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  • viglizzo
    How about picking a book to read in group?
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 30, 2002
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      How about picking a book to read in group?
    • Steve Something
      Donnerjack, which I picked up at I-Con 22 in April, by (the late) Roger Zelazny and Jane Lindskold. A VR story, and slow going. No intro, so I m guessing when
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 8, 2003
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        Donnerjack, which I picked up at I-Con 22 in April, by (the late)
        Roger Zelazny and Jane Lindskold.

        A VR story, and slow going.

        No intro, so I'm guessing when I say this is a ghost project worked
        up from a partial book plus notes into its final form by Lindskold
        after Zelany was lost to us (anyone know for sure?). Mebbee there is
        an entry in the bible for it. I'll look tonight and see.

        I'm still not getting into this book. I don't know whether that's
        because:

        * I am not in the mood for Zelazny's style (never happened before but
        there's always a first time, as they say)

        * Lindskold's touch is buggering up the experience (I have no
        recolection of reading anything else by her so I cannot say for sure)

        * the story just blows (VR stories are a particularly unwelcome
        subgenre in my view since they are usually excuses to write high
        fantasy under the cloak of science fiction; almost like the author
        doesn't have the guts to just tell the story they have in mind,
        probably because when all's said and done it has been told umptytump
        times before by better tellers).

        One of the sub-plots is very interesting, and if it weren't for that
        I probably would have commited heresey by abandoning this one.

        Steve.
      • Steve Something
        Monstrous Regiment by Pratchett (again), Field of Dishonour by Webber and Edgeworks Volume II by Ellison. It s all go. Steve.
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 21, 2004
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          "Monstrous Regiment" by Pratchett (again), "Field of Dishonour" by
          Webber and "Edgeworks Volume II" by Ellison.

          It's all go.

          Steve.
        • Wildfire
          ... Lord Soho by Richard Calder Song Of Susannah by Steven King though im finding it hard to read anything because im being distracted by Icewind Dale II
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 21, 2004
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            --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Something"
            <ss1400@y...> wrote:
            > "Monstrous Regiment" by Pratchett (again), "Field of Dishonour" by
            > Webber and "Edgeworks Volume II" by Ellison.
            >
            > It's all go.
            >
            > Steve.

            Lord Soho by Richard Calder
            Song Of Susannah by Steven King
            though im finding it hard to read anything because im
            being distracted by Icewind Dale II
            Wildfire
          • Aleksandar Cocek
            ... Finished King s CuCujolast night. It was interesting on first half but then it all finished so fast, lots of unanswered questions left ... a bit
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 22, 2004
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              --- Steve Something <ssss00@...> wrote:

              > "Monstrous Regiment" by Pratchett (again), "Field of
              > DiDishonourby
              > Webber and "EdEdgeworksolume II" by Ellison.
              >

              Finished King's "CuCujolast night. It was interesting
              on first half but then it all finished so fast, lots
              of unanswered questions left ... a bit
              didisappointedith this book.

              =====
              Aleksandar
              http://tamburix.modblog.com



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            • Steve Something
              ... And I just finished Pratchetts The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents . Good stuff. Doing The Wee Free Men now . Steve.
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 23, 2004
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                --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Something"
                <ss1400@y...> wrote:
                > "Monstrous Regiment" by Pratchett (again), "Field of Dishonour" by
                > Webber and "Edgeworks Volume II" by Ellison.
                >
                > It's all go.
                >
                > Steve.

                And I just finished Pratchetts "The Amazing Maurice and his Educated
                Rodents". Good stuff.

                Doing "The Wee Free Men now".

                Steve.
              • Ignacio Viglizzo
                I ve been reading Singularity Sky by Stross, and September s issue of Asimov s (more Stross there!) Now I m undecided whether to start Titan by Baxter or
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 25, 2004
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                  I've been reading "Singularity Sky" by Stross, and September's issue
                  of Asimov's (more Stross there!) Now I'm undecided whether to start
                  "Titan" by Baxter or "Worlds" by Haldeman...


