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How a dog blazed the trail for life in space

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  • derhexer@aol.com
    URL to an interesting article in MSNBC _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/) Interesting speculation on how our own
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 2, 2007
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      URL to an interesting article in MSNBC
      _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/)

      Interesting speculation on how our own probes to other planets and
      interplanetary objects might be spreading life through the universe.

      (Still makes me sad to think about poor Laika dying)

      First few paragraphs
      "

      By James Oberg
      NBC News space analyst
      Special to MSNBC
      updated 12:01 p.m. CT, Fri., Nov. 2, 2007

      _


      James Oberg
      NBC News space analyst


      Space exploration has been populating the solar system_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/#) with manmade hardware for half a century, and last
      month marked the 50th anniversary of Sputnik, the planet’s first artificial
      satellite. But an even more significant breakthrough occurred less than a month
      later, on Nov. 3, 1957, when space hardware began carrying life forms into
      long-duration orbits.
      This Saturday marks the 50th anniversary of that milestone mission — the
      Russian Sputnik 2 launch that put a dog named Laika into orbit. Most of the
      remembrances of "Muttnik" may focuse solely on the first dog in space and her sad
      fate. But in the annals of the expansion of earthly life to _the universe_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/#) beyond, the full story is much more
      profound.
      Laika's flight marked the beginning of a pilgrimage that has brought
      terrestrial life forms to the moon and very likely far beyond. That pilgrimage will
      only expand in the coming decades, and will surely have far wider
      significance than it has to date.

      _Story continues below ↓_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/#storyContinued) advertisement



      Even during that first flight, Laika did not ride alone. Like all advanced
      organisms on Earth, the dog carried an array of microorganisms in every nook
      and cranny of her body. Laika herself died of overheating just a few hours
      after launch, due to a thermal control _system failure_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/#) — a fact concealed by the Russians for decades. But that was
      hardly the end of the voyage.
      The other living organisms in Sputnik 2 would have continued to thrive for
      the nearly six months the satellite remained in orbit, living off the
      biological materials and water provided by Laika’s body. Temperatures inside the
      inert vehicle were well within the range in which Earth life can function, and
      the pressurized cabin would have remained intact.
      Everything was destroyed — and likely sterilized — when the satellite
      slipped into the upper atmosphere on April 14, 1958. The forms that the "Laika
      biosphere" took can only be speculated about. But some microbes almost certainly
      survived until the very end."







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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • raybell_scot
      ... Aye the animal rights people complained bitterly about it. But I wonder if she hadn t been sent up that many people may have died. The Americans used
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 3, 2007
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        --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@... wrote:
        >
        > URL to an interesting article in MSNBC
        > _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/_
        > (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/)
        >
        > Interesting speculation on how our own probes to other planets and
        > interplanetary objects might be spreading life through the universe.
        >
        > (Still makes me sad to think about poor Laika dying)

        Aye the animal rights people complained bitterly about it. But I
        wonder if she hadn't been sent up that many people may have died. The
        Americans used chimps, the Soviets dogs. I suppose dogs are more
        plentiful. Don't know which is better.

        Laika didn't have a particularly good life, she was found as a stray...
      • hectopede
        ... and ... universe. ... The ... stray... Who won t die for glory and become a star :)
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 3, 2007
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          --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "raybell_scot"
          <raybell_scot@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@ wrote:
          > >
          > > URL to an interesting article in MSNBC
          > > _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/_
          > > (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21596557/)
          > >
          > > Interesting speculation on how our own probes to other planets
          and
          > > interplanetary objects might be spreading life through the
          universe.
          > >
          > > (Still makes me sad to think about poor Laika dying)
          >
          > Aye the animal rights people complained bitterly about it. But I
          > wonder if she hadn't been sent up that many people may have died.
          The
          > Americans used chimps, the Soviets dogs. I suppose dogs are more
          > plentiful. Don't know which is better.
          >
          > Laika didn't have a particularly good life, she was found as a
          stray...

          Who won't die for glory and become a star :)
        • Aleus Mundi
          Well, at least we know now that the Fungi of Yuggoth were brought by an sneeze of Brin s Progenitors...;) -- The Transmundial rules all [Non-text portions of
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 9, 2007
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            Well, at least we know now that the Fungi of Yuggoth were brought by an
            sneeze of Brin's Progenitors...;)
            --
            The Transmundial rules all


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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