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  • spider38ss
    I m just about done with Yevgeny Zamiatin s WE , a classic dystopia that influenced both Huxley and Orwell among others. Here s a little taste: The cheerful
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2002
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      I'm just about done with Yevgeny Zamiatin's "WE", a classic dystopia
      that influenced both Huxley and Orwell among others. Here's a little
      taste:

      "The cheerful crystalline sound of the bell at my head. Seven
      o'clock. Time to get up. To the right and to the left as in
      mirrors, to the right and to the left through the glass walls I see
      others like myself, other rooms like my own, movements like mine,
      duplicated thousands of times. This invigorates me; I see myself as
      a part of an enormous, vigorous, united body; and what precise
      beauty! Not a single superfluous gesture, or bow, or turn. Yes,
      this Taylor [Frederick W. Taylor, 1856-1915] was undoubtably the
      greatest genius of the ancients. True, he did not come to the idea
      of applying his method to the whole life, to every step throughout
      the twenty-four hours of the day; he was unable to integrate his
      system from one o'clock to twenty-four. I cannot understand the
      ancients. How could they write whole libraries about some Kant and
      take only slight notice of Taylor, of this prophet who saw ten
      centuries ahead."

      So is anybody currently reading any interesting Science Fiction that
      they'd like to talk about?
      Spider
    • Al
      ... I ve just finished Neal Stephenson s THE DIAMOND AGE. It started well, lots of good ideas, but the ending was disastrously bad. Al
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 1, 2002
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        At 11:53 AM 1/06/2002 +0000, you wrote:
        >So is anybody currently reading any interesting Science Fiction that
        >they'd like to talk about?

        I've just finished Neal Stephenson's THE DIAMOND AGE. It started well,
        lots of good ideas, but the ending was disastrously bad.

        Al
      • viglizzo
        Is this Taylor a real life character??
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 8, 2002
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          Is this Taylor a real life character??

          --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., spider38ss <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > beauty! Not a single superfluous gesture, or bow, or turn. Yes,
          > this Taylor [Frederick W. Taylor, 1856-1915] was undoubtably the
          > greatest genius of the ancients. True, he did not come to the idea
          > of applying his method to the whole life, to every step throughout
          > the twenty-four hours of the day; he was unable to integrate his
          > system from one o'clock to twenty-four. I cannot understand the
          > ancients. How could they write whole libraries about some Kant and
          > take only slight notice of Taylor, of this prophet who saw ten
          > centuries ahead."

          > Spider
        • viglizzo
          ... that ... I just finished The quantum Rose by Catherine Asaro, but I guess I should discuss it in Centerville.
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 8, 2002
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            --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., spider38ss <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > So is anybody currently reading any interesting Science Fiction
            that
            > they'd like to talk about?
            > Spider

            I just finished "The quantum Rose" by Catherine Asaro, but I guess I
            should discuss it in Centerville.
          • Pete Young
            ... I must be missing some posts because I never got Spider s original post of this quote. To answer the question though, Taylor certainly was a real life
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 8, 2002
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              on 8/6/2002 10:51 pm, viglizzo wrote:

              > Is this Taylor a real life character??
              >
              > --- In sciencefictionclassics@y..., spider38ss <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              >> beauty! Not a single superfluous gesture, or bow, or turn. Yes,
              >> this Taylor [Frederick W. Taylor, 1856-1915] was undoubtably the
              >> greatest genius of the ancients. True, he did not come to the idea
              >> of applying his method to the whole life, to every step throughout
              >> the twenty-four hours of the day; he was unable to integrate his
              >> system from one o'clock to twenty-four. I cannot understand the
              >> ancients. How could they write whole libraries about some Kant and
              >> take only slight notice of Taylor, of this prophet who saw ten
              >> centuries ahead."

              I must be missing some posts because I never got Spider's original post of
              this quote. To answer the question though, Taylor certainly was a real life
              character. A quote from the introduction to my edition (Penguin 20th Century
              Classics, translated by Clarence Brown):

              "Part of man's bright future as a machine rested on the theories of an
              American efficiency expert named Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856-1915). This
              'father of scientific management' pioneered the time-and-motion studies that
              transformed industrial workers into maximally efficient adjuncts of the
              machines they were hired to operate. He was naturally seen as a messiah by
              management, while his name was universally execrated on the shop floor. Even
              so powerful a figure as Nadezhda Krupskaya, Lenin's consort in what was to
              become the modern world's most ruthless managerial class, wrote in praise of
              Taylor's theories. The novelist [Zamyatin], meditating on where 'Taylorism'
              might lead if taken to extremes, conceived of a 'reductio ad absurdum' in
              which characters behave as nearly as possible as though they themselves were
              fail-safe pieces of hardware."

              Pete
            • Ignacio Viglizzo
              Welcome to new members kandebt, relayer2001,mgellis2. Please make yourselves comfortable, tell us what s on your mind and on your reading table! :-) =====
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 9, 2002
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                Welcome to new members kandebt, relayer2001,mgellis2. Please make yourselves
                comfortable, tell us what's on your mind and on your reading table! :-)

                =====
                Ignacio

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              • Ignacio Viglizzo
                Pete: Thanks again! Your an astounding source of knowledge. ... To answer the question though, Taylor certainly was a real life ... ===== Ignacio
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 9, 2002
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                  Pete: Thanks again! Your an astounding source of knowledge.
                  --- Pete Young <pete-young@...> wrote:
                  To answer the question though, Taylor certainly was a real life
                  > character. A quote from the introduction to my edition (Penguin 20th Century
                  > Classics, translated by Clarence Brown):
                  >
                  > "Part of man's bright future as a machine rested on the theories of an
                  > American efficiency expert named Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856-1915). This
                  > 'father of scientific management' pioneered the time-and-motion studies that
                  > transformed industrial workers into maximally efficient adjuncts of the
                  > machines they were hired to operate. He was naturally seen as a messiah by
                  > management, while his name was universally execrated on the shop floor. Even
                  > so powerful a figure as Nadezhda Krupskaya, Lenin's consort in what was to
                  > become the modern world's most ruthless managerial class, wrote in praise of
                  > Taylor's theories. The novelist [Zamyatin], meditating on where 'Taylorism'
                  > might lead if taken to extremes, conceived of a 'reductio ad absurdum' in
                  > which characters behave as nearly as possible as though they themselves were
                  > fail-safe pieces of hardware."
                  >
                  > Pete


                  =====
                  Ignacio

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                  Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup
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