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Reading is not training

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  • Herb Dulzo
    I am working on Woodbadge staff development for the first time. Couldn t help but make an overhead with the Dilbert powerpoint poisoning cartoon for my
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 19, 2004
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      I am working on Woodbadge staff development for the first time. Couldn't
      help but make an overhead with the Dilbert "powerpoint poisoning" cartoon
      for my first presentation.

      Herb Dulzo

      ATTENTION YOUNG ADULTS AND TEENAGERS!!
      If you are tired of being hasseled by unreasonable parents...NOW IS THE TIME
      FOR ACTION! Move out and pay your own way while you still know everything!!
      Going to the Boy Scout National Jamboree in 2005!
    • Michael Brown
      ... that the ... same way that ... You d no luddite. :) I work in the IT field, and so have had various experiences with on- line training. When I worked on
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 22, 2004
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        --- In scouter_t@yahoogroups.com, wahowland@a... wrote:
        > OK, I'll stick my neck out on this one and say that I don't think
        that the
        > online "training" is so hot either. On-line isn't training in the
        same way that
        > reading isn't.

        You'd no luddite. :)

        I work in the IT field, and so have had various experiences with on-
        line training. When I worked on my second master's degree, most of
        my courses were done on-line and my experiences with them ran the
        gamut of being as good as in-person training to litte better then
        reading a book and sending in assignments. So my only caution is to
        not lump in ALL on-line training as the same.

        The on-line training for YPT is one type, were you read stuff on the
        screen, watch videos, and then do some simple tasks to
        somehow 'prove' you did the training. But there is little or no
        interaction with a trainer to be sure you really understood the
        material (which regardless if you use videos/ppt, is the REAL
        value/power of having a GOOD trainer deliver training). That's why I
        and many of my co-workers dislike this kind of training.

        I have had on-line training in which there was a real
        trainer 'delivering' the training (using PPT type thing) in real
        time, which meant there was a means for interaction with the trainer
        and other participants. These sorts of on-line training was pretty
        good, but it loses the other advantages of on-line training of being
        able to take it when YOU want, rather then taking it at a set time.

        There is nothing wrong with the proper use of PPT/videos. A trainer
        need to know the material and be able to ADD to it from their own
        knowledge and experiences, and be able to re-explain it for the
        audience to be sure they do understand it. This, as I noted, is the
        advantage of having a real trainer give training, rather then watch a
        tape, read a book, etc.

        Michael Brown
      • Dan Kurtenbach
        It is interesting that most of the comments on this thread measure good training not by ojective standards applicable to the trainer (does she speak clearly,
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 23, 2004
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          It is interesting that most of the comments on this thread measure good
          training not by ojective standards applicable to the trainer (does she speak
          clearly, vary the pace and/or methods of presentation, repeat important
          points, etc.), but by subjective standards applicable to the students (Would
          they want to come back to training? Were they entertained? Did they look
          like they learned something?).

          Nor was the material itself really mentioned. Remember back in the Watergate
          era, when the Nixon tapes were released? Some network -- perhaps it was PBS
          -- televised speakers just reading the transcripts in monotone. Yet the
          content made it interesting (and entertaining). On the other hand, even if
          it was Auntie Beans teaching calculus, I don't think I'd get much out of the
          course because of the content.

          I guess my view of it is that the quality of training has three main
          components. The first is the content, the actual material being presented
          -- is it selected and arranged to meet the goals of the training? Is it too
          much, too little, too complex, too basic? Do the various sections build on
          each other, or are they arranged haphazardly? The second component is the
          presentation -- is the method of presentation (live trainer, video,
          computer, audiotape, reading material) selected to meet the goals of the
          training? Is the method of presentation appropriate for the material?
          Appropriate for the audience? Are the location, time, and facilities
          appropriate for the material and comfortable and convenient for the
          audience? Is the method of presentation audience-friendly? (That is, is
          the live presenter skilled? Is the typeface large enough on the handouts?
          Are the computer directions easy to follow?) The third component is an
          objective measurement of learning -- did the participants actually learn
          what they were supposed to learn? Were the goals of the training met? Have
          they put the training to use? Do they remember what they learned six months
          later? Two years later?

          Dan Kurtenbach
          Fairfax, VA

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        • tsbeb@att.net
          This past weekend I attended a conference and some training. One presenter did read mostly from the syllabus. But he did it in a manner that if you were not
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 23, 2004
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            This past weekend I attended a conference and some training. One presenter did read mostly from the syllabus. But he did it in a manner that if you were not looking at him, and most of the time you were looking at a power point, you did not know that he was reading.

            It was his first time presenting this leadership workshop. He did a fine job speaking. Actually it was his first time teaching any training program.

            Ted Beblowski
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