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37708Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Dedicate Tester in an Agile Team

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  • Adam Sroka
    Apr 17, 2009
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      On Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 12:05 AM, Jaideep Khanduja
      <jaideep.khanduja@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Adam wrote:
      >
      >>People with a background in testing definitely bring something unique to
      >> the table. At the very least they: a) are familiar with methods and tools
      >> for testing that aren't strictly related to TDD. b) have spent a lot of time
      >> thinking about how to break things and where things might be likely to
      >> break. c) understand how to think about and communicate about quality.
      >
      >
      >
      > But who says in TDD: a) is devoid of methods and tools for testing (are
      > there any standards about methods and tools that aren’t strictly related to
      > TDD, atleast I am not aware of!),

      I didn't say that (And you'll have to explain the parenthetical
      because it doesn't make sense to me.) TDD does have methods and tools.
      QA as a discipline includes all of the same methods and tools and
      quite a bit more.

      b) does it mean none of TDD team members
      > spend time thinking about how to break things and where things might be
      > likely to break,

      I didn't say that either. AFAIK, most developers devote at least a
      portion of their time to designing and writing code. Whereas testers
      devote themselves to testing.

      A successful janitor is good at mopping floors. Most developers are
      capable of mopping floors. There is value in hiring janitors. Your
      logic would suggest otherwise.

      c) again does it mean TDD team members do not understand
      > how to think about and communicate about quality.
      >

      They might not have devoted as much time or energy to it. They might
      not wish to.

      >
      >
      > I think, TDD is at par all these qualities and above that. (I might be
      > wrong!)
      >

      I think that you are wrong, but I would suggest that you research it
      for yourself. There is a large body of knowledge related to QA. Their
      are entire websites, conferences, academic courses (And at least a
      couple degree programs), a huge amount of literature, etc. I am
      convinced that some of this has value and is above and beyond what
      most developers (even those versed in TDD) are exposed to.
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