-Driven IT-Wide Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) Implementation" (reviewed and upcoming)


      - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -


      Foreword


      In our globally competitive and fast changing business world, better and more productive projects are to the 21st century what better assembly lines were to the 20th.  Unfortunately, the conventional project management approach fails to deliver on their initial goals an alarming 70% of the time. Then enter Agile (Scrum) and more increasingly Kanban (Lean) with all the benefits they bring along.

      Imagine how much better your software team’s work would be if you were continually able, in some cases, to act upon what team members did yesterday, what they are going to do today, and whether or not there are any obstacles to solve. Also, imagine how much better, in some other cases, you could help improve your software team’s work  by not introducing a completely new process to the teams but instead visualize their current process while trying to optimize it with proven approaches, Kanban among others, coming from the best just-in-time systems in the world, the Toyota Production System (TPS).

      As a logical sequence to their first book, Scrum in Action, Agile Project Management and Software Development, which is geared towards the project teams, Andrew Pham and his co-authors’ new book is decidedly geared towards the business and IT executives who would like to know how to successfully deploy Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) on a large scale to IT in their effort to increase their teams’ software delivery capability.

      As a former CFO and CIOxxxxxxxx I truly appreciate Andrew Pham and his co-authors for having developed in this book a comprehensive and easy-to-follow guide for the busy executives. Likewise, I also truly appreciate the fact that authors’ approach also factors in change, communication, a sense of urgency, clear and measurable goals, political realities and infrastructure needs—all critical ingredients for success.

      Rather than blindly deploy Agile as it has been the trend during the past few years, the authors rightly suggest that we should first assess the environment and identify the organization’s business goals first. Only then we will know what Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) concepts or techniques we will need and how to combine them most effectively to solve our enterprise’s problems.

      In my book, xxxxxxxx, I wrote that speed is the new quality—with a spirit of action, imperfection, forgiveness and continuous improvement needed.  I am glad that Andrew Pham and his co-authors’ approach also factors in a similar type of purposeful adaptation—to deliver results by establishing a clear set of goals, by assessing the environment and by coming up with creative solutions that more often than not a combination of Agile and Lean and by regularly inspecting the execution’s progress and by rapidly acting upon lessons learned as well as adapting to the business’s external environment or change in business strategy!

      Incorporating Agile (Scrum) and Kanban (Lean) principles and practices into your software development organization on a large scale and in a creative way will go a long way to increasing value and reducing the risks.  For this reason alone, you will find it - as I do - very worthwhile to spend time reading this very practical book.


      xxxxxxxxxxx 

                                                                                                                              

      CEO, xxxxxxxxxxx, Inc.                                                                                                                                Former CFO and CIO of xxxxxxxxx


      - - - - - - - - - - -

      Business-Driven IT-Wide Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) Implementation

      A Practical Guide for Business and IT Executives

      Table of Contents

      Foreword........... 8

      About the authors........... 12

      Acknowledgements........... 12

      What Is This Book About?........... 15

      Who Should Read This Book?........... 15

      Part I: Setting up the stage........... 18

      1.            The ineffectiveness of IT project management and development            18

      1.1         What are the reasons for IT failure?         18

      1.2         Why Command and Control and the Waterfall life cycle are bad together?         19

      2.            A summarized introduction to Agile (Scrum) and Kanban (Lean)            21

      2.1         What is Agile?         21

      2.1.1     The Agile Manifesto     21

      2.1.2     Example of a known Agile process: Scrum     22

      2.1.3     Agile practices in a nutshell     26

      2.2         What is Kanban (Lean)?         27

      2.2.1     What is Lean?     27

      2.2.2     What is Kanban?     29

      2.2.3     Kanban practices in a nutshell     41

      2.3         Similarities and differences between Agile and Kanban and Scrum and Kanban         42

      2.4         Summary         45

      3.            Why would we need Kanban (Lean) and Agile or Scrum, rather than just Agile or Scrum alone?            46

      3.1         A preliminary case study         46

      3.2         Why process improvement for the sake of process improvement will fail?         51

      Part II: A business goals-driven enterprise software delivery improvement framework........... 52

