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Re: Hey from South Jersey

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  • bob_wall
    ... wrote: I ve read alot of criticism of ... evidence ... anything ... market. ... Spider, The book does have a racist slant that you will find farther into
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 7, 2002
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      --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., spider38ss <no_reply@y...>
      wrote:
      I've read alot of criticism of
      > this book(mainly that its rascist) but so far I haven't seen
      evidence
      > of Heinlein as a rascist. I'm only on page 76. So far, if
      anything
      > it has been unabashedly patriotic, libertarian, and pro-free
      market.
      > Spider

      Spider,

      The book does have a racist slant that you will find farther into it.
      I don't think Heinlein was racist, but if this was the only book by
      RAH that somebody read, I could see where they would get that
      idea. This doesn't prevent Farnahm's Freehold from being a good
      book. It reflects the period (and paranoia) in which it was written.
      I don't always agree with what RAH wrote, but I enjoyed all of his
      books.

      This is the only RAH book I have in hardcover. Come to think of
      it, it's the only one remember seeing in hardcover outside of a
      library. I don't remember where I got it. Maybe at a library sale.

      Later,
      Bob
    • spider38ss
      ... it. ... written. ... Bob, It sounds like you and I have similar takes on Heinlein; he is neither God nor Demon. I don t necessarily like him, but I
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 7, 2002
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        --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., "bob_wall" <bob_wall@y...> wrote:
        > --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., spider38ss <no_reply@y...>
        > wrote:
        > I've read alot of criticism of
        > > this book(mainly that its rascist) but so far I haven't seen
        > evidence
        > > of Heinlein as a rascist. I'm only on page 76. So far, if
        > anything
        > > it has been unabashedly patriotic, libertarian, and pro-free
        > market.
        > > Spider
        >
        > Spider,
        >
        > The book does have a racist slant that you will find farther into
        it.
        > I don't think Heinlein was racist, but if this was the only book by
        > RAH that somebody read, I could see where they would get that
        > idea. This doesn't prevent Farnahm's Freehold from being a good
        > book. It reflects the period (and paranoia) in which it was
        written.
        > I don't always agree with what RAH wrote, but I enjoyed all of his
        > books.
        >
        > This is the only RAH book I have in hardcover. Come to think of
        > it, it's the only one remember seeing in hardcover outside of a
        > library. I don't remember where I got it. Maybe at a library sale.
        >
        > Later,
        > Bob

        Bob,
        It sounds like you and I have similar takes on Heinlein; he is
        neither God nor Demon. I don't necessarily like him, but I respect
        him. You're right, this book definitely reflects Cold War attitudes,
        and hopefully I'll see more evidence of the American Civil Rights Era
        attitudes, although so far, Joseph's character, and the white
        characters' interactions with him, seem to be formed from the G W
        Carver(reactive) mold than the WEB Dubois(proactive) mold.
        Furthermore, Joseph's character seems to more represent the attitudes
        that whites of that would have liked to have seen in a "good negro"
        than the attitudes that a self actualizing, and independent black man
        of the time would have held. There's something child-like about
        Joseph at this stage in the novel.......I'll have to read more.
        Thanks for the objective opinions on RAH.
        Spider(Steve)
      • Pete Young
        ... Did you read the edition which was translated by Clarence Brown (the Penguin Twentieth Century Classics edition)? I found Brown s introduction very
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 8, 2002
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          on 7/6/2002 04:33 pm, spider38ss wrote:

          > I'm signing in from New Jersey, where I'm visiting my sisters. The
          > flight from Milwaukee allowed me to finish Zamiatin's WE

          Did you read the edition which was translated by Clarence Brown (the Penguin
          Twentieth Century Classics edition)? I found Brown's introduction very
          informative, and particularly liked his description of 'We' as "a clunky old
          post-modern monster"... very apt. 'We' is a very appealing book.

          Pete
        • spider38ss
          ... The ... (the Penguin ... very ... clunky old ... Pete, Mine s a Dutton paperback which was a 70 s reissue of the 1952 edition, with an introduction and
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 8, 2002
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            --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., Pete Young <pete-young@m...>
            wrote:
            > on 7/6/2002 04:33 pm, spider38ss wrote:
            >
            > > I'm signing in from New Jersey, where I'm visiting my sisters.
            The
            > > flight from Milwaukee allowed me to finish Zamiatin's WE
            >
            > Did you read the edition which was translated by Clarence Brown
            (the Penguin
            > Twentieth Century Classics edition)? I found Brown's introduction
            very
            > informative, and particularly liked his description of 'We' as "a
            clunky old
            > post-modern monster"... very apt. 'We' is a very appealing book.
            >
            > Pete

            Pete,
            Mine's a Dutton paperback which was a 70's reissue of the 1952
            edition, with an introduction and translation by Gregory
            Zilboorg. "Clunky, old post-modern monster"....hmmm. Clunky in its
            technological aspects for certain, but depending on your station in
            our glorious global economy, the obsession with "taylorism", not as a
            social organization, but as an economic one, is very unclunky and
            still relevant. I agree, a very appealing book. I'll have to read
            Clarence Brown's introduction, I'm intrigued.
            Spider(Steve)
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