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Re: [Scouter_T] District Cub Scout Training Chairman Question

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  • Judy Yeager
    Jon - In our District, we have a District Training Chair who recruits Training Coordinators for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venturing and Varsity. Those people
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 4, 2001
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      Jon -

      In our District, we have a District Training Chair who recruits Training
      Coordinators for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venturing and Varsity. Those
      people work with the District Training Chair and act either as Course
      Director for the training or recruit another trainer to fulfill that
      position. The Coordinator will either be responsible for the following or
      work with the Course Director to see that these responsibilites are met:

      1. Recruit team(s) to facilitate the training event(s).
      2. Provide materials and guidance to members of the team.
      3. Make presentation assignments to members of the team.
      4. Determine equipment needs and see that the equipment is at the
      training.
      5. Secure a location for the event(s).
      6. Promote the event(s).
      7. Oversee pre-registration for the event(s).
      8. Oversee the training event(s).
      9. Complete the training attendance report and see that it is filed.
      10. Work witht the District Training Chair to formulate a budget prior
      to the course and finalize the budget when the course is completed.

      > 1. What does the time commitment involve in this position?

      The time commitment is dependent upon two things: the number and frequency
      of events assigned to you and how much you delegate to others.

      > 2. Who, if anyone do you have reporting to you? In other
      > words, do you have someone who is responsible for Youth
      > Protection training, Basic Leader Training, BALOO and
      > WLOT? Do you have an assistant?

      In our area, sometimes the Cub Coordinator handles the outdoor training and
      sometimes the District Training Chair handles that. Youth Protection is the
      responsibility of the District Training Chair.

      > 3. What are some of the problems one would run into in this
      > position? Is getting volunteers an issue?

      Recruiting is almost always difficult. Most Districts have a core of
      experience trainers who are dedicated to the program, but it is not wise to
      just rely on this group. You should continually be searching out new folks
      to get involved - the future of your program and District depends on it.

      > 4. How much of the job involves paperwork which needs to be
      > turned into council?

      As District Training Chair, I work with the Coordinators to see that all
      necessary paperwork is completed, but the buck stops with me. In our area,
      paperwork for the courses that you outlined would include preliminary
      budgets, promotional materials, registration reports, training attendance
      reports, and final budgets, complete with receipts for all disbursements.

      > 5. What meetings do you have to attend on the district/council
      > level?

      My Coordinators schedule meetings with their team(s) as necessary and are
      invited but not required to attend District Committee Meetings.

      > 6. Who do you report to in your district/council and what
      > level of support do you get from them?

      My Coordinators report to me and I report to the DE of my District. Our DE
      is very supportive.

      > I realize that different councils and districts may be set up
      > differently, but I'm looking for what should be done in this
      > position as much as what has been done. Any help would be greatly
      > appreciated.

      The way we organize training has worked well for us.

      Judy Yeager
      District Training Chair
      Northern Tier District, HOAC
    • Joe Kovacs
      Hello list, ... Recruiting is almost always difficult. Most Districts have a core of experience trainers who are dedicated to the program, but it is not wise
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 4, 2001
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        Hello list,

        > 3. What are some of the problems one would run into in this
        > position? Is getting volunteers an issue?

        Recruiting is almost always difficult. Most Districts have a core of
        experience trainers who are dedicated to the program, but it is not wise to
        just rely on this group. You should continually be searching out new folks
        to get involved - the future of your program and District depends on it.

        The one thing we did at our Council Training meeting last year was to set a
        goal to recruit and increase our District training staff by 10% each year.
        By setting a goal we were forced to find new people. Ten percent only comes
        out only 2-3 people.
        I would only let them do only 1 or 2 presentations on there first course.
        This would let them get through some of their nervousness and to work on
        their skills. As their confidence grows, they can take more
        responsibilities.
        Just think, after 3or 4 years this person could by your next course
        director!
        The easest way I found to recruite new, good trainers is to talk to the
        course director of the Woodbadge Training in your area. They are the best
        soure of poeple that "get it".

        Joe Kovacs
        e-mail buckey@...
        AIM station37joe
        Pocono District Training Coordinator
        Minsi Trails Council
      • Dave Loomis
        Like any job, the amount of time required and your responsibilities will vary by location, and how much your superiors want/allow you to do. If your area is
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 4, 2001
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          Like any job, the amount of time required and your responsibilities will
          vary by location, and how much your superiors want/allow you to do. If your
          area is set up in the standard BSA model, you will report to the District
          Training Chair, who is in turn, responsible to the Program Chair and the
          Council Training Chair. Other models have 3-4 separate training chairs who
          report to the Program Chair and the Council Training Chair.

