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Fw: RIP Andre Norton 1912-2005

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  • Amy Harlib
    ... of its greatest!
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 18, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      > aharlib@...
      >
      > AUGH!!!
      > One of my all-time favorites has gone from this life! SF & F has lost one
      of its greatest!
      > SHE WILL BE MISSED!
      > *sigh*
      > Amy
      >
      > Subject: [original_fantasy] RIP Andre Norton
      > > 1912-2005
      > >
      > >
      > > Here's the AP obit:
      > >
      > > NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Science fiction and fantasy
      > > author Andre Norton,
      > > who wrote the popular "Witch World" series, has
      > > died. She was 93.
      > >
      > > Her death was announced by friend Jean Rabe, who
      > > said Norton died
      > > Thursday of congestive heart failure at her home in
      > > Murfreesboro, a
      > > Nashville suburb.
      > >
      > > Norton requested before her death that she not have
      > > a funeral
      > > service, but instead asked to be cremated along with
      > > a copy of her
      > > first and last novels.
      > >
      > > Born Alice Mary Norton on Feb. 17, 1912, in
      > > Cleveland, she wrote more
      > > than 130 books in many genres during her career of
      > > nearly 70 years.
      > > She used a pen name -- which she made her legal name
      > > in 1934 --
      > > because she expected to be writing mostly for young
      > > boys and thought
      > > a male name would help sales.
      > >
      > > The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America
      > > recently created
      > > the Andre Norton Award for young adult novels, and
      > > the first award
      > > will be presented in 2006.
      > >
      > > "She was wonderful with new or younger writers,"
      > > said Jane Jewell,
      > > executive director of SFWA. "On many occasions, she
      > > worked with new
      > > writers and collaborated with them on novels to help
      > > them get
      > > started."
      > >
      > > Her first novel, "The Prince Commands," is set in a
      > > mythical European
      > > kingdom and tells of a young nobleman who returns
      > > from exile to stop
      > > a communist takeover of his homeland. It was
      > > published in 1934 when
      > > Norton was 22. The "Witch World" series, which
      > > details life on an
      > > imaginary planet reachable only through hidden
      > > gateways, included
      > > more than 30 novels.
      > >
      > > She was the first woman to receive the Grand Master
      > > of Fantasy Award
      > > from the SFWA in 1977, and she won the Nebula Grand
      > > Master Award in
      > > 1984.
      > >
      > > Her last complete novel, "Three Hands of Scorpio,"
      > > is set to be
      > > released in April. Norton's publisher, Tor Books,
      > > rushed to have one
      > > copy printed so that the author, who had been sick
      > > for almost a year,
      > > could see it.
      > >
      > > "She was able to hold it on Friday," Jewell said.
      > > "She took it and
      > > said, 'What a pretty cobalt blue for the cover.'"
      > >
      > > Norton spent most of her life in Cleveland, where
      > > she worked as a
      > > librarian from 1932 to 1950, except for a brief
      > > stint in the 1940s
      > > when she ran her own bookstore in Mount Ranier, Md.,
      > > and worked at
      > > the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
      > >
      > > Norton and her mother, Bertha Stemm Norton, who also
      > > served as her in-
      > > house proofreader and editor for decades, moved to
      > > Winter Park, Fla.,
      > > in 1966 for their health. Norton moved to Tennessee
      > > in 1996 because
      > > she wanted to start a library for genre writers and
      > > didn't like the
      > > population explosion in Florida. She found a farm in
      > > rural Monterey,
      > > about 85 miles east of Nashville.
      > >
      > > But the hills of east Tennessee were too isolated
      > > for her and her
      > > assistant, Rose Wolf. A friend helped them find the
      > > house in
      > > Murfreesboro.
      > >
      > > She established The High Hallack Genre Writer's
      > > Research and
      > > Reference Library in 1999 on a quiet residential
      > > street in the town
      > > about 30 miles southeast of Nashville. High Hallack
      > > is the name of a
      > > country in "Witch World."
      > >
      > > Norton opened the library in a converted three-car
      > > garage as a
      > > retreat where authors could research ancient
      > > religions, weaponry,
      > > mythology or history that they need to bring their
      > > stories to life.
      > > The library includes biographies, diaries,
      > > histories, science books --
      > > almost anything a writer might need to craft a
      > > realistic setting on
      > > any world in any time.
      > >
      > > Norton said detailed research matters in fiction
      > > because today's
      > > education is so inadequate that many people must get
      > > their history
      > > from novels. If an author makes historical detail
      > > interesting, a
      > > reader might be inspired to research the subject
      > > more.
      > >
      > > "It's an opening to another kind of life," she said
      > > in a 1999
      > > interview with The Associated Press.
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > *************************************************************
      > Fantasy and Science Fiction Book Lover's Resource Site
      > http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Nova/7320/
      > Here are some sources for used and out-of-print books
      > http://sf_world.homestead.com
      > *************************************************************
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Amy Harlib
      ... of its greatest!
