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  • Robert
    I have decided in the wake of all of the injuries and deaths associated in scouting lately, that I would like to put together some good training to refresh
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 11, 2005
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      I have decided in the wake of all of the injuries and deaths
      associated in scouting lately, that I would like to put together some
      good training to refresh everyone on heat, and cold weather related
      injuries and other saftey related training. What I am looking for is
      any thing already done, as I don't want to reinvent the wheel. Do any
      of you have this, or can you point me in the right direction. You can
      send me a PM or reply here. Thanks in advance.

      Robert L. DeWitt
      ASM Troop 12
      Chickasaw District
      Georgia Carolina Council
      Augusta, Ga
      I used to be a good Ole Bear SR-691
    • Scouter Chuck
      Robert asked... ... Time to plug one of my favorite resources: Macscouter Look on the Macscouter page (http://www.macscouter.com), for the survival and
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 11, 2005
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        Robert asked...

        > I have decided in the wake of all of the injuries and deaths
        > associated in scouting lately, that I would like to put together some
        > good training to refresh everyone on heat, and cold weather related
        > injuries and other saftey related training. What I am looking for is
        > any thing already done, as I don't want to reinvent the wheel. Do any
        > of you have this, or can you point me in the right direction. You can
        > send me a PM or reply here. Thanks in advance.

        Time to plug one of my favorite resources: Macscouter
        Look on the Macscouter page (http://www.macscouter.com), for the
        survival and hypothermia files. Here's the direct URL.

        http://www.macscouter.com/KeepWarm/index.html

        Some of the info there might be a little dated, but it's pretty
        good info, IMHO.

        YiS,

        Chuck Bramlet -- Phoenix, Az. ----- mailto:antelope95@...
        I "used to be" an Antelope! -- WEM-10-95
        Thunderbird District -- Grand Canyon Council
        District Committee Member at Large
        -------------------------------------------------------------------
        "The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing"
        -- Stephen R. Covey
        -------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Chad C. Cooper
        Robert, I passed along your inquiry to a fellow Scouter and health professional on the Scouts-L listserv. She gave me back the following suggestions as a
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 12, 2005
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          Robert,

          I passed along your inquiry to a fellow Scouter and health professional
          on the Scouts-L listserv. She gave me back the following suggestions
          as a starting point:

          Management of Heatstroke and Heat Exhaustion - June 1, 2005 - American
          Family Physician <http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050601/2133.html>
          http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050601/2133.html

          Heat Index <http://www.crh.noaa.gov/pub/heat.php>
          http://www.crh.noaa.gov/pub/heat.php

          Fort Bragg, North Carolina: Heat Index
          <http://www.us.sensornet.gov/ftbragg-heatindex/>
          http://www.us.sensornet.gov/ftbragg-heatindex/

          - Chad
          Troop 293, Chief Black Dog, Northern Star Council
          Apple Valley, MN

          Robert wrote:

          > I have decided in the wake of all of the injuries and deaths
          > associated in scouting lately, that I would like to put together some
          > good training to refresh everyone on heat, and cold weather related
          > injuries and other saftey related training. What I am looking for is
          > any thing already done, as I don't want to reinvent the wheel. Do any
          > of you have this, or can you point me in the right direction. You can
          > send me a PM or reply here. Thanks in advance.
          >
          > Robert L. DeWitt
          > ASM Troop 12
          > Chickasaw District
          > Georgia Carolina Council
          > Augusta, Ga
          > I used to be a good Ole Bear SR-691
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > For subscription and delevery options send a message to:
          > scouter_t-help@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Scouting The Net - http://www.ScoutingTheNet.com/
          >
          >
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          > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • R Fisher
          ... You might also check out the Princeton University Outdoor Action Program website. They have quite a bit of information on taking care of yourself outdoors
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 12, 2005
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            > I have decided in the wake of all of the injuries and deaths
            > associated in scouting lately, that I would like to put together some
            > good training to refresh everyone on heat, and cold weather related
            > injuries and other saftey related training.

