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[scots-origins] Re: Anyone from Pollokshaws?

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  • Alec Cameron
    ... A common, and convenient place for a wedding. My Scots family had such weddings recorded, 1800s and 1900s. The sanctity of a wedding is manifest in the
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 30, 1999
      Bruce Owen wrote:
      >
      > 1. I am intrigued that my gt grandparents were married in 1892 "according to
      > the Banns of the Original Secessionist Church" in "Trades Inn", Pollock St.,
      > Sounds like a pub! hard to believe though.

      A common, and convenient place for a wedding. My Scots family had such
      weddings recorded, 1800s and 1900s. The sanctity of a wedding is
      manifest in the company, not in the building structure.

      > 4. I have an address of 33, Potterfield for my grandmothers birth. Anyone
      > able to confirm that this is a street in Pollokshaws?

      Not now. You'd best look to the old maps. An estate (especially suburban
      or rural) is sometimes named that way. My great- uncle Kenny Cameron
      lived at 1, Newmore. That was a croft comprising a stone cottage and
      cuppla acres. The site and the neighbours homes are still named thus.

      > "There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
      > productive of queer folk. This town, as everybody in the west of Scotland
      > well knows is Pollokshaws, or the Shaws" Can anyone tell my why my ancestors come from a town of "queer folk"

      The work of writers often says more about the writer, than about those
      written of. That writer may have been a posh educated guy who used knife
      and fork, proper- like.

      > Bit of
      > a worry actually!!

      Yes, but some folk are related to writers! ;~)

      We choose our friends but we are stuck with our relations.


      ALISTAIR M. CAMERON, A.A.G.R.A. also known as ALEC
      acameron@... **My Ancestral File No. is TO4M-WJ**
    • slater_urie
      ... according to ... Pollock St., ... Anyone ... suburban ... Scotland ... ancestors come from a town of queer folk ... knife ... my family have roots back
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 4, 2009
        --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, Alec Cameron <acameron@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bruce Owen wrote:
        > >
        > > 1. I am intrigued that my gt grandparents were married in 1892
        "according to
        > > the Banns of the Original Secessionist Church" in "Trades Inn",
        Pollock St.,
        > > Sounds like a pub! hard to believe though.
        >
        > A common, and convenient place for a wedding. My Scots family had such
        > weddings recorded, 1800s and 1900s. The sanctity of a wedding is
        > manifest in the company, not in the building structure.
        >
        > > 4. I have an address of 33, Potterfield for my grandmothers birth.
        Anyone
        > > able to confirm that this is a street in Pollokshaws?
        >
        > Not now. You'd best look to the old maps. An estate (especially
        suburban
        > or rural) is sometimes named that way. My great- uncle Kenny Cameron
        > lived at 1, Newmore. That was a croft comprising a stone cottage and
        > cuppla acres. The site and the neighbours homes are still named thus.
        >
        > > "There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
        > > productive of queer folk. This town, as everybody in the west of
        Scotland
        > > well knows is Pollokshaws, or the Shaws" Can anyone tell my why my
        ancestors come from a town of "queer folk"
        >
        > The work of writers often says more about the writer, than about those
        > written of. That writer may have been a posh educated guy who used
        knife
        > and fork, proper- like.
        >
        > > Bit of
        > > a worry actually!!
        >
        > Yes, but some folk are related to writers! ;~)
        >
        > We choose our friends but we are stuck with our relations.
        >
        >
        > ALISTAIR M. CAMERON, A.A.G.R.A. also known as ALEC
        > acameron@... **My Ancestral File No. is TO4M-WJ**
        >
        my family have roots back to 1796 at potterfield. it was a mining
        village that became haggs rd pollokshaws.
      • David
        Taken from http://www.electricscotland.com/history/glasgow/pollokshaws.htm There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be productive of
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 10, 2009
          Taken from
          http://www.electricscotland.com/history/glasgow/pollokshaws.htm

          There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
          productive of "queer folk." This town, as everybody in the West of
          Scotland well knows, is Pollokshaws, or "the Shaws," as in common
          parlance it is generally called. The 'queer folk' were the Flemish
          people who came to live in Pollokshaws. They were called queer because
          no one could understand them. It was not the original Pollokshaws
          people who were 'queer' it was the 'queer folk' that came into
          Pollokshaws to live."]

          Pollok Street ..
          POLLOK STREET is named for the estate on which it stands. It is the
          widest street in the City, and was originally designed to be continued
          over the railway to Saint Andrew's Road, Pollokshields.
        • Bill McCorquodale
          Great info on the Pollok Shaws. Never heard of this. Here is another. Have you ever heard of the Maharq family. The Grahams were banned and sent to Ireland.
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 11, 2009
            Great info on the Pollok Shaws. Never heard of this. Here is another. Have you ever heard of the Maharq family. The Grahams were banned and sent to Ireland. They slipped back into the country as, you guessed it, the Maharg family.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: David
            To: scots-origins@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2009 12:43 PM
            Subject: [scots-origins] Re: Anyone from Pollokshaws?




