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Cold Dark Matter?? Hot Dark Matter?? Neutralinos??

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  • derhexer@aol.com
    URL to an interesting article from MSNBC _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/) Just gets better
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 13 8:53 PM
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      URL to an interesting article from MSNBC
      _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/)

      Just gets better and better

      "
      Dark matter's energy affected how early stars were born



      y Ker Than




      Updated: 2:06 p.m. CT Sept 13, 2007


      Some of the universe's first stars might still be lighting up their corners
      of the cosmos, new computer models suggest. And finding these stellar oldies
      could reveal something about the nature of _dark matter_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/#) .
      _Dark matter_
      (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/070108_mm_darkmatter_map.html) is a mysterious substance scientists think accounts for most of the
      mass in _the universe_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/#) but
      that is invisible to current instruments. Theorists figure that in the
      universe's infancy, dark matter served as a gravitational rallying point around
      which normal matter-hydrogen, helium and lithium-gathered. These gases coalesced
      into the first stars, bringing light to the universe and ending the
      short-lived cosmic dark ages.
      Meanwhile, researchers have been trying to figure out if dark matter is
      "cold" or "warm."

      _Story continues below ↓_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/#storyContinued) advertisement



      A star-formation model, detailed in the Sept. 14 issue of Science, suggests
      a way that scientists can choose between the two options. A third "hot" dark
      matter model has already been ruled out.
      The research could also lead to more accurate estimates of how long after
      the theoretical Big Bang that the _first stars_
      (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060717_mm_first_star.html) began to shine and help explain how the
      most massive _black holes_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761051/from/RS.3/#)
      form.
      Stellar anchors
      Dark matter's gravity anchored the first stars in place so they could form,
      but its energy affected how and where those stars were born, the new thinking
      goes. A popular candidate for dark matter is a relatively heavy particle
      known as the neutralino. The invisible particle would move slowly because of its
      heft so, borrowing the terminology of thermodynamics, scientists call it
      cold dark matter or CDM.







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    • Aleus Mundi
      Ho boy, at this pace we ll soon need those solar system-sized supercolliders to check out our current theories in cosmology! Just a little question der, why
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 14 10:03 AM
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        Ho boy, at this pace we'll soon need those solar system-sized supercolliders
        to check out our current theories in cosmology! Just a little question der,
        why there was no mention of p-branes?
        --
        The Transmundial rules all


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • derhexer@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/14/2007 12:04:46 P.M. Central Daylight Time, novovacuum@gmail.com writes: Ho boy, at this pace we ll soon need those solar system-sized
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 14 7:25 PM
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          In a message dated 9/14/2007 12:04:46 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
          novovacuum@... writes:

          Ho boy, at this pace we'll soon need those solar system-sized supercolliders
          to check out our current theories in cosmology! Just a little question der,
          why there was no mention of p-branes?


          Uh, well, there wasn't. Sorry. Take it up with the authors




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