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RE: [scots-origins] Re: Auch-

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  • Andrew D Paterson
    Hi Peter, Auch - usually an anglicised version of Achadh - field Also Auchter - usually an anglicised version of Uachdar - top, upper part Both quoted from
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 14, 2009
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      Hi Peter,

      Auch - usually an anglicised version of Achadh - field

      Also

      Auchter - usually an anglicised version of Uachdar - top, upper part

      Both quoted from Place names on maps of Scotland & Wales - an Ordnance
      Survey publication.

      All the best,

      Andrew

      -----Original Message-----
      From: scots-origins@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scots-origins@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of hamishqueen
      Sent: 07 April 2009 16:47
      To: scots-origins@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [scots-origins] Re: Auch-


      --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, Peter Sandiford <PSandiford@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Who knows what Auch- means at the front of a Scottish placename?
      >




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    • David
      ... Found this.. hope the link works .. the meaning of Auchter as a prefix is on page 65. It looks like this book has it meaning an upland .
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 14, 2009
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        --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, "hamishqueen" <hamishqueen@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, Peter Sandiford <PSandiford@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Who knows what Auch- means at the front of a Scottish placename?
        > >
        >
        Found this.. hope the link works .. the meaning of Auchter as a prefix is on page 65. It looks like this book has it meaning an "upland".

        http://books.google.com/books?id=l7xEzPLlHZMC&pg=PA65&lpg=PA65&dq=scots+meaning+of+Auch+as+a+prefix&source=bl&ots=DO5EXUut7W&sig=z3MhxySr_E0GgLqjJD5h59AmaBE&hl=en&ei=pA7lSZLvB9LR-QaJsfyNCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1#PPA65,M1
      • Janet MacDonald
        Auch- is from the Gaelic achadh and means field. There are lots of Scottish place-names with this element; I recommend Bill Nicolaisen s Scottish Place-Names
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 15, 2009
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          Auch- is from the Gaelic 'achadh' and means field. There are lots of Scottish place-names with this element; I recommend Bill Nicolaisen's Scottish Place-Names for anyone with further interest,

          Janet

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ScotHeritage@aol.com
          In a message dated 4/14/2009 11:35:39 A.M. Central Daylight Time, ... I do, and I imagine every other Gael on the list does also. Hahahahaha One of the
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 15, 2009
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            In a message dated 4/14/2009 11:35:39 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
            hamishqueen@... writes:

            > Who knows what Auch- means at the front of a Scottish placename?
            >


            I do, and I imagine every other Gael on the list does also. Hahahahaha

            One of the reasons I got the strap every day of school, well at least the
            ones I attended.

            Auch means field. Note usually in the lowlands/south Ach in the North
            Ar. means high. ( important, well known, and such)

            Bal as in Balmoral Castle, bal/baile means a homestead/croft-ish
            Brae a a small hill
            Dal means a grassy area/meadow by a stream Like Dalrye where my uncle
            Alastair had a pub many years ago and his daughter, my cousin Mary, married
            Bianco who had a sweet and icecream shop on church st. Inverness.
            Inver/Inber the mouth or the Y of a river. Inber Ness Mouth of the River
            Ness.
            Drum a ridge like Drumnadrochit at the end of Loch Ness.
            Dun is a fort like in Dun/Din Eidyn not Dun Eden that city is in Florida
            America.
            Fin means Holy Loch Fin Holy loch.
            Kil a few priests, usually a monk house or house of monks. (Monastic)
            Kin head. Mull of Kintyre
            Kyle narrows as in the water narrows. Kyle of Loch Alsh
            Strath a wide valley like Strathpeffer
            Tilly a small hill

            OK here is the exam:

            Going by the names above:
            What does Ballachulish mean? ( Gaelic = Baile a chaolais )

            The field where the water narrows.
            Although there is a town there now called
            Ballachulish, Bal - ah - who - lish the original name was for Chaolas Mhic
            Phadraig, Patricks narrows.

            The name Ballachulish (in _Gaelic_
            (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Gaelic_language) , Baile a' chaolais) means "the Field by the Narrows". The
            _narrows_ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narrows) in question is _Caolas
            Mhic Phadraig_
            (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caolas_Mhic_Phadraig&action=edit&redlink=1) - Peter or Patrick's narrows, at the mouth of Loch
            Leven.

            I am sure there are many I could not think of but that should give you a
            bit of a start. Oh and its Gaaah Lic no thon harsh Gay Lick.

            Hope this helps you a wee bit
            Dave







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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • William K. Kelley
            Since Clack is incorporated in several place names, i.e.Clackmannan, Clackmannanshire and some other places in Scotland,does anyone have a clue as to the
            Message 5 of 9 , May 11, 2009
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              Since Clack is incorporated in several place names, i.e.Clackmannan, Clackmannanshire and some other places in Scotland,does anyone have a clue as to the meaning or origin of the name?
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