            Taken from
            http://www.electricscotland.com/history/glasgow/pollokshaws.htm

            There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
            productive of "queer folk." This town, as everybody in the West of
            Scotland well knows, is Pollokshaws, or "the Shaws," as in common
            parlance it is generally called. The 'queer folk' were the Flemish
            people who came to live in Pollokshaws. They were called queer because
            no one could understand them. It was not the original Pollokshaws
            people who were 'queer' it was the 'queer folk' that came into
            Pollokshaws to live."]

            Pollok Street ..
            POLLOK STREET is named for the estate on which it stands. It is the
            widest street in the City, and was originally designed to be continued
            over the railway to Saint Andrew's Road, Pollokshields.





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • cb631@aol.com
            Hi David, does your WILSON family have any connection to the LOUGH family from POLLOKSHAWS ************** A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 11, 2009
              Hi David, does your WILSON family have any connection to the LOUGH family
              from POLLOKSHAWS


              **************
              A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in
              just 2 easy steps!
              (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1218550342x1201216770/aol?redir=http://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc=668072%26hmpgID
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Trena
              ... From: Bill McCorquodale To: scots-origins@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2009 3:48 PM Subject: Re: [scots-origins] Re: Anyone from
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 17, 2009
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Bill McCorquodale
                To: scots-origins@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2009 3:48 PM
                Subject: Re: [scots-origins] Re: Anyone from Pollokshaws?


                Great info on the Pollok Shaws. Never heard of this. Here is another. Have
                you ever heard of the Maharq family. The Grahams were banned and sent to
                Ireland. They slipped back into the country as, you guessed it, the Maharg
                family.
                ****snipped****

                Which GRAHAMs?

                Toni ~ Ontario
              • David
                Maharg - Graham Have heard this a few times. I dont know if its a myth thats been passed down or if theres any facts that can confirm it tho. Not a bad idea
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 17, 2009
                  Maharg - Graham

                  Have heard this a few times. I dont know if its a myth thats been
                  passed down or if theres any facts that can confirm it tho. Not a bad
                  idea turning the name around tho lol.

                  I did find this ...
                  Surname: Maharg
                  Recorded as Mac Harg, Maharg, McHarg, and others as shown below, this
                  is a surname of Scottish origin. It is a developed form of the pre
                  10th century Old Gaelic "MacGiolla Chairge", meaning the son of the
                  follower or devotee of Cairge. This was a saint's name of great
                  antiquity. Frequently, Gaelic family names are taken from the heads
                  of tribes, revered elders, or some illustrious warrior, but in some
                  instances, clan names indicated devotion to a particular saint or
                  holy man. The Gaelic prefix "Mac" means "son of", and "giolla", also
                  written as "gille", translates literally as "attendant, man-servant,
                  follower", but is used here in the transferred sense of "devotee".
                  There were two main branches of this family: the MacHargs of Shalloch
                  in the parish of Kirkpatrick-Irongray in Kirkcudbright, and the
                  MacHargs of Cardorkan in the parish of Minnigaff (Kirkcudbright). The
                  latter group, despite their saintly origins, appear to have been of a
                  turbulent nature; Finlay M'Quharg and others of the name
                  were "charged with fire raising, and the burning of houses belonging
                  to Steward of Fintillauch" in 1581, and in 1592 they took an active
                  part in a Galloway feud. Further forms of the name include:
                  M'Quharge, MacElharge, MacIlhargy, and MacIlhagga with Martin
                  M'Quharg who was burgess of Kirkcudbright in 1597, and on June 29th
                  1798, Isabella, daughter of Ebenezer and Barbara MacHarg, was
                  christened in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland. The first recorded
                  spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Marion M'Quharge,
                  which was dated 1493, in the "Scottish Antiquary", Edinburgh,
                  Scotland, during the reign of King James 1V of Scotland, 1488 - 1513.
                  Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal
                  taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the
                  centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop"
                  often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.


                  David


                  --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, "Bill McCorquodale" <wrmcq@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Great info on the Pollok Shaws. Never heard of this. Here is
                  another. Have you ever heard of the Maharq family. The Grahams were
                  banned and sent to Ireland. They slipped back into the country as,
                  you guessed it, the Maharg family.

                  >
                • David
                  ... family ... Hi cb... Im afraid I havent found any Loughs in my line.. yet. David
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 17, 2009
                    --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, cb631@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi David, does your WILSON family have any connection to the LOUGH
                    family
                    > from POLLOKSHAWS
                    >


                    Hi cb...

                    Im afraid I havent found any Loughs in my line.. yet.

