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Re: [scots-origins] Gaelic

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  • ScotHeritage@aol.com
    In a message dated 6/30/2005 6:49:51 A.M. Central Standard Time, mmeadows@webtv.net writes: Hi: I recently heard, (maybe this is Gaelic) it sounded like, Usa
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 30, 2005
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      In a message dated 6/30/2005 6:49:51 A.M. Central Standard Time,
      mmeadows@... writes:

      Hi:

      I recently heard, (maybe this is Gaelic)
      it sounded like, Usa Begga, or Osa Begg?
      Can someone help? Is this the name of
      an Island?

      Thanks.
      Miriam




      What you see as Usa is perhaps a form of Orsa/ors which is a dialetual (made
      that word up) for the Gaelic term arsa sort of said ean qwit Arsa as with
      most Gaelic words is a conceptual word who's meaning may change depending on
      context.
      Begg means small and Usa beg would mean perhaps sickly small or as one would
      say in the English Puny. so a small island called Cat Island may be
      referred to as that puny wee Island called cat. (PHONETIC) Ish na arsa Eelun Kat
      Hope that helps.
      Dave
      PS only about 4 weeks until TVScots will be available on North American TV
      sets.


      (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CleanWebGroup/)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • mmeadows@webtv.net
      Andrew: Thanks for your reply. I do not recall anything other than hearing it. I have been searching the internet for place names and concentrating on
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 30, 2005
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        Andrew: Thanks for your reply. I do not
        recall anything other than hearing it. I
        have been searching the internet for place
        names and concentrating on Scotland. I
        was wondering if I perhaps heard it when
        we were in Scotland. Thanks to you and
        all the others who replied to this very vague question.

        Sincerely,
        Miriam



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wally & alison Fraser
        Though I would not insult the Scots by trying to spell it, I suspect what you heard was the gaelic for water of life or the national dram. Whisky so truely
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 4, 2005
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          Though I would not insult the Scots by trying to spell it, I suspect what
          you heard was the gaelic for "water of life" or the national dram. Whisky
          so truely the water of life.

          AF}(NZ)
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <ScotHeritage@...>
          To: <scots-origins@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, July 01, 2005 6:06 AM
          Subject: Re: [scots-origins] Gaelic


          >
          >
          > In a message dated 6/30/2005 6:49:51 A.M. Central Standard Time,
          > mmeadows@... writes:
          >
          > Hi:
          >
          > I recently heard, (maybe this is Gaelic)
          > it sounded like, Usa Begga, or Osa Begg?
          > Can someone help? Is this the name of
          > an Island?
          >
          > Thanks.
          > Miriam
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > What you see as Usa is perhaps a form of Orsa/ors which is a dialetual
          > (made
          > that word up) for the Gaelic term arsa sort of said ean qwit Arsa as with
          > most Gaelic words is a conceptual word who's meaning may change depending
          > on
          > context.
          > Begg means small and Usa beg would mean perhaps sickly small or as one
          > would
          > say in the English Puny. so a small island called Cat Island may be
          > referred to as that puny wee Island called cat. (PHONETIC) Ish na arsa
          > Eelun Kat
          > Hope that helps.
          > Dave
          > PS only about 4 weeks until TVScots will be available on North American TV
          > sets.
          >
          >
          > (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CleanWebGroup/)
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > -------------------------------------------------------
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        • mmeadows@webtv.net
          Thanks everyone for all your helpful comments. Miriam [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 5, 2005
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            Thanks everyone for all your helpful comments.
            Miriam



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • ScotHeritage@aol.com
            In a message dated 7/5/2005 5:42:03 A.M. Central Standard Time, wafan@paradise.net.nz writes: Let me assure you sir or madam there is not insult or slight ever
            Message 5 of 21 , Jul 6, 2005
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              In a message dated 7/5/2005 5:42:03 A.M. Central Standard Time,
              wafan@... writes:

              Let me assure you sir or madam there is not insult or slight ever taken by
              one who tries to speak or write the Gaelic uisge-beatha (being very dyslexic I
              had to look up the spelling to insure it was correct) it is pronounced, more
              or less Eee sh kah va

              One of my uncles made the best in all the Gaidhhealtachd (Gael Tech) For
              many years the Inland Revenue attempted to seek out his wee pot of gold, but all
              to no avail. Then one Sabbath afternoon, he went down to check his stock and
              possibly get a wee dram and there was a loud boom and the largest blue flame
              I have ever seen in my life and the still was gone. Many said it was the lord
              punishing him, and for that matter the whole community/village for his
              indulgences on the Sunday. In those days you did not draw water from the well,
              cook a meal, plow a field or any type of work from Saturday midnight to Sunday
              Midnight. All work and preparation was done on the Saturday evening. The
              Sunday was spent reading the Bible, in quiet talk, or just sitting by the fire or
              outside with your pipe. The wee ones constantly heard " Wh ee shT a veel "
              be quiet or quiet down.
              Cheers
              Dave


              Though I would not insult the Scots by trying to spell it, I suspect what
              you heard was the Gaelic for "water of life" or the national dram. Whisky
              so truely the water of life.





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