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Re: Re: [scots-origins] Sharing Observations.

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  • Robert Worden
    I have also encounted the son of saga where the son of someone could be Mac--- or Mc---, ---ing (England), ---son (England), ap --- or verch --- (son or
    Message 1 of 61 , Apr 28, 2005
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      I have also encounted the "son of" saga where the son of someone could be Mac--- or Mc---, ---ing (England), ---son (England), ap --- or verch --- (son or daughter in Wales), ---son or ---dattir (Norway), ---sky (Poland) and of course O'--- (Ireland). In France we and Normandy and also in Britain we find the de--- or le--- indicating from the area or region or manor of. Also in Britain and France we find the person picking up the property title such as Lord Darnley who was Henry Stewart husband of Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart. Many families allowed the children to use the name of the parent with the greatest wealth or property as with Richard Bayley-Sherburne who chose his mother's name. That is how the Bayleys became the Sherburnes or Sherbornes. In some Native American groups such as the Cherokee (Tsa La Ghi) who call themselves the AniUnwiah (the principal people) the child may be named after the mother or father. Plus they often had serial marriages, with the female doing the chosing. This means that the children might have several different last names, in English or in Cherokee.
      So genealogy is a real test of research skills which sometimes over rules what appears as common sense.
      Robert Worden
    • John D. Stevenson
      ... Good morning Rena, ... But, that is the fascinating part about it ! Obtaining information/local knowledge from the area you are researching pays massive
      Message 61 of 61 , May 10, 2005
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        :
        Good morning Rena,
        > Researching naming patterns may sound fascinating John, but only if
        > you're
        > good at puzzles :-)
        But, that is the fascinating part about it !
        Obtaining information/local knowledge from the area you are researching pays massive dividends.
        A phone call to the village PO /shop often leads to being given a local worthies name who can supply info re the village names
        I find this especially helpful in the fishing communities
        > I too have seafaring family in Leith, Newhaven, etc.- goodness knows
        > which
        > eastern seaboard fishing village some of the earlier generations were
        > born.
        > But my biggest nightmare is finding the youngest son has filled in
        > two death
        > certificates with unexpected names! I'm waiting for Cloud 9 to float
        > up and
        > tell me where Thos. Darling fitted into the life of Mrs Agnes Mason
        > (nee
        > Sim/Syme).
        >
        > Rena in England
        Come back to Off List on this and will see what I have in my notes

        Regards.
        John.

        John D. Stevenson
        Clear blue skies , calm, 15C
        Edinburgh.
        johndee.ships@...


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