                    David
                  • James
                    ... potterfield was an old mining village which became haggs road my ancestors lived at 19 potterfield which became 103 haggs road. it was demolished about
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 3, 2010
                      --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, "slater_urie" <slater_urie@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, Alec Cameron <acameron@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Bruce Owen wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > 1. I am intrigued that my gt grandparents were married in 1892
                      > "according to
                      > > > the Banns of the Original Secessionist Church" in "Trades Inn",
                      > Pollock St.,
                      > > > Sounds like a pub! hard to believe though.
                      > >
                      > > A common, and convenient place for a wedding. My Scots family had such
                      > > weddings recorded, 1800s and 1900s. The sanctity of a wedding is
                      > > manifest in the company, not in the building structure.
                      > >
                      > > > 4. I have an address of 33, Potterfield for my grandmothers birth.
                      > Anyone
                      > > > able to confirm that this is a street in Pollokshaws?
                      > >
                      > > Not now. You'd best look to the old maps. An estate (especially
                      > suburban
                      > > or rural) is sometimes named that way. My great- uncle Kenny Cameron
                      > > lived at 1, Newmore. That was a croft comprising a stone cottage and
                      > > cuppla acres. The site and the neighbours homes are still named thus.
                      > >
                      > > > "There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
                      > > > productive of queer folk. This town, as everybody in the west of
                      > Scotland
                      > > > well knows is Pollokshaws, or the Shaws" Can anyone tell my why my
                      > ancestors come from a town of "queer folk"
                      > >
                      > > The work of writers often says more about the writer, than about those
                      > > written of. That writer may have been a posh educated guy who used
                      > knife
                      > > and fork, proper- like.
                      > >
                      > > > Bit of
                      > > > a worry actually!!
                      > >
                      > > Yes, but some folk are related to writers! ;~)
                      > >
                      > > We choose our friends but we are stuck with our relations.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ALISTAIR M. CAMERON, A.A.G.R.A. also known as ALEC
                      > > acameron@ **My Ancestral File No. is TO4M-WJ**
                      > >
                      > my family have roots back to 1796 at potterfield. it was a mining
                      > village that became haggs rd pollokshaws.
                      >
                      potterfield was an old mining village which became haggs road my ancestors lived at 19 potterfield which became 103 haggs road. it was demolished about 1900. the nearest mine (coal) was lochinch which was in the pollok estate
                    • James
                      ... Pollok street in pollokshaws is now called greenview street. originally it was called cow loan.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Nov 9, 2010
                        --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, "David" <david.wilson22@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Taken from
                        > http://www.electricscotland.com/history/glasgow/pollokshaws.htm
                        >
                        > There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
                        > productive of "queer folk." This town, as everybody in the West of
                        > Scotland well knows, is Pollokshaws, or "the Shaws," as in common
                        > parlance it is generally called. The 'queer folk' were the Flemish
                        > people who came to live in Pollokshaws. They were called queer because
                        > no one could understand them. It was not the original Pollokshaws
                        > people who were 'queer' it was the 'queer folk' that came into
                        > Pollokshaws to live."]
                        >
                        > Pollok Street ..
                        > POLLOK STREET is named for the estate on which it stands. It is the
                        > widest street in the City, and was originally designed to be continued
                        > over the railway to Saint Andrew's Road, Pollokshields.
                        >
                        Pollok street in pollokshaws is now called greenview street. originally it was called cow loan.
                      • James
                        ... the calico print works was in thornliebank near pollokshaws and was owned by alexander crum. his library still stands in use today. the queer folk of the
                        Message 11 of 12 , Nov 9, 2010
                          --- In scots-origins@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Owen" <bsowen@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I have tracked my ancestry back to this town and to Thornliebank south of
                          > Glasgow (Boyd and Moran). Is there anyone in the group from this town who
                          > might be able to answer some questions about it?
                          > 1. I am intrigued that my gt grandparents were married in 1892 "according to
                          > the Banns of the Original Secessionist Church" in "Trades Inn", Pollock St.,
                          > Sounds like a pub! hard to believe though. Does anyone what "Trades Inn" is
                          > and did they carry out marriages there?
                          > 2. Is there a local newspaper in circulation in this town today?
                          > 3. Two of my ancestors were "printfield workers" here, and I understand that
                          > there used to be a calico printing works in the town. Any info about this
                          > would be appreciated. There is a 2 volume or more book called Villages of
                          > Scotland with a history of Pollokshaws in it, but infuriatingly our National
                          > Library database in New Zealand only has vol 1. Anyone who has this book
                          > might be able to assist.
                          > 4. I have an address of 33, Potterfield for my grandmothers birth. Anyone
                          > able to confirm that this is a street in Pollokshaws?
                          > 5. Hugh McDonalds essay "Rambles Around Glasgow" written last century has
                          > the following surprising quote
                          > "There is one town, however, which is said, par excellence, to be
                          > productive of queer folk. This town, as everybody in the west of Scotland
                          > well knows is Pollokshaws, or the Shaws"
                          > Can anyone tell my why my ancestors come from a town of "queer folk" Bit of
                          > a worry actually!!
                          > Bruce Owen
                          >
                          the calico print works was in thornliebank near pollokshaws and was owned by alexander crum. his library still stands in use today.
                          the queer folk of the shaws was probably related to the hugenots from france (persecuted protestants). a lot of them moved here and were probably the original queer folk as shaws people didnt understand them
                          Aileen Smart has a book called Villages of glasgow south of the clyde. its a good read.
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