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Re: Opinions on Outdoor Training

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  • Ilively@adelphia.net
    ... Scouts or Webelos, whereas many other cooking methods are, but what is age appropriate for Tigers, Cubs or Webelos would probably bore Boy Scouts or
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2006
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      >I do not believe that Dutch Oven cooking is appropriate for Cub
      Scouts or Webelos, whereas many other cooking methods are, but what is age
      appropriate for Tigers, Cubs or Webelos would probably bore Boy Scouts or
      Venturing youth out of their minds!

      Repectfully, Pete, I do not believe the idea of teaching lots of cooking ideas in BALOO, or OWL is to teach leaders how to teach the Cub Scouts, but, instead, to teach leaders (themselves!) how to cook.

      Many of these leaders (especially those in BALOO) have little to no outdoor cooking experience. Depending on the level of camping, and the facilities available to them, many leaders may have NO CLUE how or what they can cook for campouts -- and the Cub Scouts could end up with Pop tarts, dry cereal and PB/J for the weekend. While the Cub Scouts might enjoy this fare, I doubt their parents would be screaming "let's go camping again" anytime soon after such a weekend.

      Something that we, as trainers, must remember is that we need to include a variety of foods/meals in our training. I've seen many trainings focus on lunch and dinner fare, and completely ignore the fact that most people like to eat Breakfast.

      As someone mentioned, it may be that Cub Scout Packs would cook as one large group, instead of individually or by family. I try to ensure that our people receive a "mass quantities" chart. Many people really don't know how much food/drink a group would need. [I'm struggling with this as I prepare for my son's Eagle Scout Court of Honor -- how much cake/drink do 200 people need?!]


      However, I do agree with you that some cooking methods are best taught at different levels. I imagine that Boy Scout Leaders wouldn't be as excited at a "Box Oven" demonstration, as the Cub Scout Leaders would. Nor would "eggs in a bag" (boiling water method) thrill the Scout Leaders. Something fun for Scout Leaders might be the eggs in a bag (brown bag/bacon) method, or cooking a hardboiled egg in a paper cup (leaders can explain the 'science' of water boiling at 212 and paper burning at 451 to the scouts). [Heck, *I* got excited about cooking burgers on a rock (when I took SMF). ]

      As for Venturing Leaders, I imagine that they'd gain from learning 'Trail Food' and 'backpacking cuisine'.


      Again, this is "opinions on outdoor training" ... your mileage may vary.
      ;-)



      Something we do in my Council is hold the outdoor trainings on the same weekend. We often share staff between the two courses. This has advantages and disadvantages. Our Scout Camp is inconvenient to all -- at least 1/2 hour drive for most. When leaders agree to the training, they often ask if they can teach more than one session in order to justify their trip. Why can't the knots expert teach knots to both Webelo Leaders and Scoutmasters?

      We sometimes share courses, too. Our BALOO and OWL participants have shared the cooking demonstration, as long as BALOO has been around. [Buying in bulk has its advantages, too!]

      BALOO and OWL also share the gear demonstration. [We've rearranged the BSA suggested schedule to allow this] Generally, we ask our local outdoor store to come out and show their wares. THEY are the experts. We've been lucky, and the demonstrators often give samples to participants (socks, led flashlights, fuel containers, caribiners, freeze-dried food, etc.)

      The Values/Goals session is shared by the OWL and IOLS leaders. It's the 'difficult talk' about things like sex, drugs and alcohol. We generally hold it after our Saturday evening meal -- when people are happy and full, and (sadly) most likely to fall asleep.

      OWL and IOLS also share campfire. It's a great opportunity for the Webelos Leaders to get to know the Scoutmasters that they may be visiting with their Den.


      Best,
      Ida
    • Scouter Chuck
      Ida Lively wrote... ... Agreed. [snip] ... Also, kids on stimulant meds _require_ a high protien breakfast. As do many special needs diets. ... Actually, in
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1, 2006
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        Ida Lively wrote...

