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Youth Protection

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  • Michael Dotson
    We teach in YP that an adult is to never be alone with a youth. However, when, if ever, is it acceptable for an adult to drive a (single) scout to an event so
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 19, 2010
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      We teach in YP that an adult is to never be alone with a youth. However, when, if ever, is it acceptable for an adult to drive a (single) scout to an event so long as the adult has the permission of the scout's parents? Or what about an emergency? Related, is there an age limit, that is, what if the scout is 17 and the adult is 18?

      Michael


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ben Ward
      Yours in Scouting, Ben Ward Eagle Scout Class 1999 Heart of Virginia Council # 602 ... From: Michael Dotson Subject: [Scouter_T]
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 19, 2010
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        Yours in Scouting,


        Ben Ward



        Eagle Scout Class 1999
        Heart of Virginia Council # 602

        --- On Fri, 2/19/10, Michael Dotson <michaeldotson@...> wrote:


        From: Michael Dotson <michaeldotson@...>
        Subject: [Scouter_T] Youth Protection
        To: scouter_t@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, February 19, 2010, 4:33 PM


         



        We teach in YP that an adult is to never be alone with a youth. However, when, if ever, is it acceptable for an adult to drive a (single) scout to an event so long as the adult has the permission of the scout's parents? - Never always at least 2 or more youth when one adult is in the vehicle. Or what about an emergency? - Two deep leadership required.  Related, is there an age limit, that is, what if the scout is 17 and the adult is 18?  - They are consider youth 17 and adult for 18.

        Michael

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kevin Pate
        Parental permission not withstanding, adults are supposed to avoid one on one situations.  The BSA standard position is one which protects both the youth and
        Message 3 of 24 , Feb 19, 2010
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          Parental permission not withstanding, adults are supposed to avoid one on one situations.  The BSA standard position is one which protects both the youth and the adult.

          That said, if I was faced with the choice of driving a lad because he otherwise could not come, I'd first try to find a way to accomplish both goals, no one on one AND securing attendance.

          Best solution is arrange for someone transporting another scout or for two adults to pick him up.

          If that were not possible, and I'm certain some may gasp, I'd likely bite my lip and transport
          the lad rather than call him a cab.  Using a cab would still put him one on
          one, albeit with a total stranger.  I canna convince myself that is a
          better solution, and telling him sorry, you should of let us know earlier, but hey, we'll bring you back some pictures likewise is not the better course of action..

          But whadda I know.






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        • Staci Kilpatrick
          The few times I have been forced to take a child home from an event, I either ensure that there is another person (child or adult) in the car with me OR I put
          Message 4 of 24 , Feb 19, 2010
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            The few times I have been forced to take a child home from an event, I either ensure that there is another person (child or adult) in the car with me OR I put the single child on a cell phone call to their parent until I get there (this ensures that I have a short trip.




            ________________________________
            From: Kevin Pate <kevinpate@...>
            To: scouter_t@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, February 19, 2010 4:31:45 PM
            Subject: Re: [Scouter_T] Youth Protection

             
            Parental permission not withstanding, adults are supposed to avoid one on one situations.  The BSA standard position is one which protects both the youth and the adult.

            That said, if I was faced with the choice of driving a lad because he otherwise could not come, I'd first try to find a way to accomplish both goals, no one on one AND securing attendance.

            Best solution is arrange for someone transporting another scout or for two adults to pick him up.

            If that were not possible, and I'm certain some may gasp, I'd likely bite my lip and transport
            the lad rather than call him a cab.  Using a cab would still put him one on
            one, albeit with a total stranger.  I canna convince myself that is a
            better solution, and telling him sorry, you should of let us know earlier, but hey, we'll bring you back some pictures likewise is not the better course of action..

            But whadda I know.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Brian Duane
            As absurd as it may seem under some situations (friends for life, one now 18 and one just 16 or 17), the BSA standard is no one-on-one contact. So it seems
            Message 5 of 24 , Feb 20, 2010
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              As absurd as it may seem under some situations (friends for life, one now 18
              and one just 16 or 17), the BSA standard is no one-on-one contact. So it
              seems pretty clear that you would simply not be alone with a youth. This
              BSA standard is one that is designed to protect both the youth and the
              adult. That is the way I was trained, and the way I train others.



              I know that in a life or death emergency, I would drive anyone to the
              nearest hospital or whatever. But in an "emergency" of no viable
              transportation, I would find a way to include another adult or multiple
              youths into the situation.



              Yours in Scouting,



              Brian J. Duane

              Cubmaster - Pack 105, Pembroke MA

              Assistant Scoutmaster - Troop 43, Pembroke, MA

              District Activities Chairman - Cranberry Harbors, Old Colony Council

              District Training Team - Cranberry Harbors, Old Colony Council



              "...I'm going to work my ticket if I can" - Bobwhite NE-1-261



              "Never do for a Scout what he can do for himself."
              Robert Baden-Powell











              From: scouter_t@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scouter_t@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              Of Michael Dotson
              Sent: Friday, February 19, 2010 4:33 PM
              To: scouter_t@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Scouter_T] Youth Protection





              We teach in YP that an adult is to never be alone with a youth. However,
              when, if ever, is it acceptable for an adult to drive a (single) scout to an
              event so long as the adult has the permission of the scout's parents? Or
              what about an emergency? Related, is there an age limit, that is, what if
              the scout is 17 and the adult is 18?

              Michael

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • bnelson45
              Age limit is 18 for all programs but Venturing where the age limit is 21. An 18 year old is considered an adult in the Boy Scouting program, he cannot take a
              Message 6 of 24 , Mar 2, 2010
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                Age limit is 18 for all programs but Venturing where the age limit is 21.

                An 18 year old is considered an adult in the Boy Scouting program, he cannot take a 17 year Scout someplace alone.

                Two registered adult leaders, or one registered leader and a parent of a participating Scout or other adult, one of whom must be at least 21 years of age or older, are required for all trips or outings. There are a few instances, such as patrol activities, when no adult leadership is required. Coed overnight activities, even those including parent and child, require male and female adult leaders, both of whom must be 21 years of age or older, and one of whom must be a registered member of the BSA.

                You cannot transport someone else's kid alone in the car with you.

                In an emergency you try your best to follow the rules, but emergencies are emergencies.

                See the Guide to Safe Scouting:
                http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/HealthandSafety/GSS/gss01.aspx



                --- In scouter_t@yahoogroups.com, Michael Dotson <michaeldotson@...> wrote:
                >
                > We teach in YP that an adult is to never be alone with a youth. However, when, if ever, is it acceptable for an adult to drive a (single) scout to an event so long as the adult has the permission of the scout's parents? Or what about an emergency? Related, is there an age limit, that is, what if the scout is 17 and the adult is 18?
                >
                > Michael
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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