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Petition to save the Hubble

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  • Amy Harlib
    aharlib@earthlink.net Maybe some of you science buffs, nature lovers and science fiction lovers would be interested. As you may know, NASA has decided to
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2004
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      aharlib@...
      Maybe some of you science buffs, nature lovers and science fiction lovers
      would be interested. As you
      may know, NASA has decided to abandon the Hubble Space Station and not
      do any more repairs. It's expected to decay within a very short time.
      A friend, from another list, a physics major at UCSC, forwarded me this link
      to a petition to save the Hubble. I already signed.
      Amy

      Begin forwarded message:
      >
      > thought you might be interested in this
      >
      > http://www.savethehubble.org/petition.jsp
      >
      > BBC website also has an article on a related site
    • raybell_scot
      ... lovers ... not ... time. ... this link ... Is it me or was that thing seemingly jinxed from the start? It does seem ironic in view of Bush s commitment
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 3, 2004
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        --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Amy Harlib"
        <aharlib@e...> wrote:
        >
        > aharlib@e...
        > Maybe some of you science buffs, nature lovers and science fiction
        lovers
        > would be interested. As you
        > may know, NASA has decided to abandon the Hubble Space Station and
        not
        > do any more repairs. It's expected to decay within a very short
        time.
        > A friend, from another list, a physics major at UCSC, forwarded me
        this link
        > to a petition to save the Hubble. I already signed.

        Is it me or was that thing seemingly jinxed from the start?

        It does seem ironic in view of Bush's "commitment" to going to Mars
        and the Moon.
      • Steve Something
        ... fiction ... and ... me ... Mars ... It s you. The jinx was entirely predictable given the cause, and the fact that the same lack of vision in the
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 3, 2004
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          --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "raybell_scot"
          <raybell_scot@y...> wrote:
          > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Amy Harlib"
          > <aharlib@e...> wrote:
          > >
          > > aharlib@e...
          > > Maybe some of you science buffs, nature lovers and science
          fiction
          > lovers
          > > would be interested. As you
          > > may know, NASA has decided to abandon the Hubble Space Station
          and
          > not
          > > do any more repairs. It's expected to decay within a very short
          > time.
          > > A friend, from another list, a physics major at UCSC, forwarded
          me
          > this link
          > > to a petition to save the Hubble. I already signed.
          >
          > Is it me or was that thing seemingly jinxed from the start?
          >
          > It does seem ironic in view of Bush's "commitment" to going to
          Mars
          > and the Moon.

          It's you. The "jinx" was entirely predictable given the cause, and
          the fact that the same lack of vision in the bean-counting has
          resulted in much the same result in other space projects.

          Bush has made no commitment to going to the Moon or Mars. He just
          said, like his dad did back in the late Eighties, that it would be a
          good idea. I agree with his statement, but probably have more to
          back me up than he does. NASA lost points with me by publically
          stating yesterday that they could go back to the moon "cheaper than
          last time". Like we actually have the hardware, knowledge or even
          the notes from the last time. Since project Apollo was a government
          one, the participating manufacturers were compelled by law to
          destroy all records of their work after a certain time. There was no
          centralised effort to keep copies, since the fabrication techniques
          were private property of the companies involved, and no-one cared
          any more. This was reported (again, in the late Eighties) in Omni
          magazine. No-one noticed.

          The hubble isn't about to fall out of the sky, by the way.
          Its "immenent" demise will be some three years or so in our future
          (I should be so lucky to have that long a working life guaranteed).
          I don't want the funding pulled either, by the way, but if we are
          going to save the thing we have to demonstrate that we listen to
          what the operators of it actually are saying, otherwise we run the
          risk of being dismissed as ephemeral Trek-Tekkers.

          While I am at this place, how many of you actually go to the hubble
          part of the NASA website and look at the free pictures of the
          greatest show ever made?

          Steve.
        • bob_wall@yahoo.com
          ... wrote: being dismissed as ephemeral Trek-Tekkers. ... I do, I do. And it is awesome.
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2004
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            --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Something"
            <ss1400@y...> wrote:
            being dismissed as ephemeral Trek-Tekkers.
            >
            > While I am at this place, how many of you actually go to the hubble
            > part of the NASA website and look at the free pictures of the
            > greatest show ever made?
            >
            > Steve.

            I do, I do. And it is awesome.
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