          In any case, you are responsible for gathering and training your training
          team, deciding what training is required and in what quantities, and managing
          its accomplishment. If you have a large district you may have separate teams
          for each area of responsibility, smaller districts may have one team that
          does everything. If you need to recruit additional trainers, silly proviso -
          you ALWAYS need to recruit new trainers, try to get your Commissioners on
          board as trainers. This keeps them up to speed with the changing program,
          introduces them to the new scouters in the district in a nonjudgmental
          situation and gives them validity as an expert in the field of Scouting.

          "Jon T. Patten" wrote:

          > Hi Folks,
          > I've just been asked by my DE to be the district cub scout training
          > chair. Trying to find some background on the job before I say yes or
          > no. Could you answer the following questions?
          >
          > 1. What does the time commitment involve in this position?
          >

          How long is a piece of string? See above. It will be less time
          consuming if you are moving into an established position with a training team
          in place; longer if you have to reinvent the program.

          >
          > 2. Who, if anyone do you have reporting to you? In other
          > words, do you have someone who is responsible for Youth
          > Protection training, Basic Leader Training, BALOO and
          > WLOT? Do you have an assistant?
          >

          Depends on the size of the district and your preferences and style of
          leadership. Larger districts will need more delegation of training, perhaps
          into specialized teams, perhaps into geographically separated, more
          generalized teams. Remember, you can delegate your authority to train
          leaders, but not your responsibility to produce trained leaders, it all comes
          back to you. If you can split up parts of the job between you and another
          person who can support your efforts, AND the job requires it due to numerical
          or physical size of the district, go for it. Recruit or promote an
          assistant, he or she can make your job much easier. Appointing specific
          folks to head teams devoted to one or more courses can also make your job
          easier, or drive you crazy trying to coordinate their efforts.

          >
          > 3. What are some of the problems one would run into in this
          > position? Is getting volunteers an issue?
          >

          Getting leaders to training, and volunteers to train them. Finding
          venues in which to run courses. Promoting supplies and equipment, especially
          current BSA booklets to provide the learners with current information.

          >
          > 4. How much of the job involves paperwork which needs to be
          > turned into council?
          >

          Unless all training records are kept in the district only, you will need
          to turn lists of newly trained leaders into your council office, as well as
          keep copies yourself - things DO get lost. You should be signing off on all
          applications for training awards, since you are the point of contact as to
          who is trained.

          You will also have to submit budgets for each training course, in a
          format approved by council, to receive up-front funding to run courses. Most
          councils require training to be self sustaining, or even turn a small profit
          over to the council to help fund other less stand-alone programs.
          Determining the cost of each course, and what needs to be purchased out of
          the proceeds from the course will be your responsibility. Copies and
          transparencies cost money, although transparencies should be an infrequent
          need. These expenses usually must be paid out before the learners pay their
          registration fee, so you need the front money from council to get your course
          going. Council will also have to provide any BSA materials required for the
          course, either from the Scout Store, or by ordering from National. You CAN
          order directly from the NSS, but you won't get the council's 60% of list
          price cost for materials and you will have to pay postage out of your
          budget. You will also find it more difficult to order bin items directly,
          and councils normally order these items to discourage waste of these no-cost
          items.


          >
          > 5. What meetings do you have to attend on the district/council
          > level?
          >

          If you are the Cub Training Chair, responsible to the District Program
          Chair you will need to attend most of the district committee meetings, and
          the council committee meeting as well. If you are responsible to the
          District Training Chair you two will have to meet to get the inputs for
          district and council meetings.

          >
          > 6. Who do you report to in your district/council and what
          > level of support do you get from them?
          >

          I report to my District Program Chair and Council Training Chair and get
          lots of moral support and guidance from them. I work closely with the other
          District and Council Program Training Chairs to provide a quality program to
          the learners.

          >
          > I realize that different councils and districts may be set up
          > differently, but I'm looking for what should be done in this
          > position as much as what has been done. Any help would be greatly
          > appreciated.
          >
          >

          Your prime responsibilities are to provide the learners with necessary
          training based on current materials, determining training needs, recruiting,
          motivating, and training volunteers to provide this training, and recording
          the results so a coherent record exists of the training accomplished. How
          you do all this will vary determining to your council and district's wiring
          guide, your abilities, and the team you have chosen

          Dave
          Council Venturing Training CHair
          DIstrict BS Training Chair


          > Thanks,
          > Jon Patten
          > Cubmaster Pack 74
          > Pine Tree Council
          >
          > For subscription and delevery options send a message to:
          > scouter_t-help@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Scouting The Net - http://www.arkie.net/scouting/
          >
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          --
          To reply, click on the mailto: address below.