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 18, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > aharlib@...
        >
        > AUGH!!!
        > One of my all-time favorites has gone from this life! SF & F has lost one
        of its greatest!
        > SHE WILL BE MISSED!
        > *sigh*
        > Amy
        >
        > Subject: [original_fantasy] RIP Andre Norton
        > > 1912-2005
        > >
        > >
        > > Here's the AP obit:
        > >
        > > NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Science fiction and fantasy
        > > author Andre Norton,
        > > who wrote the popular "Witch World" series, has
        > > died. She was 93.
        > >
        > > Her death was announced by friend Jean Rabe, who
        > > said Norton died
        > > Thursday of congestive heart failure at her home in
        > > Murfreesboro, a
        > > Nashville suburb.
        > >
        > > Norton requested before her death that she not have
        > > a funeral
        > > service, but instead asked to be cremated along with
        > > a copy of her
        > > first and last novels.
        > >
        > > Born Alice Mary Norton on Feb. 17, 1912, in
        > > Cleveland, she wrote more
        > > than 130 books in many genres during her career of
        > > nearly 70 years.
        > > She used a pen name -- which she made her legal name
        > > in 1934 --
        > > because she expected to be writing mostly for young
        > > boys and thought
        > > a male name would help sales.
        > >
        > > The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America
        > > recently created
        > > the Andre Norton Award for young adult novels, and
        > > the first award
        > > will be presented in 2006.
        > >
        > > "She was wonderful with new or younger writers,"
        > > said Jane Jewell,
        > > executive director of SFWA. "On many occasions, she
        > > worked with new
        > > writers and collaborated with them on novels to help
        > > them get
        > > started."
        > >
        > > Her first novel, "The Prince Commands," is set in a
        > > mythical European
        > > kingdom and tells of a young nobleman who returns
        > > from exile to stop
        > > a communist takeover of his homeland. It was
        > > published in 1934 when
        > > Norton was 22. The "Witch World" series, which
        > > details life on an
        > > imaginary planet reachable only through hidden
        > > gateways, included
        > > more than 30 novels.
        > >
        > > She was the first woman to receive the Grand Master
        > > of Fantasy Award
        > > from the SFWA in 1977, and she won the Nebula Grand
        > > Master Award in
        > > 1984.
        > >
        > > Her last complete novel, "Three Hands of Scorpio,"
        > > is set to be
        > > released in April. Norton's publisher, Tor Books,
        > > rushed to have one
        > > copy printed so that the author, who had been sick
        > > for almost a year,
        > > could see it.
        > >
        > > "She was able to hold it on Friday," Jewell said.
        > > "She took it and
        > > said, 'What a pretty cobalt blue for the cover.'"
        > >
        > > Norton spent most of her life in Cleveland, where
        > > she worked as a
        > > librarian from 1932 to 1950, except for a brief
        > > stint in the 1940s
        > > when she ran her own bookstore in Mount Ranier, Md.,
        > > and worked at
        > > the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
        > >
        > > Norton and her mother, Bertha Stemm Norton, who also
        > > served as her in-
        > > house proofreader and editor for decades, moved to
        > > Winter Park, Fla.,
        > > in 1966 for their health. Norton moved to Tennessee
        > > in 1996 because
        > > she wanted to start a library for genre writers and
        > > didn't like the
        > > population explosion in Florida. She found a farm in
        > > rural Monterey,
        > > about 85 miles east of Nashville.
        > >
        > > But the hills of east Tennessee were too isolated
        > > for her and her
        > > assistant, Rose Wolf. A friend helped them find the
        > > house in
        > > Murfreesboro.
        > >
        > > She established The High Hallack Genre Writer's
        > > Research and
        > > Reference Library in 1999 on a quiet residential
        > > street in the town
        > > about 30 miles southeast of Nashville. High Hallack
        > > is the name of a
        > > country in "Witch World."
        > >
        > > Norton opened the library in a converted three-car
        > > garage as a
        > > retreat where authors could research ancient
        > > religions, weaponry,
        > > mythology or history that they need to bring their
        > > stories to life.
        > > The library includes biographies, diaries,
        > > histories, science books --
        > > almost anything a writer might need to craft a
        > > realistic setting on
        > > any world in any time.
        > >
        > > Norton said detailed research matters in fiction
        > > because today's
        > > education is so inadequate that many people must get
        > > their history
        > > from novels. If an author makes historical detail
        > > interesting, a
        > > reader might be inspired to research the subject
        > > more.
        > >
        > > "It's an opening to another kind of life," she said
        > > in a 1999
        > > interview with The Associated Press.
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > *************************************************************
        > Fantasy and Science Fiction Book Lover's Resource Site
        > http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Nova/7320/
        > Here are some sources for used and out-of-print books
        > http://sf_world.homestead.com
        > *************************************************************
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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