        > Repectfully, Pete, I do not believe the idea of teaching lots
        > of cooking ideas in BALOO, or OWL is to teach leaders how to
        > teach the Cub Scouts, but, instead, to teach leaders
        > (themselves!) how to cook.

        Agreed.

        [snip]
        > Something that we, as trainers, must remember is that we need
        > to include a variety of foods/meals in our training. I've seen
        > many trainings focus on lunch and dinner fare, and completely
        > ignore the fact that most people like to eat Breakfast.

        Also, kids on stimulant meds _require_ a high protien breakfast.
        As do many special needs diets.

        > However, I do agree with you that some cooking methods are best
        > taught at different levels. I imagine that Boy Scout Leaders
        > wouldn't be as excited at a "Box Oven" demonstration, as the
        > Cub Scout Leaders would.

        Actually, in the Troop I used to work with was a fellow who used
        the cardboard box oven, and was constantly asked how he did it.

        [snip]
        > Something we do in my Council is hold the outdoor trainings on
        > the same weekend. We often share staff between the two
        > courses. This has advantages and disadvantages. Our Scout
        > Camp is inconvenient to all -- at least 1/2 hour drive for
        > most.

        That's the one in town, for us. It's at least a 2 hour drive to
        the other 3. The one 1/2 hour away is "close".

        > When leaders agree to the training, they often ask if they can
        > teach more than one session in order to justify their trip.

        Good idea.

        > Why can't the knots expert teach knots to both Webelo Leaders
        > and Scoutmasters?

        Because he gets carried away by demo-ing his knowledge, and
        begins to "snow" everyone. ;) Seriously, that was one of my
        problems, remembering the skill level of the boys and leaders.
        Those who don't know how to tie a square knot or bowline are
        going to have a lot of difficulty with the masthead knot.

        > We sometimes share courses, too. Our BALOO and OWL
        > participants have shared the cooking demonstration, as long as
        > BALOO has been around. [Buying in bulk has its advantages,
        > too!]

        That's also one of the few demonstrations that actually _can_ be
        easily shared.

        [snip rest]

        YiS,

        Chuck Bramlet -- Phoenix, Az. ----- mailto:antelope95@...
        I "used to be" an Antelope! -- WEM-10-95
        Thunderbird District -- Grand Canyon Council
        District Committee Member at Large
        -------------------------------------------------------------------
        "The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing"
        -- Stephen R. Covey
        -------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Dave Loomis
        I don t know. I was taught cardboard box oven cooking at a Show-an-Do by an older gentleman had his Cub aged grandson. I suppose the boy won t have much to
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1, 2006
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          I don't know. I was taught cardboard box oven cooking at a Show-an-Do
          by an older gentleman had his Cub aged grandson. I suppose the boy
          won't have much to look forward to in Boy Scout cooking, but he sure had
          a great time telling us how the two of them cooked a cake from mix,
          Cornish Game Hens, and a pineapple upside down cake in their oven.

          Dave


          Scouter Chuck wrote:
          > Ida Lively wrote...
          >
          >> Repectfully, Pete, I do not believe the idea of teaching lots
          >> of cooking ideas in BALOO, or OWL is to teach leaders how to
          >> teach the Cub Scouts, but, instead, to teach leaders
          >> (themselves!) how to cook.
          >
          > Agreed.
          >
          > [SNIP]
          >>
          >
          >> However, I do agree with you that some cooking methods are best
          >> taught at different levels. I imagine that Boy Scout Leaders
          >> wouldn't be as excited at a "Box Oven" demonstration, as the
          >> Cub Scout Leaders would.
          >
          > Actually, in the Troop I used to work with was a fellow who used
          > the cardboard box oven, and was constantly asked how he did it.
          >
          > [snip rest]
          >
          > YiS,
          >
          > Chuck Bramlet -- Phoenix, Az.


          Dave Loomis mailto:dloomis.nh.ultranet@...
          245 Union St., #4 (603) 431 5342
          Portsmouth, NH 0301-4349
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