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NASA to set up polar Moon base

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  • derhexer@aol.com
    URL to a fascinating article in MSNBC _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16042651/_ (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16042651/) Notice the last line in the quote. We re
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
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      URL to a fascinating article in MSNBC
      _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16042651/_
      (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16042651/)

      Notice the last line in the quote. We're not going to get into space until
      someone can actually make a profit

      "HOUSTON - NASA announced Monday its strategy and rationale for robotic and
      _human exploration_ (http://www.space.com/news/050919_nasa_moon.html) of the
      moon, determining that a lunar outpost is the best approach to achieve a
      sustained, human presence there.
      The base would be built in incremental steps, starting with four-person
      crews making several seven-day visits. The first mission would begin by 2020,
      with the base growing over time, beefed up with more power, mobility rovers and
      living quarters.
      The moon base would eventually support 180-day lunar stays, a stretch of
      time seen as the best avenue to establish a permanent presence there, as well as
      prepare for future human exploration of Mars.


      Here at the NASA Johnson Space Center, space agency planners detailed a
      global exploration strategy, outlining the themes and objectives of 21st century
      lunar exploration and the hardware needed to regain a foothold on the moon.


      NASA’s lunar plan also encourages participation by other nations, as well as
      non-governmental organizations and commercial groups."
      Chris


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Aleus Mundi
      That s true, unfortunately, NASA has proven as useful to permanent settlements in space as submarines, mostly by lack of support of the government (remember,
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 7, 2006
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        That's true, unfortunately, NASA has proven as useful to permanent
        settlements in space as submarines, mostly by lack of support of the
        government (remember, most of the space program was made under Kennedy's
        shadow)

        On 12/5/06, derhexer@... <derhexer@...> wrote:
        >
        > URL to a fascinating article in MSNBC
        > _http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16042651/_
        > (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16042651/)
        >
        > Notice the last line in the quote. We're not going to get into space until
        >
        > someone can actually make a profit
        >
        > "HOUSTON - NASA announced Monday its strategy and rationale for robotic
        > and
        > _human exploration_ (http://www.space.com/news/050919_nasa_moon.html) of
        > the
        > moon, determining that a lunar outpost is the best approach to achieve a
        > sustained, human presence there.
        > The base would be built in incremental steps, starting with four-person
        > crews making several seven-day visits. The first mission would begin by
        > 2020,
        > with the base growing over time, beefed up with more power, mobility
        > rovers and
        > living quarters.
        > The moon base would eventually support 180-day lunar stays, a stretch of
        > time seen as the best avenue to establish a permanent presence there, as
        > well as
        > prepare for future human exploration of Mars.
        >
        >
        > Here at the NASA Johnson Space Center, space agency planners detailed a
        > global exploration strategy, outlining the themes and objectives of 21st
        > century
        > lunar exploration and the hardware needed to regain a foothold on the
        > moon.
        >
        > NASA's lunar plan also encourages participation by other nations, as well
        > as
        > non-governmental organizations and commercial groups."
        > Chris
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        The Transmundial rules all


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • raybell_scot
        ... Kennedy s ... And by mutual push-pull with the Soviets in the Cold War. As soon as the Cold War cooled off/warmed up (alright, these heat metaphors are
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 8, 2006
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          --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Aleus Mundi"
          <novovacuum@...> wrote:
          >
          > That's true, unfortunately, NASA has proven as useful to permanent
          > settlements in space as submarines, mostly by lack of support of the
          > government (remember, most of the space program was made under
          Kennedy's
          > shadow)

          And by mutual push-pull with the Soviets in the Cold War. As soon as
          the Cold War cooled off/warmed up (alright, these heat metaphors are
          duff - you know what I mean) so did the Space Race. What's going on
          now is part driven by Sino-American rivalry. And the Chinese are a
          bit behind yet.

          I have to admit I'm somewhat disappointed by European efforts in
          space (i.e. west of the former USSR), but there you go.

          Anybody read "Moondust"? Very interesting account of what the
          Moonwalkers did next (not including Michael Jackson) - and mentions
          how the quick, cynical option was taken to the Moon, which did not
          provide for a long term plan. Great shame. Just think, in the early
          1980s, we had been several years off the Moon, the Space Shuttle was
          running fairly well (and Buran was in the running too), and there was
          a supersonic passenger jet. Now, all of these apart from the Space
          Shuttle to a limited extent, are scuppered.
        • hectopede
          ... the ... as ... are ... was ... was ... I read Moondust as a schoolboy. It was translated into Russian and included in the most popular adventure stories
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 8, 2006
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            --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "raybell_scot"
            <raybell_scot@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "Aleus Mundi"
            > <novovacuum@> wrote:
            > >
            > > That's true, unfortunately, NASA has proven as useful to permanent
            > > settlements in space as submarines, mostly by lack of support of
            the
            > > government (remember, most of the space program was made under
            > Kennedy's
            > > shadow)
            >
            > And by mutual push-pull with the Soviets in the Cold War. As soon
            as
            > the Cold War cooled off/warmed up (alright, these heat metaphors
            are
            > duff - you know what I mean) so did the Space Race. What's going on
            > now is part driven by Sino-American rivalry. And the Chinese are a
            > bit behind yet.
            >
            > I have to admit I'm somewhat disappointed by European efforts in
            > space (i.e. west of the former USSR), but there you go.
            >
            > Anybody read "Moondust"? Very interesting account of what the
            > Moonwalkers did next (not including Michael Jackson) - and mentions
            > how the quick, cynical option was taken to the Moon, which did not
            > provide for a long term plan. Great shame. Just think, in the early
            > 1980s, we had been several years off the Moon, the Space Shuttle
            was
            > running fairly well (and Buran was in the running too), and there
            was
            > a supersonic passenger jet. Now, all of these apart from the Space
            > Shuttle to a limited extent, are scuppered.

