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Re: New member seeking reading list suggestions

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  • tamburix
    ... My suggestions would be Carl Sagan - Contact and any of Arthur Clarke s books - Rama, Odisey 2001 etc etc. -- Aleksandar Novi Sad, Serbia
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 2, 2003
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      > 1. I'm interested in physics/relativistic themes - time travel,
      > wormholes, parallel/alternate universes etc (the real science), so I
      > think I definitely need something hard SF, no soft or fantasy.

      My suggestions would be Carl Sagan - Contact and any of Arthur
      Clarke's books - Rama, Odisey 2001 etc etc.


      --

      Aleksandar
      Novi Sad, Serbia
      http://tamburix.tripod.com

      Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup!
    • derhexer@aol.com
      In a message dated 6/2/2003 4:01:04 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... May I suggest Vernor Vinge s Peace War, Marooned in RealTime, Fire Upon the Deep or Deepness
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 2, 2003
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        In a message dated 6/2/2003 4:01:04 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        cshinaberry19@... writes:

        > As far as more recent things, I've tried some Brin and Clarke's Rama
        > series (both heartily recommended to me by friends), but again, it
        > just didn't quite do it for me.
        >
        > "Put off" is perhaps a little bit too strong a term for the
        > experience I've had - more like I'm just not finding exactly what I'm
        > looking for. Everyting up to this point has left me fairly lukewarm -
        > not awful, intriguing, just not quite right.
        >

        May I suggest Vernor Vinge's Peace War, Marooned in RealTime, Fire Upon the
        Deep or Deepness in the Sky; Gregory Benford's COSM, or Timescape; Charles
        Sheffield's Between The Strokes of Night; John Varley's Ophiuchi Hotline; Larry
        Niven's Ringworld; Niven and Pournelle's Mote in God's Eye; Jack McDevitt's
        Engines of God; Ursula LeGuin's Dispossesed or Left Hand of Darkness; David Brin's
        and Gregory Bemford' Heart of The Comet; Harry Turtledove's Guns of The
        South; or (if you have a strong stomach) Stirling's Draka series?


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Amy Harlib
        aharlib@earthlink.net Try just about anything by Hal Clement, Charles Sheffield, James Hogan, Donald Moffitt, Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov. Cheers! Amy
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 3, 2003
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          aharlib@...
          Try just about anything by Hal Clement, Charles Sheffield, James Hogan,
          Donald Moffitt, Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov.
          Cheers!
          Amy


          > I am completely new to the SF genre, and in the process of asking the
          > questions I have to ask, will probably commit some egregious blunders
          > of terminology. Apologies in advance for any such breaches or inane-
          > sounding sputterings.
          >
          > I have been an astronomy/cosmology/space enthusiast all my life, and
          > have felt attracted to SF almost as long - I've tried numerous times
          > to get into it without success. By all accounts, I should LOVE it -
          > so perhaps I'm just not reading the right things. I try a couple,
          > get frustrated, and go read other things for a while until I feel the
          > pull again to try. I'm hoping someone can point me in the direction
          > of some titles I would enjoy. Here is how I would define what I
          > would LIKE to read (to the best of my ability):
          >
          > 1. I'm interested in physics/relativistic themes - time travel,
          > wormholes, parallel/alternate universes etc (the real science), so I
          > think I definitely need something hard SF, no soft or fantasy.
          >
          > 2. I'm fascinated by the "atomic era" of the 1950s and 1960s, post H-
          > bomb, pre-Moon shot - I love the space art of the era (Chesley
          > Bonestell et al) and the vision that expresses... I would like to
          > read things written during that time that encapsulate some of that
          > spirit of exploration when people still thought we might be visiting
          > other worlds by the year 2000! I've read several books from this
          > time period on the subject of moon landings/space colonies/etc, but
          > what has left me cold about them is the fact that many of them are
          > really just traditional adventure stories (substitute aliens for
          > Cowboys and Indians) and that's not really the route I want to go.
          > I'm interested in stuff from that era, but more IDEA based and not
          > action, shoot-em-up-laser-blaster based, if that makes any sense.
          > Well-written is always good.
          >
          > 3. Subjects like "Vulcan mind melding" (ack, sorry for the term,
          > best I can come up with), culture collisions, stories that use SF to
          > explore the psyche and human condition are also appealing, but also
          > preferably from the 50s/60s era.
          >
          > If you have ANY idea where I'm coming from and what books I might
          > enjoy giving a try, I would GREATLY appreciate any and all
          > suggestions. Don't feel that you must limit yourself to books
          > currently in print. I am a used book junkie, and I love those old
          > 50s and 60s paperbacks (as well as rooting around in bookstores and
          > auctions trying to find them).
          >
          > Thanks in advance for any help.
          >
          > Cheers from a frustrated potential SF fan,
          >
          > Courtney E. Shinaberry
          >
          >
          >
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        • Ignacio Viglizzo
          ... for ... .... Asimov s Lucky Starr novels! ===== Ignacio __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Calendar - Free online calendar with sync
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 3, 2003
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            --- derhexer@... wrote:
            >> Oh, I don't know about that. There was some good SF written in the 1950s
            for
            >
            > the period. I stress for the period, because I think that SF has grown up
            > quite a bit and it is not quite fair to compare the SF written in the 50s
            > w/SF
            > written in the 90s..
            >
            > Examples of good SF for the 50s - Asimov's Foundation series, as well as
            > Current of Space, Pebble in the Sky; Heinlein's juvenile series, as well as
            > Doorway to Summer and a few other adult novels; Clarke's City and The Stars
            ....
            Asimov's Lucky Starr novels!

            =====
            Ignacio

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          • cshinaberry19
            ... OH! I am such a Sagan fan, and I wanted so much to LOVE Contact, but it fell flat for me. The premise was outstanding, and the development of the
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 3, 2003
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              tamburix <tamburix@h...> wrote:
              > My suggestions would be Carl Sagan - Contact and any of Arthur
              > Clarke's books - Rama, Odisey 2001 etc etc.

              OH! I am such a Sagan fan, and I wanted so much to LOVE Contact, but
              it fell flat for me. The premise was outstanding, and the
              development of the scientific/theoretical aspect was fine, but the
              characters seemed wooden and the dialogue was ham-handed and stilted,
              to put it mildly. The characters simply weren't believable for me -
              I didn't feel any empathy for them. Sagan's NF writing is
              outstanding and his vision was magnificent - I'm suprised Contact was
              such a disappointment for me.

              Cheers,
              Courtney
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