            You might also check out the Princeton University Outdoor Action Program
            website. They have quite a bit of information on taking care of
            yourself outdoors and safety management, at
            http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/safety/safeman.shtml. They also have
            detailed information on specific areas as well. For example, there page
            on hypothermia and cold injuries
            http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/safety/hypocold.shtml (may wrap, it's a
            longish link) has a good deal of information on the causes, symptoms,
            treatment and prevention of hypothermia and cold injuries. More
            information on hypothermia as well as heat related injuries and other
            safety issues can be found at
            http://www.outdoorplaces.com/Features/Hiking/

            The National Weather Service has a great deal of information related to
            lightning avoidance and treatment.
            http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/overview.htm and
            http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/outdoors.htm

            The most important piece of safety equipment is something that everyone
            has but often isn't used, and that is their brain and good judgement.
            Education is the key, but sometimes "testosterone poisoning" can
            override education, and sometimes with very undesirable consequences.

            Good Luck

            Roy Fisher
          • bill smith
            You might want to include the dangers of low level dams and weirs that are commonly built on rivers across the country. These often create hydraulics that trap
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 12, 2005
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              You might want to include the dangers of low level dams and weirs
              that are commonly built on rivers across the country. These often
              create hydraulics that trap unwary swimmers, conoists and rafters
              and are often referred to as "drowning machines.

              An excellent diagram of a drowning machine:
              http://www.boatingsidekicks.com/kidsknow/INWATER/lowdiagram.htm

              Details of the dangers:
              http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/education_safety/safety/boatwater/drowningmachine.pdf

              An attempt to rescue:
              http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/national/2005/08/02/girl-missing050802.html

              An engineering study:
              http://www.wrightwater.com/wwe/wwepubs/pdfs/Low-Head%20Dams%202-2004.pdf

              US Army Corps of Engineers has the following warning:
              THE DROWNING MACHINE
              The navigation dams appear to be tranquil sites on the Illinois River.
              However, anyone who gets too close to the dam will be drawn into the
              "Drowning Machine." As the main current goes through the dam down to the
              bottom of the river it re-circulates back upstream to create a backwash,
              known as the "Hydraulic Effect." Anyone who gets into this area has
              little chance of survival. The propeller of a boat is ineffective in
              this area, because it can't "bite" into the foamy water. To avoid
              getting caught in the hydraulic, boats must stay at least 400 feet away
              from the downstream side of the dam, and 600 feet away from the upstream
              side of the dam.

              The band Tourniquet has an graphic song about the subject.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Scouter Chuck
              Chad C. Cooper wrote... ... Could I suggest that anyone who has links like this forward them to the MacScouter folks? (Gary and Kyna Hendra) These links would
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 12, 2005
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                Chad C. Cooper wrote...

                > I passed along your inquiry to a fellow Scouter and health professional
                > on the Scouts-L listserv. She gave me back the following suggestions
                > as a starting point:

                Could I suggest that anyone who has links like this forward them to
                the MacScouter folks? (Gary and Kyna Hendra)

                These links would be invaluable to keep their pages current on both
                hypothermia and heat related problems.

                Not to mention the general safety issues that I saw posted.

                Just a thought...

                YiS,

                Chuck Bramlet -- Phoenix, Az. ----- mailto:antelope95@...
                I "used to be" an Antelope! -- WEM-10-95
                Thunderbird District -- Grand Canyon Council
                District Committee Member at Large
                -------------------------------------------------------------------
                "The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing"
                -- Stephen R. Covey
                -------------------------------------------------------------------
              • Wendell Brown
                ... Errr... I kinda took your idea and ran with it Chuck --- I created a wiki page on ScoutingTheNet that has the links provided so far.
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 15, 2005
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                  Scouter Chuck wrote:

                  > Could I suggest that anyone who has links like this forward them to
                  > the MacScouter folks? (Gary and Kyna Hendra)

                  Errr... I kinda took your idea and ran with it Chuck --- I created a
                  wiki page on ScoutingTheNet that has the links provided so far.

                  http://www.scoutingthenet.com/wiki/index.php/Main/SafetyRoundtable

                  For those of you who do not know what a wiki is, it's a user editable
                  web site. Basically, if you want to add a link (or a page or whatever),
                  you simply edit the page an add it. If you see something that is
                  inappropriate, delete it.

                  Anyway, I've added a basic page and a couple of sub-pages. Feel free to
                  add to it or improve it any way you want to (yes, you can even create
                  whole new sections - knock your selves out). Have fun! :)

                  I hope you find this useful.
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