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Re: [scots-origins] Passports

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  • Julianne Mulholland
    Eileen It has been a good while since I got a look at it but I think it had a physical description as well as a photograph. The one I saw belonged to Music
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 28, 2003
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      Eileen

      It has been a good while since I got a look at it but I think it had a
      physical description as well as a photograph. The one I saw belonged to
      Music Hall Artistes (husband and wife - they were both on the same document)
      and it also gave the purpose of their travels overseas. I'm afraid I can't
      remember anything else at the moment.

      Julianne


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Eileen" <eileen@...>
      To: <scots-origins@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2003 9:59 PM
      Subject: Re: [scots-origins] Passports


      > Julianne:
      >
      > Did it give any pertinent information beyond name, address, etc.? Was
      > there a physical description or photo of the bearer?
      >
      > Eileen
      >
      > > British travellers did indeed have passports then - I don't know
      > when they
      > > changed to the book form that we know today but I have seen a
      > passport from
      > > the early 1920s that was a large piece of parchment folded over a
      > number of
      > > times until it was a rectangle of about 6 x 4 inches.
      >
      >
      >
      > -------------------------------------------------------
      > This message comes from the Scots Origins Discussion Group, sponsored by
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    • Alison Fraser
      Would I be incorrect in suggesting the folded paper format was known as a Carte Blanche which permitted free passage/unfettered travel. Thus to-day to give
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 28, 2003
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        Would I be incorrect in suggesting the folded paper format was known as a
        "Carte Blanche" which permitted free passage/unfettered travel. Thus to-day
        to give a person Carte Blanche - allow them to continue with no
        interruption.

        I know one of our History Buffs will please clarify this for me. I cannot
        remember where I gained this 'pearl of wisdom'. Could it have been a Tale
        of two Cities????

        AF(NZ)
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Eileen" <eileen@...>
        To: <scots-origins@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 10:59 AM
        Subject: Re: [scots-origins] Passports


        > Julianne:
        >
        > Did it give any pertinent information beyond name, address, etc.? Was
        > there a physical description or photo of the bearer?
        >
        > Eileen
        >
        > > British travellers did indeed have passports then - I don't know
        > when they
        > > changed to the book form that we know today but I have seen a
        > passport from
        > > the early 1920s that was a large piece of parchment folded over a
        > number of
        > > times until it was a rectangle of about 6 x 4 inches.
        >
        >
        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------
        > This message comes from the Scots Origins Discussion Group, sponsored by
        > Scots Origins (www.scotsorigins.com). The group has been set up so that
        members can share genealogical information about Scotland, to reply send an
        email to scots-origins@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > To unsubscribe send a blank email to:
        scots-origins-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Judy Strachan
        As it happens, this month s Your Family Tree magazine has a long article about passports. It says that passports became common from 1914 onwards (before that
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 28, 2003
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          As it happens, this month's 'Your Family Tree' magazine has a long article
          about passports. It says that passports became common from 1914 onwards
          (before that most countries didn't require you to have one). 1914 was also
          when they started incorporating a photograph. However, the article also
          says:

          'Sadly, the Passport Office has not retained the original application forms
          ...'

          Records of when passports were issued are held at the National Archives at
          Kew in the Foreign Office archives.

          (By the way, if anyone outside Britain is interested in the magazine, its
          title is 'Your Family History' outside the UK.)

          Regards
          Judy Strachan


          Did British travelers have passports in 1920? If so, where may I
          > obtain a copy of the application?
          >
          > Eileen
        • IACSCOTT@aol.com
          In a message dated 01/12/2003 11:32:26 GMT Standard Time, ... My old Imperial Dictionary defines Carte Blanche as a blank paper or a paper duly authenticated
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 1, 2003
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            In a message dated 01/12/2003 11:32:26 GMT Standard Time,
            wafan@... writes:

            > Would I be incorrect in suggesting the folded paper format was known as a
            > "Carte Blanche" which permitted free passage/unfettered travel. Thus to-day
            > to give a person Carte Blanche - allow them to continue with no
            > interruption.
            >
            > I know one of our History Buffs will please clarify this for me. I cannot
            > remember where I gained this 'pearl of wisdom'. Could it have been a Tale
            > of two Cities????
            >

            My old Imperial Dictionary defines Carte Blanche as a blank paper or a paper
            duly authenticated with a signature etc and intrusted to a person to be filled
            up as he pleases; hence, unconditional terms: umlimited power to decide.

            It quotes the following attributed to Disraeli

            "Lord Grey was armed with a carte blanche to create any number of peers
            necessary to insure its success".

            Ian A C Scott


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Alison Fraser
            Thanks Ian, the mist has cleared. AF(NZ) ... From: To: Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 7:10 AM Subject:
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 2, 2003
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              Thanks Ian, the mist has cleared. AF(NZ)

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <IACSCOTT@...>
              To: <scots-origins@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 7:10 AM
              Subject: Re: [scots-origins] Passports


              > In a message dated 01/12/2003 11:32:26 GMT Standard Time,
              > wafan@... writes:
              >
              > > Would I be incorrect in suggesting the folded paper format was known as
              a
              > > "Carte Blanche" which permitted free passage/unfettered travel. Thus
              to-day
              > > to give a person Carte Blanche - allow them to continue with no
              > > interruption.
              > >
              > > I know one of our History Buffs will please clarify this for me. I
              cannot
              > > remember where I gained this 'pearl of wisdom'. Could it have been a
              Tale
              > > of two Cities????
              > >
              >
              > My old Imperial Dictionary defines Carte Blanche as a blank paper or a
              paper
              > duly authenticated with a signature etc and intrusted to a person to be
              filled
              > up as he pleases; hence, unconditional terms: umlimited power to decide.
              >
              > It quotes the following attributed to Disraeli
              >
              > "Lord Grey was armed with a carte blanche to create any number of peers
              > necessary to insure its success".
              >
              > Ian A C Scott
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > -------------------------------------------------------
              > This message comes from the Scots Origins Discussion Group, sponsored by
              > Scots Origins (www.scotsorigins.com). The group has been set up so that
              members can share genealogical information about Scotland, to reply send an
              email to scots-origins@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > To unsubscribe send a blank email to:
              scots-origins-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
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