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Wind over Water

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  • derhexer@aol.com
    URL to an article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about efforts to put wind turbines on bodies of water, such as Lakes Michigan and Superior
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 8, 2008
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      URL to an article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about efforts to put
      wind turbines on bodies of water, such as Lakes Michigan and Superior

      _http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/35693224.html_
      (http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/35693224.html)

      Couple of relevant paragraphs
      "Wind power has already established a beachhead on Wisconsin soil - you can
      see 88 Danish-built windmills stretching 400 feet into the sky just east of
      Lake Winnebago. They're capable of squeezing enough juice from the airstream to
      power 36,000 homes, according to We Energies.
      Similar blades are spinning along U.S. Highway 41 in Fond du Lac County. And
      they're whirling near the Lake Michigan shoreline in Kewaunee County.
      And now it looks like at least one might be headed for scenic Madeline
      Island.
      Alan Fischlowitz, a retired mechanical engineer involved in the study, says
      it is more likely the island would install several small turbines instead of
      one big one. He also says nobody is thinking wind power will allow the island
      to completely unplug from the mainland, because there likely will be times
      during peak demands that the island will have to import power.
      Still, he says, the goal would be for the island to produce as much
      electricity over the course of the year as it consumes; at times when the island
      generates more than it needs, the excess would be sent back to the mainland.
      Gazing out at a wind-swept Lake Superior from the site of the new test tower,
      Fischlowitz predicts it's only a matter of time until someone plants
      turbines in the Great Lakes themselves.
      "I think it's probably inevitable," says the retired mechanical engineer who
      now operates a cottage resort on the island.
      He isn't alone.
      Many see the lakes as simply too big, too windy and too close to power-hungry
      population centers not to be exploited for their clean energy.
      "I see that coming," says Soji Adelaja, a land policy professor at Michigan
      State University. "I'd say in 10 years we'll have several large wind
      developments on the Great Lakes."
      Wind power is, of course, controversial.
      A big knock is that until power-storage technology evolves, wind farms will
      work only when the wind blows. Wind energy proponents counter that the sites
      picked for wind farms are predictably gusty, though they acknowledge wind
      turbines will never be a complete answer to the nation's energy issues. But they
      say they can be a significant part of the our energy future when
      intelligently integrated with traditional power plants that have the ability to pick up
      the slack when wind doesn't deliver.
      There are also issues of cost. Wind power critics contend the industry would
      die without ample subsidies; proponents counter that wind makes absolute
      economic sense when balanced against the untallied environmental costs of coal,
      including the pollution the plants emit and their production of greenhouse
      gases that are linked to global warming.
      Wisconsin lawmakers are concerned enough about the downside of traditional
      power generation that in 2006 they ordered utilities to produce 10% of
      electricity from renewable resources by 2015, which would require about a threefold
      increase in renewable power.
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Peter
      There is a propossed project planned for the New England Coast. Its currently being blocked by the hyper-rich leaders of the enviromental movement that own the
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 17, 2008
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        There is a propossed project planned for the New England Coast. Its
        currently being blocked by the hyper-rich leaders of the enviromental
        movement that own the beach. They just don't want their veiw to be
        spoilled.

        JP

        --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@... wrote:
        >
        > URL to an article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about efforts
        to put
        > wind turbines on bodies of water, such as Lakes Michigan and
        Superior
        >
        > _http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/35693224.html_
        > (http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/35693224.html)
        >
        > Couple of relevant paragraphs
        > "Wind power has already established a beachhead on Wisconsin soil -
        you can
        > see 88 Danish-built windmills stretching 400 feet into the sky just
        east of
        > Lake Winnebago. They're capable of squeezing enough juice from the
        airstream to
        > power 36,000 homes, according to We Energies.
        > Similar blades are spinning along U.S. Highway 41 in Fond du Lac
        County. And
        > they're whirling near the Lake Michigan shoreline in Kewaunee
        County.
        > And now it looks like at least one might be headed for scenic
        Madeline
        > Island.
        > Alan Fischlowitz, a retired mechanical engineer involved in the
        study, says
        > it is more likely the island would install several small turbines
        instead of
        > one big one. He also says nobody is thinking wind power will allow
        the island
        > to completely unplug from the mainland, because there likely will
        be times
        > during peak demands that the island will have to import power.
        > Still, he says, the goal would be for the island to produce as
        much
        > electricity over the course of the year as it consumes; at times
        when the island
        > generates more than it needs, the excess would be sent back to the
        mainland.
        > Gazing out at a wind-swept Lake Superior from the site of the new
        test tower,
        > Fischlowitz predicts it's only a matter of time until someone
        plants
        > turbines in the Great Lakes themselves.
        > "I think it's probably inevitable," says the retired mechanical
        engineer who
        > now operates a cottage resort on the island.
        > He isn't alone.
        > Many see the lakes as simply too big, too windy and too close to
        power-hungry
        > population centers not to be exploited for their clean energy.
        > "I see that coming," says Soji Adelaja, a land policy professor at
        Michigan
        > State University. "I'd say in 10 years we'll have several large
        wind
        > developments on the Great Lakes."
        > Wind power is, of course, controversial.
        > A big knock is that until power-storage technology evolves, wind
        farms will
        > work only when the wind blows. Wind energy proponents counter that
        the sites
        > picked for wind farms are predictably gusty, though they
        acknowledge wind
        > turbines will never be a complete answer to the nation's energy
        issues. But they
        > say they can be a significant part of the our energy future when
        > intelligently integrated with traditional power plants that have
        the ability to pick up
        > the slack when wind doesn't deliver.
        > There are also issues of cost. Wind power critics contend the
        industry would
        > die without ample subsidies; proponents counter that wind makes
        absolute
        > economic sense when balanced against the untallied environmental
        costs of coal,
        > including the pollution the plants emit and their production of
        greenhouse
        > gases that are linked to global warming.
        > Wisconsin lawmakers are concerned enough about the downside of
        traditional
        > power generation that in 2006 they ordered utilities to produce 10%
        of
        > electricity from renewable resources by 2015, which would require
        about a threefold
        > increase in renewable power.
        > **************Make your life easier with all your friends, email,
        and
        > favorite sites in one place. Try it now.
        > (http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-
        dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000010)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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