                  --
                  Ignacio
                • poochorange
                  I also just read Singularity Sky, prompted by the thread a couple hundred postss back about the Popular Science review. I enjoyed the book, but I don t
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 26, 2004
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                    I also just read "Singularity Sky," prompted by the thread a couple
                    hundred postss back about the Popular Science review. I enjoyed the
                    book, but I don't think Stross is the next new thing that review
                    implied. In fact Stross seems to me very much in the middle of
                    British science fiction, and in stride with Banks and Macleod and
                    McAuley and Reynolds. What did you think?

                    jr

                    --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, Ignacio Viglizzo
                    <viglizzo@g...> wrote:
                    > I've been reading "Singularity Sky" by Stross, and September's issue
                    > of Asimov's (more Stross there!) Now I'm undecided whether to start
                    > "Titan" by Baxter or "Worlds" by Haldeman...
                    >
                    >
                    > --
                    > Ignacio
                  • Ignacio Viglizzo
                    I read one novel by Macleod,, and a couple by Banks, but I enjoy Stross much more, and I think he goes a step further than the others in imagining a future
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 28, 2004
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                      I read one novel by Macleod,, and a couple by Banks, but I enjoy
                      Stross much more, and I think he goes a step further than the others
                      in imagining a future that's close to us and yet vastly unimaginated.
                      Not as good as Egan, but I feel he's on the right track of what I want
                      from SF. I keep hoping Stross will improve his writing in the next one
                      ;)

                      BTW, Singularity Sky will be Book of the month at the Hard SF group:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hardsf/
                      Best,



                      On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 03:11:52 -0000, poochorange
                      <jonathanrobinson@...> wrote:
                      > I also just read "Singularity Sky," prompted by the thread a couple
                      > hundred postss back about the Popular Science review. I enjoyed the
                      > book, but I don't think Stross is the next new thing that review
                      > implied. In fact Stross seems to me very much in the middle of
                      > British science fiction, and in stride with Banks and Macleod and
                      > McAuley and Reynolds. What did you think?
                      >
                      > jr
                      --
                      Ignacio
                    • poochorange
                      Fair enough, tho I feel more warmly toward Banks and Macleod than you. I have only read one novel by Egan, Permutation City . I liked the opening but felt
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 28, 2004
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                        Fair enough, tho' I feel more warmly toward Banks and Macleod than
                        you. I have only read one novel by Egan, "Permutation City". I liked
                        the opening but felt it sort of vanished up its own tail at the end.

                        jr
                        Thanx for the pointer to the hardsf group, too. :?)

                        --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, Ignacio Viglizzo
                        <viglizzo@g...> wrote:
                        > I read one novel by Macleod,, and a couple by Banks, but I enjoy
                        > Stross much more, and I think he goes a step further than the others
                        > in imagining a future that's close to us and yet vastly unimaginated.
                        > Not as good as Egan, but I feel he's on the right track of what I want
                        > from SF. I keep hoping Stross will improve his writing in the next one
                        > ;)
                        >
                        > BTW, Singularity Sky will be Book of the month at the Hard SF group:
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hardsf/
                        > Best,
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 03:11:52 -0000, poochorange
                        > <jonathanrobinson@s...> wrote:
                        > > I also just read "Singularity Sky," prompted by the thread a couple
                        > > hundred postss back about the Popular Science review. I enjoyed the
                        > > book, but I don't think Stross is the next new thing that review
                        > > implied. In fact Stross seems to me very much in the middle of
                        > > British science fiction, and in stride with Banks and Macleod and
                        > > McAuley and Reynolds. What did you think?
                        > >
                        > > jr
                        > --
                        > Ignacio
                      • raybell_scot
                        ... others ... unimaginated. MacLeod is excellent. I read his Engines of Light trilogy in August. The only thing is that the first book - to my mind anyway -
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 29, 2004
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                          --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, Ignacio Viglizzo
                          <viglizzo@g...> wrote:
                          > I read one novel by Macleod,, and a couple by Banks, but I enjoy
                          > Stross much more, and I think he goes a step further than the
                          others
                          > in imagining a future that's close to us and yet vastly
                          unimaginated.

                          MacLeod is excellent. I read his Engines of Light trilogy in August.
                          The only thing is that the first book - to my mind anyway - doesn't
                          completely explain how the Soviets gained wider Western European
                          influence in that world than in our own. Perhaps someone can
                          enlighten me!
                        • Steve Something
                          I picked up a copy of Dragonfly at a book sale (a dollar a paperback, two for a hardback) which purports to be the story of the American Astronauts aboard
                          Message 12 of 12 , Feb 3 5:28 AM
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                            I picked up a copy of "Dragonfly" at a book sale (a dollar a
                            paperback, two for a hardback) which purports to be the story of the
                            American Astronauts aboard Mir.

                            Very unevenly put together, it dodges back and forth over the
                            subjects like a person who starts telling a story who dodges off to
                            give explanitory exposition recursively thus making the original
                            tale difficult to follow.

                            But.

                            It does highlight some of the failings of the Mir program and the
                            hardware itself.

                            An interesting read for anyone who was involved in the "Why scrap
                            it?" debate here a few years ago (search the archives if you're
                            interested. I'm afraid I don't have time right now).

                            If what this guy says is true, the wonder is no-one was killed in
                            the thing.

                            Steve.
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