            I read "Moondust" as a schoolboy. It was translated into Russian and
            included in the most popular adventure stories series in Soviet
            Union.

            The time of cold wars between national states seems to be over.
            Companies have become more powerful than governments. Another cosmic
            race with some "cold war" might happen between Coca-Cola and Pepsi-
            Cole :)

            Andri
          • Aleus Mundi
            Damn, what if Enron decides to send its excedent of computronium to the Moon as waste: Space 1999? ... -- The Transmundial rules all [Non-text portions of this
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 8, 2006
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              Damn, what if Enron decides to send its excedent of computronium to the Moon
              as waste: Space 1999?

              On 12/8/06, hectopede <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              >
              > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com<sciencefictionclassics%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > "raybell_scot"
              > <raybell_scot@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com<sciencefictionclassics%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > "Aleus Mundi"
              > > <novovacuum@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > That's true, unfortunately, NASA has proven as useful to permanent
              > > > settlements in space as submarines, mostly by lack of support of
              > the
              > > > government (remember, most of the space program was made under
              > > Kennedy's
              > > > shadow)
              > >
              > > And by mutual push-pull with the Soviets in the Cold War. As soon
              > as
              > > the Cold War cooled off/warmed up (alright, these heat metaphors
              > are
              > > duff - you know what I mean) so did the Space Race. What's going on
              > > now is part driven by Sino-American rivalry. And the Chinese are a
              > > bit behind yet.
              > >
              > > I have to admit I'm somewhat disappointed by European efforts in
              > > space (i.e. west of the former USSR), but there you go.
              > >
              > > Anybody read "Moondust"? Very interesting account of what the
              > > Moonwalkers did next (not including Michael Jackson) - and mentions
              > > how the quick, cynical option was taken to the Moon, which did not
              > > provide for a long term plan. Great shame. Just think, in the early
              > > 1980s, we had been several years off the Moon, the Space Shuttle
              > was
              > > running fairly well (and Buran was in the running too), and there
              > was
              > > a supersonic passenger jet. Now, all of these apart from the Space
              > > Shuttle to a limited extent, are scuppered.
              >
              > I read "Moondust" as a schoolboy. It was translated into Russian and
              > included in the most popular adventure stories series in Soviet
              > Union.
              >
              > The time of cold wars between national states seems to be over.
              > Companies have become more powerful than governments. Another cosmic
              > race with some "cold war" might happen between Coca-Cola and Pepsi-
              > Cole :)
              >
              > Andri
              >
              >
              >



              --
              The Transmundial rules all


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • raybell_scot
              ... I think we have our wires crossed, I m thinking of a book which came out in the late 90s/early 21st century, so, not Soviet era. Full title is Moondust:
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 8, 2006
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                --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, hectopede <no_reply@...>
                wrote:
                > I read "Moondust" as a schoolboy. It was translated into Russian and
                > included in the most popular adventure stories series in Soviet
                > Union.

                I think we have our wires crossed, I'm thinking of a book which came
                out in the late 90s/early 21st century, so, not Soviet era.

                Full title is "Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth" by
                Andrew Smith, an Englishman. Amazon.com entry here -
                http://tinyurl.com/taq6h
              • hectopede
                ... ... and ... came ... Sorry :) Anyway, the subjects touched upon were also treated in Clarke s book. Quite thoroughly.
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 9, 2006
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                  --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, "raybell_scot"
                  <raybell_scot@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In sciencefictionclassics@yahoogroups.com, hectopede
                  <no_reply@>
                  > wrote:
                  > > I read "Moondust" as a schoolboy. It was translated into Russian
                  and
                  > > included in the most popular adventure stories series in Soviet
                  > > Union.
                  >
                  > I think we have our wires crossed, I'm thinking of a book which
                  came
                  > out in the late 90s/early 21st century, so, not Soviet era.
                  >
                  > Full title is "Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth" by
                  > Andrew Smith, an Englishman. Amazon.com entry here -
                  > http://tinyurl.com/taq6h

                  Sorry :) Anyway, the subjects touched upon were also treated in
                  Clarke's book. Quite thoroughly.
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