Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Next-generation toys read brain waves

Expand Messages
  • raybell_scot
    Am I the only one who finds this a little creepy? What next? Toys to control children s brainwaves, and make them into docile citizens who question nothing?
    Message 1 of 3 , May 1, 2007
      Am I the only one who finds this a little creepy?

      What next? Toys to control children's brainwaves, and make them into
      docile citizens who question nothing?

      --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@... wrote:
      >
      > URL to an article in CNN
      >
      _http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/fun.games/04/30/mind.reading.toys.ap/in
      dex.html_
      >
      >
      (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/fun.games/04/30/mind.reading.toys.ap/in
      dex.html)
      >
      > I think Haldeman used something like this one of his books
      (Forever Peace?)
      >
      > First few paragraphs
      > "SAN JOSE, California (AP) -- A convincing twin of Darth Vader
      stalks the
      > beige cubicles of a Silicon Valley office, complete with ominous
      black mask,
      > cape and light saber.
      > But this is no chintzy Halloween costume. It's a prototype, years
      in the
      > making, of a toy that incorporates brain wave-reading technology.
      > Behind the mask is a sensor that touches the user's forehead and
      reads the
      > brain's electrical signals, then sends them to a wireless receiver
      inside the
      > saber, which lights up when the user is concentrating.
      > The player maintains focus by channeling thoughts on any fixed
      mental image,
      > or thinking specifically about keeping the light sword on. When
      the mind
      > wanders, the wand goes dark.
      > Engineers at NeuroSky Inc. have big plans for brain wave-reading
      toys and
      > video games. They say the simple Darth Vader game -- a relatively
      crude
      > biofeedback device cloaked in gimmicky garb -- portends the coming
      of more
      > sophisticated devices that could revolutionize the way people
      play.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ************************************** See what's free at
      http://www.aol.com
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • hectopede
      Toys to keep an eye on the children s naughty thoughts. ... into ... _http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/fun.games/04/30/mind.reading.toys.ap/in ...
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2007
        Toys to keep an eye on the children's naughty thoughts.

        --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "raybell_scot"
        <raybell_scot@...> wrote:
        >
        > Am I the only one who finds this a little creepy?
        >
        > What next? Toys to control children's brainwaves, and make them
        into
        > docile citizens who question nothing?
        >
        > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, derhexer@ wrote:
        > >
        > > URL to an article in CNN
        > >
        >
        _http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/fun.games/04/30/mind.reading.toys.ap/in
        > dex.html_
        > >
        > >
        >
        (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/fun.games/04/30/mind.reading.toys.ap/in
        > dex.html)
        > >
        > > I think Haldeman used something like this one of his books
        > (Forever Peace?)
        > >
        > > First few paragraphs
        > > "SAN JOSE, California (AP) -- A convincing twin of Darth Vader
        > stalks the
        > > beige cubicles of a Silicon Valley office, complete with ominous
        > black mask,
        > > cape and light saber.
        > > But this is no chintzy Halloween costume. It's a prototype, years
        > in the
        > > making, of a toy that incorporates brain wave-reading technology.
        > > Behind the mask is a sensor that touches the user's forehead and
        > reads the
        > > brain's electrical signals, then sends them to a wireless
        receiver
        > inside the
        > > saber, which lights up when the user is concentrating.
        > > The player maintains focus by channeling thoughts on any fixed
        > mental image,
        > > or thinking specifically about keeping the light sword on. When
        > the mind
        > > wanders, the wand goes dark.
        > > Engineers at NeuroSky Inc. have big plans for brain wave-reading
        > toys and
        > > video games. They say the simple Darth Vader game -- a relatively
        > crude
        > > biofeedback device cloaked in gimmicky garb -- portends the
        coming
        > of more
        > > sophisticated devices that could revolutionize the way people
        > play.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.