          Dave Loomis mailto:dloomis@...
          1094 Woodbury Ave. (603) 431 5342
          Portsmouth, NH 03801-3225
        • David Gross
          ... training ... This is one of my scouting roles, which I am in the process of recruiting a replacement. So, I d love to answer :-) ... This of course varies
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 5, 2001
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            --- In scouter_t@y..., "Jon T. Patten" <jpatten1@m...> wrote:
            > Hi Folks,
            > I've just been asked by my DE to be the district cub scout
            training
            > chair. Trying to find some background on the job before I say yes or
            > no. Could you answer the following questions?

            This is one of my scouting roles, which I am in the process of
            recruiting a replacement. So, I'd love to answer :-)
            >
            > 1. What does the time commitment involve in this position?
            >
            This of course varies with your district's training plan, and your
            participation in it. I committed to organize 3 NLEs, 3 Cub Leader
            Training, 1 BALOO, and 1 WLOT this year. I choose to be on staff for
            as many of these as my schedule permits, but the training goes on if I
            am unavailable. I also staffed Boy Scout Leader training (my "base"
            Scouting role is SA). Over and above actually staffing the course, I
            spend around 4 hours preparing each course (BALOO was more, because it
            was new). Much of that time is recruiting new trainers (see next).

            > 2. Who, if anyone do you have reporting to you? In other
            > words, do you have someone who is responsible for Youth
            > Protection training, Basic Leader Training, BALOO and
            > WLOT? Do you have an assistant?
            >
            About the only thing I'd claim to have improved in district is the
            number of qualified and participating Cub Trainers, and I think this
            is essential to success in any trainer chair role. For Cub trainer, I
            have two complete teams (a Blue team, and a Gold team, just like the
            US Navy & Crews), which reduces the load on everyone. I have 10
            participating Cub trainers right now.

            Since another one of my roles is as CS RTC, I started with my RT
            Staff. I told each as I recruited them that I expected that they
            would staff at least one Cub Leader Training, at their choice. The
            other source I use is the Unit Commissioner's assigned to packs. I
            think serving on training staff is a big help to both RT staff & UCs
            in performing their roles.

            > 3. What are some of the problems one would run into in this
            > position? Is getting volunteers an issue?
            >
            Yep, just like any other Scouting role. I think Scouters who desire &
            are able to help Scouts INDIRECTLY (through helping other Scouters)
            are rare, so I tend to treat them "special", trying to make my
            expectations clear, and makign sure no one person is overloaded. I
            have refused some persons help who were already overloaded, and those
            folks will now do anything I ask. You certainly will need to focus on
            recruiting trainers -- and not everyone who is willing makes a good
            trainer.

            > 4. How much of the job involves paperwork which needs to be
            > turned into council?
            >
            Not much around here, other than the "trained" cards and trainign
            rosters that go to council.

            > 5. What meetings do you have to attend on the district/council
            > level?
            >
            I don't HAVE to attend any, our district training chair who I report
            to attends district committee and our council training events. We
            conduct a goodly amount of business (such as calendar planning) via
            e-mail. I do attend some district meetings (they are very nice to
            invite me), and I attend the obvious council levels events (new
            training roll out and Trainer Development Conference).

            > 6. Who do you report to in your district/council and what
            > level of support do you get from them?
            >
            I report to the Chair of our District Training Chair, who in turn
            reports to the District Chair. He backs me up completely, but is not
            quite as proactive as I'd like. He has another Scouter who has the
            same role I do for Boy Scout training. Right now, all Venturer
            training is out of district.

            All though you probably won't report to them, you need to consider
            your relationship with the CS RTC & the ADC for CS. These folks can
            be a big help or a big pain.

            Also given that the new WB course is more integrated program, you need
            to think and ask how expectations that may exist for the Cib Trainer
            with regard to WB (e.g., I'm on staff for our next council course).

            > Thanks,
            > Jon Patten

            I think this is a great role, if your interests lie in training, and
            if your interests lie in helping other Scouters (which I think is
            harder than helping Scouts). I certainly have found it very
            satisfying. Godspeed.

            YiS,

            David

            David Gross

            SA T-142, CS RTC, DTC, UC
            Eagle/3, AOL, OA/B
            "I used to be a fox, ..."
          • Hank Voegtle
            ... I can figure everything except Eagle/3? Whazzit?
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 5, 2001
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              At 11:45 PM 11/5/2001 +0000, you wrote:
              >SA T-142, CS RTC, DTC, UC
              >Eagle/3, AOL, OA/B
              >"I used to be a fox, ..."

              I can figure everything except Eagle/3? Whazzit?
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