      4.            A seven-step software delivery improvement framework            52

      4.1         Description         53

      4.2         Summary         57

      5.            Step 1 – Identify the (business) sponsor and her/his needs and goals            58

      5.1         Identify the (business) sponsor(s)         58

      5.2         Identify the sponsor(s)’ needs and goals         58

      5.3         Summary         63

      6.            Step 2 – Perform environment boundary identification and assessment            64

      6.1         How to identify the environment’s boundary         64

      6.2         Assess the identified environment         69

      6.3         Summary         74

      7.            Step 3 – Scenarios and risks envisioning            75

      7.1         From goals to solution scenarios (in passing by the assessment)         76

      7.2         How to identify risks (for the different scenarios)         81

      7.3         Scenarios consolidation         83

      7.4         Summary         85

      8.            Step 4 – Develop the detailed plan            86

      8.1         Anatomy of a detailed scenario (or action plan)         86

      8.2         The seven characteristics of a good plan         90

      8.3         Summary         92

      9.            Step 5 – Implement the plan            93

      9.1         Set up the implementation structure         93

      9.2         The seven qualities of a good execution         95

      9.3         Summary         96

      10.            Step 6 - Inspecting the implementation’s progress            97

      10.1         Why regular progress inspection is critical?         97

      10.2         What to inspect?         97

      10.2.1     What to inspect at the plan’s level     97

      10.2.2     What to inspect at the action items’ level     99

      10.3         Summary         103

      11.            Step 7 - Adapting the plan (as needed)            104

      11.1         Different types of change nature         104

      11.1.1     Strategic change     105

      11.1.2     Operational change     105

      11.2         Examples of adaptations         105

      11.2.1     Strategic impact     105

      11.2.2     Operational impact     107

      11.3         Summary         108

      Part III: Retrospectives........... 109

      12.            Lessons Learned            109

      13.            Glossary            112

      Part IV: Appendices........... 117

      14.            Appendix A: From the PMO (Project Management Office) to the PDO (Project Delivery Office)            117

      15.            Appendix B: Change Management            120

      16.            Appendix C: The two most important tools of a good software development infrastructure            124

      Part V: Case Studies........... 125

      17.            Case Study 1: “Modified Agile combined with modified Kanban”            125

      Step 1: Identify business sponsor and her or his needs and goals............ 125

      Step 2: Perform ATP’s environment boundary identification and assessment............ 132

      Step 3 - ATP Scenarios envisioning............ 146

      STEP 4 - Developing the detailed action plan for ATP............ 156

      STEP 5 - Execute the ATP action plan............ 162

      STEP 6 - Inspecting APT execution’s progress............ 165

      STEP 7 - Adapting the ATP plan............ 171

      Lessons learned:............ 172

      18.            Case Study 2: “(Customized) Agile and Kanban Co-Existence”            174

      Step 1: Identify business sponsor and her or his needs and goals............ 174

      Step 2: Perform TFS’ s environment boundary identification and assessment............ 181

      Step 3 - TFS Scenarios envisioning............ 185

      STEP 4 - Developing the detailed action plan for TFS............ 192

      STEP 5 - Execute the TFS action plan............ 196

      STEP 6 – Inspect progress of TFS’s action plan............ 197

      STEP 7 – Adapt the TFS action plan............ 202

      Lessons learned:............ 206

      19.            Case Study 3: “Customer Satisfaction - A soft objective”            208

      Release and Sprint Planning............ 209

      Scrum Ceremonies............ 209

      The First Month............ 209

      Product Owner Change:............ 210

      Different Understanding of Agile and Scrum............ 210

      Building New Expectations............ 210

      Some Nice Surprise............ 211

      Agile Started to Scrumble:............ 212

      Back to Waterfall and Command and Control Management............ 212

      Lessons learned:............ 212

      20.            Bibliography            214

      21.            Index            215

      - - - - - - - - - - -

      On Sun, Nov 27, 2011 at 3:34 PM, Pablo Emanuel <pablo.emanuel@...> wrote:
       

      Dear all,

      I've just written a detailed case study on two very similar cases - whole-IT portfolio-level Kanban including SAP development - one of which was a huge and quick success, while the other is still struggling in the implementation. I think it may be valuable for people in a similar situation. Please feel free to ask questions or to give your feedback.

      http://mythicpraxis.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/kanban-a-success-story-and-a-humbling-experience/

      Best regards,
      Pablo




      On Mon, Nov 28, 2011 at 5:57 AM, Eb <amaeze@...> wrote:
       

      Pablo -

      Quite timely given my recent question on here about "people being committed yet the Kanban not succeeding" i.e. lessening the effect of the human equation on the change initiative.  It's probably to early to say that it's failed per se, but you've brought up some salient points especially around initial conditions and how challenging an evolutionary process can be.

      Thanks.

      Eb



      On 11/27/2011 04:34 PM, Pablo Emanuel wrote:
      Dear all,

      I've just written a detailed case study on two very similar cases - whole-IT portfolio-level Kanban including SAP development - one of which was a huge and quick success, while the other is still struggling in the implementation. I think it may be valuable for people in a similar situation. Please feel free to ask questions or to give your feedback.

      http://mythicpraxis.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/kanban-a-success-story-and-a-humbling-experience/

      Best regards,
      Pablo


      -- 
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