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Half of humanity to live in cities soon

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  • derhexer@aol.com
    URL to an article from MSNBC _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/) I recall TJ Bass Half past Human and Godwhale
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 27, 2007
      URL to an article from MSNBC
      _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/)

      I recall TJ Bass' Half past Human and Godwhale books had trillions of people
      living in giant cities, Robert Silverberg's The World Inside portrayed life
      in a future arcology in a world of arcologies, and of course there is Trantor
      from the Foundation series. What are some other SF works that deal with
      huge cities?

      First few paragraphs
      "
      LONDON - Some 3.3 billion people — more than half of humanity — will be
      living in cities by next year, according to a U.N. report released Wednesday. By
      2030, cities will be home to close to 5 billion.
      Without proper planning, cities across the globe face the threat of
      overwhelming poverty, limited opportunities for youth, and religious extremism, U.N.
      Population Fund Executive Director Thoraya Ahmed Obaid told The Associated
      Press in London, where the report was released.
      "In 2008, half of the world's population will be in urban areas, and we are
      not ready for them," said Obaid, a U.N. undersecretary-general.





      Her agency's "State of the World Population 2007" report outlines the rate
      and scale of urban growth and calls for the policy initiatives to manage it.
      The agency found current policy initiatives often aim to keep the poor out
      of cities by limiting migration and cutting lower-income housing.
      "Cities see poor people as a burden," Obaid said. "They should be seen as an
      asset."

      Chris

      (I hereby reject your reality and substitute my own)




      ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mike B
      Blish s Cities In FLight trilogy had all the major cities of Earth leaving it, taking most of the population and leaving the Earth a poor backwater with no
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 28, 2007
        Blish's Cities In FLight trilogy had all the major cities of Earth
        leaving it, taking most of the population and leaving the Earth a poor
        backwater with no technology.
        Much like today's cities, they were populated by the "haves" ( city
        officers, etc) and the "have nots" grunt-workers, etc.
        Having had to drive through Boston the last two days, I can say that
        Boston's population is probably much the same due to cost of living, -
        only the very rich or the poor can live there and the majority of
        working people have to commute in each day.

        Mike B


        --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > URL to an article from MSNBC
        > _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/_
        > (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/)
        >
        > I recall TJ Bass' Half past Human and Godwhale books had trillions
        of people
        > living in giant cities, Robert Silverberg's The World Inside
        portrayed life
        > in a future arcology in a world of arcologies, and of course there
        is Trantor
        > from the Foundation series. What are some other SF works that deal
        with
        > huge cities?
        >
        > First few paragraphs
        > "
        > LONDON - Some 3.3 billion people â€" more than half of humanity â€"
        will be
        > living in cities by next year, according to a U.N. report released
        Wednesday. By
        > 2030, cities will be home to close to 5 billion.
        > Without proper planning, cities across the globe face the threat of
        > overwhelming poverty, limited opportunities for youth, and
        religious extremism, U.N.
        > Population Fund Executive Director Thoraya Ahmed Obaid told The
        Associated
        > Press in London, where the report was released.
        > "In 2008, half of the world's population will be in urban areas,
        and we are
        > not ready for them," said Obaid, a U.N. undersecretary-general.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Her agency's "State of the World Population 2007" report outlines
        the rate
        > and scale of urban growth and calls for the policy initiatives to
        manage it.
        > The agency found current policy initiatives often aim to keep the
        poor out
        > of cities by limiting migration and cutting lower-income housing.
        > "Cities see poor people as a burden," Obaid said. "They should be
        seen as an
        > asset."
        >
        > Chris
        >
        > (I hereby reject your reality and substitute my own)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ************************************** See what's free at
        http://www.aol.com
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • hectopede
        Plato s Republic is about a city of fantasy. Renassaince writers, for example Campanella, started the dream of fantastic cities like gigantic machines, where
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 28, 2007
          Plato's Republic is about a city of fantasy. Renassaince writers, for
          example Campanella, started the dream of fantastic cities like
          gigantic machines, where architecture serves an active purpose. In
          Thomas More's Utopia cities and countryside are in economic balance.
          Arthur Clarke loves to depict cities and other settlements.

          Andri

          --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@... wrote:
          >
          >
          > URL to an article from MSNBC
          > _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/_
          > (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19458575/)
          >
          > I recall TJ Bass' Half past Human and Godwhale books had trillions
          of people
          > living in giant cities, Robert Silverberg's The World Inside
          portrayed life
          > in a future arcology in a world of arcologies, and of course there
          is Trantor
          > from the Foundation series. What are some other SF works that
          deal with
          > huge cities?
          >
          > First few paragraphs
          > "
          > LONDON - Some 3.3 billion people â€" more than half of humanity
          â€" will be
          > living in cities by next year, according to a U.N. report released
          Wednesday. By
          > 2030, cities will be home to close to 5 billion.
          > Without proper planning, cities across the globe face the threat
          of
          > overwhelming poverty, limited opportunities for youth, and
          religious extremism, U.N.
          > Population Fund Executive Director Thoraya Ahmed Obaid told The
          Associated
          > Press in London, where the report was released.
          > "In 2008, half of the world's population will be in urban areas,
          and we are
          > not ready for them," said Obaid, a U.N. undersecretary-general.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Her agency's "State of the World Population 2007" report outlines
          the rate
          > and scale of urban growth and calls for the policy initiatives to
          manage it.
          > The agency found current policy initiatives often aim to keep the
          poor out
          > of cities by limiting migration and cutting lower-income housing.
          > "Cities see poor people as a burden," Obaid said. "They should be
          seen as an
          > asset."
          >
          > Chris
          >
          > (I hereby reject your reality and substitute my own)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ************************************** See what's free at
          http://www.aol.com
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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